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RCBS The Grand VS Dillion SL 900

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by shotgun 1, Feb 10, 2012.

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  1. shotgun 1

    shotgun 1 Member

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    Aug 25, 2006
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    I've had both and liked them both. Both companies provide great service on parts. The Dillon is faster to load on, but costs more up front. The Grand still loads a bunch of shells in a short time and costs less.

    I've seen some horror stories about folks having trouble getting Dillons up and running, but my experience wasn't the least bit negative.

    No wrong choice in my book, just some different features and a bit of difference in price.
    Dave
     
  2. chuckie68

    chuckie68 Active Member

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    Location:
    Royal Oak, Michigan
    I just purchased a MEC 9000, my first automatic loader. It took me about a week of trial and erreo to gete it working properly. All the problems were with the primer feed. MEC replaced the PF mount in about 1 day after I called them. Now it works perfectly and has the capability to put out about 10 or so boxes of shells an hour.

    You might look on youTube and watch all the videos for all the machines before you make your final decision.

    Chuck
     
  3. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    If you want speed, Dillon is the best of all of the progressives. And I've tried or owned them all. But, just like anything else things go out of adjustment or break. I loaded 750 rounds yesterday morning on my Dillon, smooth as silk. I also have a PW800+ electric and it's not even close in speed. It makes a good shell and I don't have to pull the handle but not fast.

    And I've been loading on my Dillon since the 1990's when they came out, a lot of shells.
     
  4. stokinpls

    stokinpls Well-Known Member

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    After owning an SL900, I'd never want a loader without a hull feeder again. The Dillon's hull feeder isn't flawless, but it sure is nice to never let got of the handle to pick up a hull and set it on the carousel. Your left hand feeds wads, that's it. Cost is definitely a factor. A MEC 9000G is hard to beat because of this. Looking at the Grand on Youtube, I'd say it looks well made. Good luck.
     
  5. wbill

    wbill Member

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    A freind has a SL900 and the only thing I see is it does not have the final taper station that rounds the end. Bill
     
  6. warren

    warren Member

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    I've owned both and they are both good machines as stated above however when using my Dillon I experienced numerous double powder charges and I think it was because the Dillon drops the powder at the beginning of the downward pull of the handle and if there is any problem and you don't catch it you get a double charge. I therefore sold my Dillon and purchased a Grand and have experienced no double charge problems. I'm quite sure I'll get some disagreement from this post but that is what I experienced and that's what I did. Dillon gives great service and are very cooperative and so is RCBS.

    warren
     
  7. JPSemper

    JPSemper Member

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    I've never dropped a double powder load in my Dillon. The key is to never hesitate on the stroke of the handle. I tried both and settled on the Dillon based upon their metallic reloading reputation. You definitely need to be mechanically inclined but both companies will gladly help you out. The one thing that I found is just because you can load at the "speed of light", doesn't mean you have to feed the machines as fast as you can. Develop a rhythm in loading and your loads will come out near as perfect as possible.


    If this is your first venture into reloading, make sure you add a good scale to your shopping list. Also, ask around where you shoot for shooters who own both systems. Don't be afraid to ask them their opinions first hand and I'll bet they will invite you to visit their reloading bench to make up our own mind. That's what I did and have invited many people to my home to try the Dillon out to make up their own mind.


    John Semprini
    Chicago
     
  8. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    Of all the shells I've made in my Dillon's I have never had a double load----ever. I have had in the PW. My own fault I'm sure.
     
  9. Bird30

    Bird30 TS Member

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    I have had a Dillion for years and how would you get a double load without doing it on purpose. The only problem I have ever had. I broke a primer arm (BUT EVERY BODY DOES THAT WHEN LEARNING) and it has skipped a primer ever now and then but a double load never.

    Dave
     
  10. TinMan88

    TinMan88 TS Member

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    That is a good point warren, about the drop at the beginning of the downstroke. The RCBS has gates that delay the drop till 2/3 down in the stroke. This is helpful as the wads jam frequently in the next station causing me to back up to get the jammed wad out. Never had a double drop.
     
