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PW 900 Primer Track Repair

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by gunner x, Jun 22, 2009.

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  1. gunner x

    gunner x TS Member

    Joined:
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    Need assistance Please,

    PW 900, primer track, just below primer tray, where the primers start their
    fall, that metal has torn, forcing the track out of alignment with the feed
    tray. How does one make that repair or must it be a replacement.

    Whiz and or Somebody to the rescue.

    Thanks for Sharing,

    Gunnerx
     
  2. Carol Lister

    Carol Lister TS Member

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    We had one repaired, twice, by a rather good welder. The repair was to the track where it joined the tray. It had not broken quite through so the welder simply repaired the crack. The repair, however, stiffened the area and hastened the second failure at the same location.

    The second repair he made has lasted two years now and shows no signs of failure. The welder found a flexible, narrow-bladed stainless steel spatula and cut a section from the blade the width of the track and about 3 inches long. He bent the blade section into an arc and attached one end to the tray and the other to the track so that the two were now joined by a much longer and more flexible piece. He was careful to correctly position the tray and the track before attaching the blade section which he tacked with a few spot welds near the ends of the blade. It now forms the hinge between the two parts of the assembly.

    Ultimately, for the cost of the two repairs we should have bought a new one immediately. We did eventually purchase a spare and had a talk by phone with the woman who assembles the presses at the factory. She explained how to install the unit to minimize the stress that causes the failures... a most helpful person.

    Carol Lister
     
  3. gunner x

    gunner x TS Member

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    Hello Carol,

    What care was required when securing the new Track and Tray.

    Gunnerx
     
  4. sharhope

    sharhope Member

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    I repaired mine with JB weld and built up the repair over the tab area still going strong
     
  5. gunner x

    gunner x TS Member

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    JB Weld, sounds interesting. Where to purchase, I assume a Auto Parts store
    and or hardware store.

    Thanks Sharger, hmmmm JB weld.
    Gunnerx
     
  6. Carol Lister

    Carol Lister TS Member

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    <blockquote>"What care was required when securing the new Track and Tray."</blockquote>

    The second time the piece cracked there was misalignment between the two parts. The welder didn't want to completely separate them but he had to make sure they were properly aligned with each other before he welded the patch in place because it would be very tough to get to all parts of the crack to grind it smooth it he put it together sloppy. He put the tray face down on a welding slab and put a weight on it. He used a flexible arm to position the track exactly where he wanted it then used a little clamp to fasten the patch to the chute. He tacked the chute first to the tray and then to the track.

    This is the repair:<center>

    [​IMG]</img></center>
    <center>The crack has been left unrepaired. The splice now aligns the parts and provides the hinge. The welding that is visible under the splice is from the first repair.</center>


    <center>[​IMG]</img></center>

    <center>The splice material is just sligtly thinner that the tray and track by a few thousandths of an inch.</center>

    <center>[​IMG]</img></center>

    The repair has to be flexible as the track and tray move in relation to each other. Restrict the movement between the two and cracks will occur someplace else.

    Carol Lister
     
  7. gunner x

    gunner x TS Member

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    JB Weld, sounds interesting. Where to purchase, I assume a Auto Parts store
    and or hardware store.

    Thanks Sharger, hmmmm JB weld.
    Gunnerx
     
  8. gunner x

    gunner x TS Member

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    Hey Carol,

    Thanks for the information and photo's. Well done.

    Gunnerex
     
  9. Carol Lister

    Carol Lister TS Member

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    You're welcome. I think the spatula that was used may have been a cheapo artist's pallet knife.

    Lister
     
  10. whiz white

    whiz white Strong Supporter of Trapshooting Banned

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    Rapid City SD
    It needs to be spot-welded.

    I used to have these done at one of the high schools here.

    Whiz
     
  11. cubancigar2000

    cubancigar2000 Well-Known Member

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    Just a thought!! Maybe putting JB Weld on and around the area before a problem arises is a good safeguard???
     
  12. Ahab

    Ahab Well-Known Member

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    Mine finally broke, so I just called PW and ordered a new one...took all of 2 minutes to replace the old one.
     
  13. Carol Lister

    Carol Lister TS Member

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    <blockquote>"Just a thought!! Maybe putting JB Weld on and around the area before a problem arises is a good safeguard???"</blockquote>
    Making that part of the assembly rigid will simply shift the stresses somewhere else. It's a bad design to begin with. Any design that relies on the flexing of metal to provide a hinge is set up to fail eventually. When ours broke the first time we played with the idea of actually creating a hinge where the stress caused the crack. Ultimately we just used the solution in my photos because the previous welds had embrittled the steel.

    Carol Lister
     
  14. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    Carol, Wouldn't an actual hinge work? Why didn't you follow through with the hinge idea? They will all fail eventually, they have to. That assembly is due for a factory redesign. They should at least use spring steel.
     
  15. Carol Lister

    Carol Lister TS Member

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    <blockquote>"Carol, Wouldn't an actual hinge work? Why didn't you follow through with the hinge idea?"</blockquote>
    We can't see any reason why a hinge would not work but we had difficulties coming up with a design that would allow for a smooth transition from the tray to the track and that could be welded to both of them.

    We tried to make a hinge out of thin stainless steel but we couldn't cut it as we wanted and we couldn't bend it sharply enough to create a hinge with minimal slop in it. We had better luck with thin tinplate but we couldn't get it welded to the stainless properly

    The we went "low tech" and thought of using a strip of leather for the hinge. We could use epoxy to attach it to the metal but to keep the the tray and the track correctly positioned, we needed to apply glue very close to the point where the hinge would bend. We had trouble controlling the spread of the adhesive and it usually glued the tray and track together.

    In the end, the welder suggested that we just spread the bending stress over a larger area. That's what we did. He's now playing with the idea of using the same wide-radius piece as a hinge but not welding it to the track or tray so that there will be no localized stress points as there are now.

    Carol Lister
     
  16. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Carol- I see that you and I have a common characteristic. We will go to some trouble and spend a lot of time figuring out how to repair something rather than buy a new part. I have often repaired something several times before I figure out how to do it right. I have even repaired parts when I have a new part in hand. Is there something wrong with us?

    Pat Ireland
     
  17. Carol Lister

    Carol Lister TS Member

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    Pat- There probably is... but I don't see myself in a hurry to find a fix for that.

    Carol Lister
     
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