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PW 800+ vs 2000

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by robervl, Mar 30, 2010.

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  1. robervl

    robervl TS Member

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    Which is the better press? How many shells can you expect to turn out before repair is needed?
     
  2. The Rock

    The Rock Active Member

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    Better?? Depends on your need. As to how long I don't know mine has not needed repair, and I got used.. I have updated with the crimp dies and quick change bushings and large hopper it being it is an 800B but so far only thing I have done in the way of repair is replace the wad finger guide.

    Rock

    Jim
     
  3. Pat McKean

    Pat McKean Active Member

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    Location:
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    I've got a Platinum 2000 I bought about nine years ago and the spacer/roller bearing (item 91 on the assembly exploded view from the manual) wears a flat spot on it after about 2500 rounds, causing the machine to not index. As long as I replace this part on a regular basis, the machine works fine.
     
  4. Gary Waalkes

    Gary Waalkes Well-Known Member

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    Mr. Jim "Whiz" White did a comparison and put it on this site.
    http://www.trapshooters.com/swsupply/Basic_Reloader_Differences.pdf

    The second question (when will a repair be needed) is really a non-issue in my opinion.
     
  5. JTEA

    JTEA Member

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    Location:
    So. East corner PA
    I have experience with a MEC Grabber. Hornady 366 (without indexing) - about wore out my thumb rotating plate, good for fooling with individual and test loads and two PW's.


    Ponsness 800B which I converted to C using Spolar crimp and final crimp - works great. It was rebuilt at the factory, then sold to a guy who screwed up the indexing. I got it at a good price and it took about half an hour to figure out what was going on an correct the indexing. Eventually, after tens of thousands of rounds I replaced the resizing dies due to some variation in the diameters. Also well worth the trouble and cost. It must have many 100K's of shells through it during it's life. I modified the primer feed so it's a little higher angle and the primers run down the ramp better. I have replaced the wad fingers several times. It actually runs a little quicker than the 900 Elite as it has a shorter stroke for the handle.

    PW Size-O-Matic 900 which I also picked up used and in excellent shape. It's a good loader for quick changes of the powder and shot bushings. (changing system could also be added to an 800 unit). The full length resizing dies are the only way to go in my book. I can change loads and usually not have to fool with the primer set, wad set, crimp etc. - unlike the 800. It can be a pain to get them set correctly on any loader. It's common for me to run 600 > 800 rounds flawlessly. Recently the large spring in the final crimp stage broke, replaced with a $1.80 spring from the hardware store. (micrometer for size and cut to length) Took 20 - 30 minutes once I realized what happened etc. This model has a center post where the indexing (automatic turning) function works. There is a small bushing in the rod which indexes that I have replaced a couple times in the past decade. Not expensive, when it goes you will have it catching and not running smooth. I also modified the primer feed so it's a little higher as well.

    Try http://www.jimsearneye.com/ponsnesswarren.html for more info. / rebuilt models etc.

    Old thread with more info. / worth reading:
    History of P/W loader and there progression??


    http://www.trapshooters.com/webtv/cfpages/thread_archive.cfm?threadid=150578&Messages=17


    best, JT
     
  6. whiz white

    whiz white Strong Supporter of Trapshooting Banned

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    Thanks, Gary, for posting my article.

    I have to say that most folks who experience "needed repairs" are users of the older machines. I see and hear so many, many times from folks who are using machines 30-40 years old. Yes, they do need repairs & maintenance, just as you would expect with a 30-40 year old vehicle.

    I have loaded on Platinums and 800 Plus machines since they came out on the market, and the only repairs I needed were from operator error. Because I also use a hydraulic, and because I proto-type lots of items, I can really bust some things. However, if I were to simply reload and not try to make parts that I think are "cool," I would have to say that I could reloader around 20,000-30,000 before I would expect anything to need fixing. Possibly a new $2.49 wad guide finger on an annual basis would be in order, and perhaps a new Wad Guide Cam Botl ($9.95).

    Current models ONLY include the Platinum 2000 and the 800 Plus, all others are out of production, and the old 800B, 800C, and 800CVT are obsolete, in that the factory is no longer making specific parts for these. The worst case scenario would be that a new primer seating assembly is in order. But, because these are no longer available for the 800B/C/CVT machines, you would need to install a crosshead for the 800 Plus, and then you could get the new externally adjustable Brass Primer Seating Assembly.