  11. Bird30

    Bird30 TS Member

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    I think you need to look again about when the dillion drops the powder.

    Dave
     
  12. Pocatello

    Pocatello Active Member

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    I have loaded tens of thousands of rounds on my Dillon and never had a double charge.
     
  13. Len in Phoenix

    Len in Phoenix TS Member

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    I've had an RCBS Grand since 2006 and absolutely love it. Like any progressive press, it takes a bit to get all the stations dialed in and for you to establish a smooth routine. Once you and the machine are set up, you'll find that you spend more time topping up components and boxing shells than you do actually pulling the handle. Both companies have legendary customer service. The RCBS has some "sacrificial" parts that have to be replaced every 10,000 shells or so...the plastic shell holders are a good example. It takes about 10 minutes to replace them and give the press a good cleaning. RCBS customer service will send you anything you break or wear out, for free, with just a phone call. I've started two phone calls with "Hi, I'm calling because I'm stupid." They just laugh and ask what I broke and send it out free. Good people, good products.

    My machine is a bit of a hybrid. It's mounted on a Dillon "strong mount" so that it sits up above the bench, and it has had a Dillon roller handle grafted onto the operating lever. The roller handle makes a world of difference! I highly recommend it.

    You won't go wrong with either press....

    Len in PHoenix


    leninphoenix_2008_03035.jpg
     
  14. warren

    warren Member

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    All I can say is that if you ever get a double charge you'll sure know it.

    warren
     
  15. build4u

    build4u Member

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    Feb 16, 2007
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    build4u_2008_03031.jpg
    In the picture you can see the Dillon is at least 90% of the way through the stroke before it drops the powder charge. It is very hard to double charge because shortly after the round comes out of the powder drop die far enough for the powder measure to reload the powder bar, the shell plate starts to index the round to the next station. The powder measure works the same way across the product line.The Dillon also does a roll crimp.The crimp die has two seperate adjustments. The entire die adjusts up and down to adjust roll crimp and the rod adjustment controls crimp depth. I am a fan of the Blue as you can see.
     
  16. build4u

    build4u Member

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    I could not get the second image to load in the same post.
    build4u_2008_0303.jpg
     
  17. straightshooter1

    straightshooter1 Well-Known Member TS Supporters

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    Never had a double charge on my Dillon. I have considered selling it since I use the Spolar almost all the time, but would hesitate to sell it to someone as their first reloader unless they were local so I could show them how it works and shorten their learning curve. I still use it, from time to time, for certain loadings, but mostly it's the Spolar for me.

    Yes, there is a learning curve, but once you "get it," it's easy to load a lot of shells very quickly. I get the "tennis elbow" when I load a flat or so, so I went to the Spolar.

    I considered the Grand at one time, but went with the Dillon as I have used their metallic presses since the late 80s and really like them and their warranty.

    Bob
     
  18. Ruck

    Ruck Well-Known Member

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    No double charges, NEVER a broken anything, just thousands of perfect reloads since the year 2000 with my Dillon........

    Ken Rucker
     
  19. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    Nashville Tn
    I have sold and serviced most types of presses, including the two mentioned.

    I prefer the Mec 9000GN, and do will not own another type. I easily load a flat in about 22 minutes for the 12-28. The 410 is a little slower for me. YMMV.

    The Dillon is a converted metallic press. Their metallic presses are at the top of the food chain.

    The RCBS has more plumbing than needed.

    I have had to buy back the Dillon and RCBS presses, never had to buy a Mec back.
     
  20. Bill92869

    Bill92869 TS Member

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2008
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    I'm guessing that you're in the market for a press from your inquiry. I've been shooting and reloading f since the '70's. From what I can see all of today's offerings work well when operated properly and maintained. Most problems, whether from the $200 machine or the $4,000 one, are due to the user. Also from what I can see almost all suppliers stand behind their products and offer good to great support. Having said that, I have and use a Mec 9000. I love it, it works, the loads it produces have been 100% reliable and it didn't cost me much. In fact part of my decision making process covered costs and when you're spending $100's of dollars less on the press you can reload a heck of a lot more shells.
     
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