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Pump Shotguns

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by siletzherb, Feb 13, 2012.

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  1. siletzherb

    siletzherb TS Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2012
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    I am new to this kind shooting. I got a chance to shoot a couple of years ago with a friend in Wisconsin and used an over/under remimington. I really enjoyed the experience and I actually did ok. I recently went to a local shoot and did miserably. I was shooting a pump and it seems like there is alot more coordination involved. Are there any techniques that relate to a person shooting a pump as opposed to an o/u?
    Thanks Herbert Jennings
     
  2. dead on 4

    dead on 4 Well-Known Member

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    3,070
    Your pump may be a field gun which is less suited to the trap game than a trap gun. The main difference are the stock dimensions which allow the stock to be mounted and head placed on the comb first before calling for the target; where as the field stock is dynamic bringing the comb under your eye and the stock into your shoulder in one fluid move while making your shot on game.

    If you gun has field dimensions, you might try renting or borrowing a trap gun and see if this is an improvement.

    Surfer
     
  3. Ross

    Ross Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,646
    deadon4 gave good advise,,,, and go back to the club, talk--ask questions--make some new friends, I'm sure most shooters would "will" give you some pointers and let you compare your pump gun to their SBT--O&U--semi auto that are set-up for trapshooting. There is nothing wrong with a pump even if it is a field grade, a field grade usually shoots pretty "flat" so you may have to almost cover the target but if you break targets with it that's what counts. The target will never know (or care) if it was hit with a promo or re-load or premium shell or a $200.00 or $10.000 shotgun. This game has more to do with the Indian than the arrow. Watch--listen --ask--learn, WELCOME to a great sport, warning VERY addictive. grin-- Ross Puls

    P.S. I have tried most everything on the market and still shoot an old Remington pump.
     
  4. MisterHappy

    MisterHappy Member

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    Jun 18, 2010
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    It all comes down to fit - no fit, no hit.

    Just as each maker's size 12 boots will be a dit different, so too shotguns.

    There's nothing "wrong" with a field gun - at my club the most recent long run (125+) was shot with an 870; the previuos (also 125+) was shot with a Winchester autoloader that my late dad got for duck hunting (not by me - by my kid, who;s a better shot, the little punk! LOL)

    The suggestion of trying on different guns is spot-on. A gun that's not "adjustable" is made for the "average" shooter's measurements - if you deviate, it won't work well for you.

    Concentrate on finding agun that fits, and you'll be all set. An experineced trap shooter can help you with that.

    good shooting
     
  5. psfive

    psfive Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2006
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    672
    You need to know if the gun you are shooting is shooting where you are looking. Take it to the pattern board with someone who will help you find that out. Paul in Nebraska.
     
  6. siletzherb

    siletzherb TS Member

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    Thanks for the info everyone. My gun is a marlin 120 mxr magnum, so I suppose it is a field grade. I didn't realize that the stock configuration was different for field grade guns and trap guns. I clearly am more familiar with rifles than shotguns. This is all new to me.
    Herbert Jennings
     
  7. Grasshopper

    Grasshopper TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    17
    Yes Siletzherb, all that gun fit talk from the others is spot on. One of the added benifits to proper gun fit is LESS felt recoil as well ... in the shoulder and in the cheek bone too. In this game, recoil is definitely not your friend!

    Once you finally get a gun to fit you and you also determine it HITs where you're pointing it, then it's time to practice, practice, practice ... while employing a PROPER form and technique. Get one of the good shooters at a gun club to show you what proper technique is.

    You never want to practice a BAD technique!

    The targets won't care whether you're breaking them with a plain barreled pump or a high-ribbed Perazzi. We usually buy the nice stuff to treat ourselves, it's not because something less fancy won't work.

    Incidentally, trap guns are normally designed to shoot their patterns high ...not flat like the typical hunting gun, though there are some exceptions out there. In this game, the target is usually on the rise when you shoot at it, thus, the higher shooting trap gun already has the vertical lead designed into it. It allows the shooter to keep the bird in full view while he or she points the gun and fires.

    Having said all this, I've seen more than a few old timers with their well-worn, flat-shooting, stove pipe barreled model 12 pumps shoot some incredible scores. They'll usually wander in when a club is putting on a meat shoot and they'll go home with more than their share of hams and turkeys. They shoot their old shotgun like it's an extension of their arm. So field guns can and do work for some.

    Welcome to the sport!
     
  8. Hill topper

    Hill topper Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    547
    You can do like we did in the day.
    Build up the comb with some" mole skin" and see what that does for you.
    If your breaks increase you know what you need to do.
    A cheap way to get by untill you are ready to make a change in equipment.

    ed
     
  9. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    3,715
    As important as the differing dimensions of field guns is the light weight of field guns. What you want in a target gun is a relatively heavy but well balanced gun. If it is well balanced it doesn't feel heavy. The weight gives the gun "discipline", that is based on inertia. You want a gun that once started moving on the target line will continue moving, to encourage complete follow through of your move to the target. A light gun starts and stops effortlessly, and stopping the gun is one of the two cardinal sins of target shooting, the other being head lifting.
     
  10. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    Sep 30, 2007
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    Location:
    Wauwatosa Wisconsin
    You have been given some good advice. I live in Milwaukee Wisconsin and I am a long time Remington 870 pump shooter. What type of pump gun are you shooting? Do you live in Wisconsin?
    Steve Balistreri
     
  11. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    9,442
    Try to find a used trap gun that is for sale. Shoot it and if it is user friendly, buy it. HMB
     
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