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Question About 223 Brass

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Recoil Sissy, Jan 23, 2010.

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  1. Recoil Sissy

    Recoil Sissy Well-Known Member

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    Gentlemen:

    I recently scrounged a small quantity of .223 brass from a local range where law enforcement trains. I know for certain the officers were training with brand new Sig Sauer semi-auto rifles.

    I intend to give the brass to a friend who loads .223. However, after cleaning the brass I noticed 100% has a small but noticable dent about 3/4 inch up from the base. In addition, the mouth/neck is partially collapsed on more than half of it.

    I have three questions...

    1. Am I correct in thinking simple neck resizing will cure the mouth deformation?

    2. Are the dents in the body of the brass any real problem?

    3. I'm positive the dings occured as the guns cycled and before the brass hit the ground. Is this sort of thing common with semi-auto .223?

    sissy
     
  2. Jollytrapshooter

    Jollytrapshooter Member

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    This is quite common with semi-auto rifles. AR's are known for denting necks on brass. If the neck just has a small flat side to it, a resizing die should have no problems straightening it out. The dings aren't that big of a deal either, the only thing it will affect is the case capacity. So unless you're friend loads a compressed or near compressed load, he shouldn't have any problems. They will be gone after the first firing. Hope this helps, Josh.
     
  3. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    It might effect case life some

    Now military brass has a couple of other issues- some of it has crimped primer pockets- and you can ream those out- but why bother unless you enjoy workiing with it

    The other issue is that a lot of times the neck thickness on military brass will be greater - which means greater pressure unless you ream the inside of the neck -- again why bother if you have other brass for use

    regards from Iowa

    Gene
     
  4. TOOLMAKER 251

    TOOLMAKER 251 Active Member

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    Gene, The neck thickness of the military brass vs commercial brass is not the problem, it's in the rest of the case mainly around the web area.
     
  5. Recoil Sissy

    Recoil Sissy Well-Known Member

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    GN7777777:

    If I'm following your point, you're referring to mil spec stuff with Berdan primers. I did a quick google on Berdan and was reminded Berdan primers are crimped in and the base of Berdan cases have two flash holes instead of one.

    The brass I scrounged has a single flash hole. Am I safe in assuming it's not military? If it matters or helps, the head stamp markings are a small circle (like a letter "O") with a plus sign + in the middle and 'LC 08'.

    sissy
     
  6. TOOLMAKER 251

    TOOLMAKER 251 Active Member

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    Sissy, I never seen any 5.56 berdan brass, not that there might be so out there. Gene means, on the military brass yhe primer is swedge in and the primer pocket has to be resized before pushing a new primer in. This is boxer primer ammo, not Berdan.
     
  7. Anchorsteam

    Anchorsteam TS Member

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    Dillon makes a nice heavy decapping tool for punching out crimped military primers. They also have the swaging tool to prep the primer pocket to accept a new primer - mount them both directly to your bench - but maybe my decapper was a super duty die, I can;t remember. I have loaded a fair amount of spent GI machine gun .308 brass and I had to have those special tools. The MG brass was slightly heavier than standard .308 rifle brass and you lost a little case volume because of it, but for run of the mill ammo, it was not a problem. The cases you have are likely same spec as standard .223 fodder. Sounds like you have Lake City 2008 production mouse gun ammo, boxer primed. Load it, love it, shoot it.
     
  8. bt 99

    bt 99 TS Member

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    RCS--I just posted some info on thread (any rifle loaders out there) on millitary ammo.

    From your description the circle and the stamp would suggest to me that this is indeed military brass. (LC 08) I think would be from the Lake City ordanance plant maybe in Salt Lake City???

    It can be loaded very well but be carefull with the amount of powder you use. The brass probably is thicker which will mean more pressure. When loading always stay a few grains from maximum listed loading data. It also is a good idea to weigh the clean, deprimed shell and compare them with a regular shell. The more they weigh the less powder used. Steve
     
  9. V10

    V10 Well-Known Member

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    The Lake City AAP is in Independence, Missouri.
     
  10. Anchorsteam

    Anchorsteam TS Member

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    ctreay...yes - I have that Lee die as well. I originally said it was a 'Dillon' - but it's Lee. My primer pocket swager is Dillon. What an awesome rig. Punched out those primers like butter.
     
  11. Recoil Sissy

    Recoil Sissy Well-Known Member

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    Gentlemen:

    Thanks for the answers, comments, and education. As you can tell, reloading for rifles isn't my thing.

    Your input is very much appreciated. Thanks again!

    sissy
     
  12. Leo

    Leo Well-Known Member

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    I shot Sedrvice rifle for a number of years. Unlike 30-06 and 7.62 brass, Lake City 5.56 brass has the same thickness, thus same loading data as US made commercial. Good Luck
     
  13. Kerz

    Kerz Member

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    Am I correct in thinking simple neck resizing will cure the mouth deformation? Yesw should not be a problem

    2. Are the dents in the body of the brass any real problem? No, would not think so

    3. I'm positive the dings occured as the guns cycled and before the brass hit the ground. Is this sort of thing common with semi-auto .223? Some, maybe more with the Sig.
    Vic
    Ashland KY
     
  14. Remstar311

    Remstar311 Member

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    If you just neck size they may not fit into the chamber of the next gun. I suggest that you go to full sizing dies. I have two different 22-250 and I don't neck size cause I'll be woodchuckin with cartridges that don't fit 50% of the time. Especially from a shooting range the brass came from a few different .223s I imagine.
     
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