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question about 357mag and bulls eye shooting?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Joey S., Jan 6, 2010.

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  1. Joey  S.

    Joey S. TS Member

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    I just received a 357 colt python from a friend. I think I would like to try
    Bullseye shooting over the winter. My question is, if I were to reload for this
    pistol, do I use brass from a 38 special or do I use 357 brass and reduce the load to sub mag levels? Mag loads are not allowed at the range. Please excuse
    my ignorance. Thanks, Joe S.
     
  2. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania
    Either will work fine but 38 Special brass is a lot cheaper. However, I had one .357 that shot target loads out of .357 brass more accurately than the same load in 38 Special brass. I was told the jump to the forcing cone being shorter was the reason for that but I also placed well in PPC matches (297x300) with both a 6" Python and an 8-3/8" Model 14 with 3.5 grains (I think) of Bullseye under a cast 148-grain hollow-base wad cutter in 38 special brass.

    Ed
     
  3. BigDave1200

    BigDave1200 Member

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    You can use 38spl in a 357 mag. I have only know one person that loaded 357 brass with a target recipe. Everyone else just uses a 38spl target load. If you are going to reload your own, 38spl brass is real cheap compared to 357. Hope this helps.
     
  4. Big Dave

    Big Dave Member

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    Most will Say go with the 38 brass, it's cheaper and unless you are striving for extreme accuracy, and shooting from a rest, the little bit of travel the bullet has to make before it enters the rifling will be negligent.
     
  5. Anchorsteam

    Anchorsteam TS Member

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    Shoot the Bullseye event with a light-loaded .38 Special with Wadcutter bullets. Keep the velocity below 1000fps and you will not 'lead' the barrel. Do not use .357 brass - use .38 spl. It is a shorter cartridge and you'll not have erratic ignition issues that sometimes happen with a large volume case with a lo-volume powder fill. Read up on Bullseye shooting & reloading - interestingly, one of the best Bullseye powders is: Bullseye:^)
     
  6. ExFedex

    ExFedex Active Member

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    By no means am I a pistol shooter but I do have some experience with shooting a .38 Spl. in a .357 Mag. revolver. In my SW M19 there was a pressure loss and velocity drop brought about by the jump from cylinder to forcing cone. Being a recoil wimp I loaded .38 Spl. wadcutters down to the 700fps level as shown in published data. I bulged a nickel plated 6" barrel by firing a bullet into a barrel plugged by the previous bullet. My local S&W repair guy pointed out that if it had been a 4" or shorter barrel all would have been fine. Later I did find a warning about low velocity and longer barrels in my Speer"s reloading manual. Am glad I never tried putting a full power .357 Mag into that revolver.
     
  7. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    Ditto Ed.....Bob Dodd
     
  8. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    2.7 grains of bulls eye powder and a 148 grain hollow base wad cutter is the standard target load for the 38 special. HMB
     
  9. brent375hh

    brent375hh TS Member

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    Just load a full WC long enough to start into the throat with 38 brass, that is how I load mine. I use 3.1 WW231
     
  10. dflo

    dflo Member

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    2nd 3.1 of 231 and 148 hollow base wad cutter. My ppc gun is sub 1.5 inch groups at 50 yards and a ransom rest.
     
  11. Joey  S.

    Joey S. TS Member

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    Thanks guys! I was worried about "jumping the gap". How do you determine how far down to seat the bullet? Joe S.
     
  12. tom-n8ies

    tom-n8ies Member

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    The further you set the bullet out the lower your velocity will be so you will need more powder than the loading manuals call for to make up the difference.

    I would just seat the full wadcutters flush and follow published load data.

    You could always experiment with seating depth if you are not satisfied with flush seated wadcutters accuracy but they will be kind of ugly with the lube grooves showing. I doubt it will be worth the trouble and extra powder expense.

    Get yourself a tornado brush for removing buildup in the cylinder they work great for when you want to go back to 357's.

    tom
     
  13. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    The thing about those .38 special mid range loads is they use a tiney bit of fast burning powder to produce consistent velocity and good accuracy. To get that small amount of powder to do this, it it necessary to take up as much of the internal case volume as possible with the bullet. Hence the cylindrical bullet shape and the flush seating. Actually the seating depth should be just below flush with the case mouth lightly crimped over the shoulder of the bullet. A special top punch is required to do that and if you don't have one contact the die maker to get one.

    BTW, these wadcutter loads are also great for plinking and small game shooting.
     
  14. Savage99Stan

    Savage99Stan Active Member

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    Buy a Lyman 358156 mould, cast your own bullets, load them in 38 special cases and crimp in the lower of the two crimp grooves and you'll have a 357 length cartridge for your Python...btw, the Python doesn't have as long a cylinder as most 357s so the "jump" isn't as long.

    My three favorite loads with that bullet (it is a gas check, by the way) are about 2.7 to 3 grains of Bullseye for a target load, five grains of Unique for a "walk around" load good for the occasional chuck, bunny, or squirrel down at the farm, and 13 grains to 13.5 of 2400 for "serious" work...the first crimped in the top groove, the other two in the lower one, all in 38 special cases. The last load listed was fantastically accurate in my old six inch Security Six.

    357447 lyman can also be loaded this way but it runs about ten grains heavier in weight.
     
  15. Savage99Stan

    Savage99Stan Active Member

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    A couple of additional thoughts..the Python is known for its excellent accuracy, mostly due to three things: the double lockup of the cylinder which keeps it immobile when the trigger is pressed, the tapered bore which gets slightly tighter as the bullet nears the muzzle, and finally, most are blessed with a pretty good single action pull.

    In my idiocy, I let an original six incher go when I thought I needed a Ruger convertible so I could shoot cheap nines along with the 357s, and the second, a four incher, which I don't regret losing as my kid sure likes it.

    The full wadcutters will group in one hole out of most pythons at twenty five yards from a good solid rest.
     
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