    Toolheads from the 800 Plus *will* work on the 800B/C/CVT machines, HOWEVER, you cannot change gauges due to a design difference. There is one exception, but it is moot.

    Buy a new 800 Plus (I'm biased because I prefer the aluminum turret to the Grivory) for $800 or a new Spolar for $1600, both are great machines, and never look back. You can easily reload 1,000 rounds in an hour if you pay attention.

    Whiz White
     
  7. Pat McKean

    Pat McKean Active Member

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    Location:
    Alta California
    I loaded for many years on my MEC 650 Jr. until I met my wife in 1998. Needless to say I did not have as much free time on my hands as I used to, so in 2001 I upgraded to the Platinum 2000. Last weekend I did the calculation for how much I'd saved (money) by reloading all these years on my reloader, and it paid for itself in a year- not too bad! I saved much more time also by using the progressive machine, so I don't even figure in my time, after all, it's a hobby.


    I'll never give up reloading- so many ways to get exactly what I want and at half the price of new shells.


    What's not to like?
     
  8. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Pat McKean- Yes the roller bearing will wear and cause indexing problems. A new bearing is around $1.50. I get around 10,000 shells from one bearing. The last time I ordered a bearing from Whiz he also sent me a new screw that holds the bearing in place. He said I needed one and he was right. A worn screw will wear the bearing quickly. I suggest that the next time you change the bearing, also change the screw. Neither part is expensive.

    Pat Ireland
     
  9. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    I wanted to express my appreciation for making me aware of the roller bearing mentioned. After 40K trouble free rounds on my Platinum I felt compelled to check mine out. That bearing is a pita to get to and reassemble. I found absolutely no visible wear on mine. Hard to believe anyone is only getting 2500 rounds or even 10k. But I do frequently lube the groove on the center shaft. gee, thanks
     
  10. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Jerry- A trick to putting the bearing back in is to fill an area of the slot with enough grease to hold the bearing in place while the screw is inserted. I do only get around 10,000 loads from a bearing but I use a hydraulic system. This puts more pressure on the bearing, especially when something goes wrong, than operating the machine by hand.

    Pat Ireland
     
  11. threedeuces

    threedeuces TS Member

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    I have not loaded on a Spolar or a Mec but have all the others. I now own a P/W 800+ that has auto case feeder and an electric drive hooked to it and it is as good as it gets for me. I load on it all the time and all I have to do is turn the switches on and go. Never a problem or adjustment needed. The only thing I have ever found wrong with it is keeping the damn thing filled with components.
     
  12. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    Pat, I thought of using grease but i rested a long allen wrench on the machine with the short end up in the center post groove and then rested the bushing on top of that. It didn't move that way. That should all go in from the front. I'm glad I learned about it anyway.

    I would never go with hydraulics because of damage potential. I will operate the machine by hand as long as I am able.
     
  13. Pat McKean

    Pat McKean Active Member

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    The problem with the bushing, the groove, and the screw/pin is it's a tolerance stack up problem between the three.


    In the least material condition (LMC) there is too much clearance, and it won't index. I haven't seen the maximum material condition, where everything fits with just enough clearance.



    Just to check, last time I wrapped Al foil around the screw to take up that clearance and put in the bushing rotated 180 degrees away from the worn flat and it worked fine for 400 loads until the foil wore out.



    I ordered two new bushings from P-W. One was at the LMC and it did not work from the get - go. The other one was a little better, and I loaded 1200 rounds with it, until the maching again did not index.



    I sent them back to P-W with the bushings and a letter explaining what I'd done, and did not hear another word from them.



    I can have a new bushing made that will fit my machine exactly, but on Tuesday, I found Oilite bushings that will fit my pin and groove exactly from Small Parts, Inc., and they came today, ten each for about 35 cents apiece. I'm going to give them a try.



    I've kept the whole assembly well greased with the STOS grease, which is very good for many things.
     
  14. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Pat- Please let me know how your substitute bushings work out.

    Pat Ireland
     
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