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QUESTIONS FROM NEW TRAP SHOOTERS

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by dog easy, Nov 5, 2009.

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  1. dog easy

    dog easy TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    127
    I got some questions while at the pistol range today and frankly I couldn't give a very good answer. I would be very interested in what your answer would be.

    1. What is a good gun to start with? My answer: an 870 or BT-99.

    2. How do I know when I need a "better gun"? My answer: You just will.

    3. Will a "better", ie. more expensive gun make me a better shooter? My answer: I don't know.

    Like I said, not good answers. I told him I would ask you guys and see what you have to say. I was able to tell him the four rules of gun safety, so I get a C- for the afternoon.............

    Shoot safe, John
     
  2. PAR8HED

    PAR8HED Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2008
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    424
    1. Agreed. Or a nice Citori. My first was a Model 12. I think most would say whatever you are happy with shooting.
    2. When you decide what it is you want for a gun. The list of options is quite long.
    3. I'd bet most here will say no. But I'll play the devil's advocate. A little, with practice. If you're shooting 18s and you move to a gun set up for trap, that is probably worth a few birds. i.e. having a gun that shoots 70/30 instead of flat. Or one that fits you better than what you're shooting now. Probably worth a few birds. But I'd think most here would say practice is what counts.

    just my 2 cents. HJH
     
  3. jhoward

    jhoward Member

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    Nov 4, 2008
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    827
    1. What is a good gun to start with? My answer: an 870 or BT-99.

    I would add 1100's and 390/391's to this list. Especially if they might be a little recoil sensitive.

    2. How do I know when I need a "better gun"? My answer: You just will.

    If they start with a good gun, they won't ever necessarily 'need' a better gun. My father shot the same 870TB for 40+ years.

    3. Will a "better", ie. more expensive gun make me a better shooter? My answer: I don't know.

    Only if it fits them better, which is more likely due to the added likelyhood of it having an adjustable comb, LOP, and/or rib.
     
  4. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    3,594
    1. Focus on an inexpensive gun but one that will permit shooting two shots - that means over/under or auto-loader. Reason? I've seen a considerable number of people that like pounding out singles but absolutely fall in love with wobble, 5 stand, sporting, and trap doubles. Best to have the ability to have two shots.

    2. This usually relates to "Want a better gun." That may happen quite soon or not. Working on skills is better than changing guns 4 times a year.

    3. Changing guns, whether "better" or just different, may make you a better shooter but you can't count on it. I prefer to have people try as many guns as they can arrange, borrow, test drive, etc. and wait for that one that will stand out as the gun of choice for the individual. This can't happen to most in the first month of shooting but after a year or more with a gun, a "better" one may be obvious.

    Breakemall.....Bob Dodd
     
  5. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    Feb 1, 2006
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    2,474
    My friends keep buying "better" guns. They are definitely more expensive guns. I keep beating them. After shooting for a few decades I am more convinced than ever that it is not the gun that makes you a good shooter. If the gun shoots where you point it it will work as well as any other gun no matter what it cost. I have known several shooters recently that upgraded to expensive guns and their scores have actually dropped.
     
  6. RJ

    RJ TS Member

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    Apr 2, 2009
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    126
    You are corret with these statements BD, and so are yours highflyer But, with the situation I have by changing from a Remington 870 to the 1100 for less kick my average has not changed that much. Could this be because both Guns shoot in a basic similar characteristic of eachother? 22 years ago I shot the 870 with an 88% @ the 24 yard line. With having to go to the 1100 I shoot the 1100 at 88% from a wheel chair @ the same yard line. 16's and the 870 (which I have semi retired) I shoot an average of 91% with the 1100 I shoot 93%. Just two birds difference. (Richinnameonly)
    I hope this makes sence!!!
     
  7. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    I have seen so many shooters come and go in this sport. Most get bored and move on after a short time. Many of them have spent thousands on a gun. Fortunately for them you can get most of your money back with a shotgun.
     
  8. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    No, RJ, I'd suggest that you score similarly because that may well be your level of skill, vision, physical ability, level of practice vs competition and so on. In other words, it ain't the gun. I certainly know my limitations and skills and it wouldn't make one teeny bit of difference if I spent $10,000 on a new gun or resorted to starting afresh with your Rem. 870. I'd learn to shoot either but doubt sincerely that I'd become "better" because I spent the money. Unless you are young enough, having the free time, having the necessary cash, and understanding family to practice like any of the big dogs, I reckon you and I will always hover around close-but-no-cigar at best.....breakemall.....Bob Dodd
     
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