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Question about the Remington 90T

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by RyanTT-99, Apr 21, 2010.

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  1. RyanTT-99

    RyanTT-99 TS Member

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    Hey I would like to know why Remington stopped making the 90T???
    Was their problems with them, were they over priced???
    Just curious.
    Thanks
     
  2. short shucker

    short shucker TS Member

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    They didn't sell very well when new.

    ss
     
  3. acorange

    acorange Well-Known Member

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    Don't know why they quit making them but I always thought that they were a great shotgun. My Dad owned one for awhile but he got rid of it, why I don't know.
    He shot it as good as anything else he owned.
    Kolar of Racine, Wisc. built these for Remington.
    If I remember correctly about 3600 were built but I am sure some one else who knows more about these fine shotguns will correct me if I am wrong.
     
  4. 320090T

    320090T Well-Known Member

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    About 3800 guns were produced. I know definitely there were no serial numbers over 4000.
    The production serial numbers started with ST00100. There are a few guns less than that, but they were all special orders, and not all of them had "real" numbers. Some of the "numbers" had the owners initials as part of the serial number, some had birthdates, some had wedding dates.
    All of the guns produced were produced with the same quality, from start to finish. True, there were some changes.....
    Maybe to serial number 1200-ish, the bores were larger, around .747"-.755". This was impart because Remington furnished the blanks already hammer forged to .745". With consecutive bbl shipments, they kept tightening them up at our (Kolar Arms) request. Eventually, we were able to provide a finished bore at .742"-.745", with about .033" choke.
    The hi-rib adjustable 90-T had tighter bores from the start...738" with .040" choke.
    A mechanical change took place around serial number 2600, give or take 150. This change was to replace the 10 degree angle of the locking bolt and the lugs on the bbl to 8 degrees. The 10 degree angle definitely gave the life of the bolt maybe 40k rounds, but at 20k or so, it would no longer hold itself to the bbl lugs, and it would want to pop out of the lugs during a shot.(the top lever would move). With the 8 degree angle it would not. This may have shortened the life a bit, but still, 30k-35k is still a lot of shooting. Most all break-open guns are that anyway.
    The forend update you may hear or read about from me was never done to any gun during production. I started doing them while I was still at Kolar, but it was 2 years after the end of production. The angled little "shoe" was/is the weak link in the gun. I was replacing some as many as 2-3 times a year on the same gun. The update did away with the sharp angles, and allows the new insert to freely position itself behinf the lug on the bbl squarely.
    As for the wood, the early guns had nice figure with "kind-of" an orange(y) color. As more shipments arrived, the finish darkened up to a more uniform brown. This was to help us not to spend so much time matching buttstocks to forends. The wood was furnished by Reinhart Fajen.
    There were 4 options for wood dimensions....
    #1...1-1/4" MC
    #2...1-3/8" MC
    #3...1-1/2" MC
    #4...1-1/2" straight comb
    All of the hi rib guns had an adjustable stock.
    Early production guns could be had as special orders, with many options...adj combs, adj pads, porting, choke tubes(Kolar tubes), extra triggers, release triggers, extra bbls(including a few 32" bbls).
    I belive it was 1991 that 50 guns were produced for the ATA, one for each state. They had a little engraving on them, including the shape of the corresponding state on one sideplate and the ATA logo on the other. I don't recall how they were serialized (maybe someone may have one and could fill this part in).
    Not all of the "state" guns were sold, and they were sent back to Remington and parted out. During the big regime change at Remington, the employees were able to piece guns back together and purchase any firearm that was still available in the warehouse. So, some of those parted out "state" guns got put back into circualation, but with mis-matched parts.
    I hope this helps fill in any holes to the 90-T lovers (I love my 90-T).
    Doug Braker
     
  5. rodbuster

    rodbuster TS Member

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    Wow, great post Doug. Thank you for the info. It seems like whenever I see someone shooting a 90T, they are shooting it very well. They seem to be a very sturdy firearm.
     
  6. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    I believe the 90T didn't survive because the average trapshooter felt that they cost too much "for a Remington" and the low sales numbers just didn't fit into the company's mass-production/high-volume game plan. The 3200 and the 32 before it suffered the same fate. Beretta is experiencing the same thing with their DT-10 - people feel a price that approaches that of a Perazzi is too much to pay for a lowly Beretta. All are very high-quality guns, however, and were and are worth the money.

    Those ATA Hall of fame guns were serial numbered in the order the state came into the Union. The gun for Delaware, the first state, was #DE01. A local shooter bought South Carolina's and it is numbered SC08. Those guns were sold at each state shoot by silent auction. The opening bid was $3,300 and in the case of the South Carolina gun, a Pennsylvania shooter entered the opening bid "just to get things going" and wound up the proud owner. He sold it unfired a few years later to another local shooter who uses it whenever he shoots. They came in an Americase with Remington green lining and the ATA logo, "Hall of Fame" and (if I recall correctly) the gun's number embroidered in gold on the cover lining.

    A 90T HPAR is on my list of guns I'd like to own. One of these days, if I ever stop buying rifles and 870 Competitions, I'll have one.

    Ed
     
  7. short shucker

    short shucker TS Member

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    rodbuster,

    That is a cut and paste from a post Doug placed on here sometime back. Please don't confuse 320090T with Doug Braker as it would be a great insult to Doug!

    ss
     
  8. spitter

    spitter Well-Known Member TS Supporters

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    Reading Doug's narration, its why I do business with him...

    I know guys who bought new. I know guys who bought from Jacqua's at the bottom - @$1600, and now they're on the rise again, due to their quality... for all intents and purposes a Made in USA Kolar.

    To think the guns are now @15-19 +/- years "new"! Built like brick $hithouses, I've have yet to know of any 90T failing, plus I like the extra weight - little recoil...

    Considering a gun, have questions? PM the GunDR - Doug Braker

    regards all,

    Jay
     
  9. acorange

    acorange Well-Known Member

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    I love the knowledge I get from this site!!
     
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