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Pull Trigger VS Release Trigger

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by tomc66, Oct 30, 2009.

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  1. tomc66

    tomc66 Member

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    What is a "pull" trigger and what is a "release" trigger? Which one is better? Advantages and disadvantages?
     
  2. Trap2

    Trap2 Well-Known Member

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    "Plop" goes the lure and as the ripples start to ebb... Look out, here comes one now.....
     
  3. Steinkruger

    Steinkruger TS Member

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    use a pull trigger. it is just where your simply pull the trigger towards you and the gun goes off. on a release, you pull the trigger to set it and then when you are ready to shoot you release the trigger. use the pull trigger
     
  4. RickN

    RickN Well-Known Member

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    I think release is better...but I've been using one since back in my slingshot shooting days.
     
  5. Shooter100

    Shooter100 TS Member

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    I'm with RickN on this one

    Harry
     
  6. fssberson

    fssberson Active Member

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    Here is a post from another thread a few weeks ago.

    "It just so happens that I got the following note late last week from a friend that he received from one of his friends. I did a couple of minor edits to protect their identities but the rest is presented as written. It's got nothing to do with flinching but it sure makes a strong case about release triggers.

    "Hey XXXXXXX,

    As you know, I took up Trapshooting a little more than 4 years ago using an old model 12 trap gun that was loaned to me by a friend. However, after I had demonstrated a commitment to the game, my father in law sent me an over/under. By chance, it had both release and pull dropout triggers. While I knew nothing about release triggers and had never flinched, I thought why not give it a try. One of the guys at the club where I shoot showed me how to use it. Bingo. Within a couple of rounds I was shooting better than I had ever shot before. I soon gave ATA a try. I liked it and within XX months I was shooting AA/27.

    I have watched the arguments about release triggers on TS.com for quite a while. I never felt qualified to jump in and participate because most of these arguments referred to flinching rather than just whether a release trigger is a better method of firing a trap gun. Because I had never had a problem with flinching, I do not understand anything about that problem. However, here is where it gets interesting. I have a very unique job. I am a team coordinator/referee/slave driver/mother hen for a team of exceptionally educated, experienced professionals representing a variety of engineering, medical, psychological and research disciplines. Our business is rocket science and brain surgery so to speak.

    We are all employed by a major aerospace firm and while some of what we do is highly classified, most of it is of a standard commercial nature. What we do is provide independent testing for human interface control systems to determine if those controls are designed in such a manner as to eliminate as much probability of human error as possible. Simply put, this might just be whether it is better for a two way toggle switch to have up as off and down as on or vice versa. However, think of the control array in a 737 cockpit, the space shuttle or a nuclear power plant and that is what people pay us a lot of money to test. We usually have about 10 people on a team and we bill at $8000-$10,000 per hour.

    About once a quarter we try to get the team out of the labs and into a more natural setting. I decided that a day at my trap club might be a lot of fun. I recruited a friend to help me with getting the guys to the line and shooting, and hopefully, hitting some targets. We had four trap guns, three with pull triggers and mine with the release. I was surprised at how easily some of the guys took to shooting the release. Afterwards, as we were sitting around enjoying chili dogs, the guys who used the release trigger started asking questions as to why my gun had a release and the other guns had pulled triggers. I gave the standard overview concerning flinching. However, these guys immediately were interested in whether a release trigger is a better human control interface for firing a trap gun. Much discussion ensued and everyone had a great time bringing their particular discipline to bear, but being research scientists no one would accept a resolution without specific testing.

    A couple of weeks later, we had cleared the decks for a large contract concerning a fire control system for a shipboard missile defense system. The package was to arrive on the appointed morning and we had completed constructing our testing protocols. However, as I was conducting what I thought was the final check list meeting, we were notified that their might be a delay in delivery. Somehow the conversation flowed back to the outing at the trap club and then the discussion about release triggers. About that time, we were notified that delivery would be delayed at least 24 hours. So here is all this high-priced talent with nothing to do so someone suggested why not apply our talents to a release trigger review. Needless to say, numerous bets were quickly made. Having previously received security clearance to bring my trap gun into the employee parking lot, I happened to have my gun in my trunk. A quick call to security and I and my trap gun were being escorted into the lab.

    Soon, we had several volunteers with wires attached from their trigger fingers, up their arms, on their spinal column and all over their heads. Others were studying the mechanical forces required and exerted by the two different triggers. Data was collected in the number crunching began. After a bit over five hours of research we had our answer.

    Our typical project results in a document that runs from 20 pages for something very simple to several hundred pages for multiple function control arrays. However, while these reports are very helpful for the design and manufacturing teams, we have devised a simple ratio to present so that non-technical management people can quickly appreciate the value propositions of one system versus another. To do this we assign the least desirable functionality a value of one. We then assign the better functionality a value of plus one. By example, if we have found that the up is the worst position for "on" for the toggle switch then we might say that having "off" is a 1.14 better choice. We call this the better alternative ratio.

