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Question for the fox/coyote hunters

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by sernv99, Jan 10, 2017.

  1. sernv99

    sernv99 Active Member

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    A guy near me wants to offload his stash of slugs/buckshot. These are the "low recoil" stuff that people who shoot 3 gun use or for home defense, it's not full power hunting loads. Just wondering if these "low recoil" slugs and buckshot can be used for to hunt fox or coyotes. I'll be hunting small fields and woods, not in open plain country so no rifle really needed. The land where I'll be hunting and the surrounding farms has plenty fox and coyotes that stomp through the grounds. They really killed off the local wild pheasant population.
     
  2. SecondChance

    SecondChance Member

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    I don't see why not as long as you keep your shots close. Under 40yds would be the max I would think.
     
  3. o-hale

    o-hale Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Kentucky
    Not that many fox around my area anymore, coyotes took care of a lot of them.
    Probably something else also contributed to the decline in pheasant population, bad winter, late freeze in spring, change in ag practices, etc
    I shoot the yotes but let the foxes walk which I seldom see anymore.
    Like secondchance says, keep your shots close and you should be fine, good luck
     
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  4. derbyacresbob

    derbyacresbob Well-Known Member

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    Kern County Ca
    Buckshot is not my first choice for coyotes because I like having more pellets for a dense pattern. Since fox are smaller than coyotes a denser pattern would be even better for them.

    I would much rather use the Federal 1-7/8 oz copper coated lead BB load, the Hornady Heavy Magnum Nickel Plated lead BB load or the Winchester Varmint X BB coyote load.

    A New Predator Load From Winchester

    10 rounds of Hornady Heavy Magnum Coyote 3" Nickel-plated BB Lead Shot - 234369, 12 Gauge Shells at Sportsman's Guide

    I looked around and couldn't find any of the Federal 1-7/8 oz lead BB loads anywhere.

    The other two 1-1/2 oz BB loads should have right at 78 lead BB pellets per shell compared to 41 pellets of lead number 4 buckshot per 3" shell.
     
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  5. SecondChance

    SecondChance Member

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    Agree with derby. But I have played with Remmys Hevi-Shot 2's and BB's are even better than lead on any day if you don't mind the cost. I use them as back up shells for goose guiding. I use it to clean up for the clients when I need to. And will swat honkers longer than I will say.
     
  6. Coyotehunter4

    Coyotehunter4 TS Member

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    Jan 1, 2017
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    They will be fine inside 30 yards.
     
  7. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    The big problem with using buckshot for coyote size and smaller predators is limited range caused by lack of pattern density.

    To achieve low recoil in buckshot, which approximates a heavy trap load for recoil, the powder charge is reduced and the number of pellets are reduced from 12 to 9. If fired from an open choke, the pattern is going to become very thin very quickly. To humanely put down a fox or coyote, you need to do damage to the lung and heart area. This is quite small. For testing purposes, you can replicate it by setting two trap clays on their edges as targets, dome towards you. You need to consistently get a couple of pellets into this area. One problem with 00 buck is that if you use restricted chokes, some have had problems with "clumping" as the pellets go through a full choke. Grab some clays, set them up per above, and test your gun and choke(s) at various ranges.

    This is why I use #4 buck, and only the 3" length which has 41 pellets. And even then only the premium versions with better quality lead alloy to prevent distortion as much as possible in a full choke or turkey choke. This setup will easily do 40 to 50 yards, but thins out after that. Lead BB or BBB shot also works very well. To a slightly lesser extent, so does steel BB. When using BB and especially steel you need to make sure it is a max load of pellets. Some of the specialty non-toxic, high density metal loads specifically made for coyotes have thinner patterns due to reduced pellet counts to keep the price from being too outrageous. I don't care for them for that reason.

    As for slugs, yes, I've hit a coyote with slugs. Did it while deer hunting. The shotgun had iron sights, and a mod choke. Was using Remington Sluggers, which generally group tighter with a mod choke. I'm not keen on slugs for coyotes due to group size, at least not with conventional slugs and smooth bores. When i was out hunting more often was considering a 20ga with a rifled bore and a low power scope using sabot slugs for coyote hunting during deer and elk seasons, where you cannot use a centerfire rifle without a tag for those species. Maybe when I retire I'll revisit this.

    Use advice as a guide, but TEST your gun, load and choke at various distances. That's the only way to actually know what your results will be.