    Because most of the products/systems that we test our very well designed with a lot of previous knowledge applied, our alternative ratio is usually fairly low. In fact, previously the highest alternative ratio that we have estimated for a manual control was a 2.67. Now, drumroll, the release trigger came back with a better alternative ratio compared to the pull trigger of 3.27 based upon a projected 100 repetitions in a 45 minute time frame. Quite frankly I was shocked at how big the difference was. Even though I had seen my shooting improve after getting the gun with the release trigger, there were lots of other variables that I am sure contributed to that progress

    In summary, we produced a result that someone would have had to pay us about $45,000 to achieve. While I can't add anything to the discussion about flinching, I think I can categorically state that a release trigger provides a substantial biomechanical superiority to a pull trigger for shooting a trap gun.

    Of course, we all know that many of the best trapshooters successfully use pull triggers and achieve 99% plus results. We also know that the majority of release trigger users will never achieve 99% plus results. However, if I were going to train 100 qualified candidates that can fly fighter jets to shoot trap, every one of them would have a gun with a release trigger."
     
  7. Francis Marion

    Francis Marion Well-Known Member

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    SSSHHHHHH, listen carefully, 221 is on his way.
     
  8. Allen-MX8

    Allen-MX8 Member

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    Thank you for the information.

    However, I think I will keep my pull trigger on my Perazzi.

    Allen
     
  9. Hoosier Daddy

    Hoosier Daddy TS Member

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    You know I have to agree with the post by NHSC. I had no real issues with pulling a trigger. I can still switch back and forth with little problem. But I use a release because my scores are better with a release. I couldn't say why until now and I couldn't repeat what NHSC said in a conversation but it is easier for me to release than to pull.
     
  10. no5shooter

    no5shooter Member

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    I saw the title of this thread and thought "Oh Boy, here we go again!" Now I have to thank tomc66 for asking the question and NHSC for the great essay. I actually saw that piece of work on an earlier thread dealing with the same subject but either I didn't/couldn't read the whole thing or it just didn't penetrate, but this time it all makes sense and presents a heck of an argument for a release trigger whether or not a shooter has ever flinched.

    The slingshot comment was spot on and I guess we'd have to include bows too, wouldn't we? Wonder if recurvyarcher uses a release on her shottygun...
     
  11. ric3677

    ric3677 Well-Known Member

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    Yes, Devi uses a release.

    Rick in Mt.
     
  12. Jon Reitz

    Jon Reitz Well-Known Member

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    And Ole Ollie Dawg will be here before I can click on "SUBMIT MESSAGE".

    "WOOF - WOOF"!
     
  13. oleolliedawg

    oleolliedawg Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    Jon, no, I won't!!
     
  14. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    Regarding that abovementioned and infamous older thread, our good friend "221" plays an important role in my February column.

    Ed
     
  15. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    After getting brain damage from shooting a shotgun with a bad pull trigger, trap shooters switch to a release trigger. This usually helps their performance.

    Most shotgun manufacturers produce pull triggers with excessive creep, this coupled with a heavy and sometimes inconsistent weight of pull causes the shooter to flinch. Sometimes this flinching problem can be solved by switching to a release trigger. HMB
     
  16. ric3677

    ric3677 Well-Known Member

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    I always thought that TM-1 perazzi trigger had alot of creep. That's why I am shooting a release now.

    Rick in Mt.
     
  17. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    Thanks NHSC.
     
  18. W.P.T.

    W.P.T. TS Member

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    I will not dispute it but really doubt that anyone got the clearance to bring a gun into a heavy security lab of any Aero Space firm in this day and age, unless they were guarding the President of the United States ... This would be considered to be a Major Breech of security at best and would probably cost someone their job ... The results of the testing is flawed unless someone set off a shot with out intending to do so, it happens all the time ... WPT ... (YAC) ...


    Good read though ...
     
  19. Dickgshot

    Dickgshot Well-Known Member

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    All shooters who shoot a release have the same complaint.

    "i should have changed sooner."
     
  20. RHAT

    RHAT Member

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    I shot trap with a pull trigger for 5 years,...... my highest singles average was 85,..... about year ago one of the old shooters at the club told me I might do better with a release,....... I ordered one for my Kolar,...... the week it came in ,..... I shot a 95 ,...... then went on to shoot my next 2000 reg targets with a average of 97,.......so for me it worked quite well,...... I went from a D class to AA ,...... 20yd to 25 all in one year,.......

    for me it's all in the results,.... i've never pulled a trigger sence i got the release

    R
     
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