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PULL TRIGGER VS. RELEASE TRIGGER????

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by senior smoke, Oct 10, 2007.

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  1. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    HELLO:
    a very good shooter told me that it is more natural for a shooter to use a release trigger than a pull trigger. he felt even if you don't flinch you should switch to a release. a former gun club owner once wrote," if you need to switch to a release trigger, maybe it's time to get out of the sport. he felt the release trigger was dangerous. WHAT IS YOUR OPINION IN THIS MATTER?
     
  2. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    A release trigger is not dangerous. Their may be a few who operate a release trigger dangerously but fortunately, I have not seen them.

    I would not recommend changing to a release trigger unless needed. I have no idea what the phrase "it is more NATURAL to release a trigger than pull a trigger" means. Would that imply that a pull trigger is unnatural? It does take less effort to release a trigger but only after the trigger has been pulled.

    I do shoot a release trigger. Release triggers reduced my flinching from 4-5 per hundred to about 1 per 2,000.

    Pat Ireland
     
  3. esoxhunter

    esoxhunter Well-Known Member

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    I used to say, "I will quit shooting before going to a release trigger". After developing the dreaded flinch and shooting horrible scores, I contemplated quitting, as it wasn't fun anymore. A fellow shooter talked me into trying a release. The release made shooting fun again. I am glad I listened to this fellow shooter; as I enjoy shooting and did not want to quit. People who give advice, like the "former gun club owner", should keep their comments to themselves unless they have facts to back up their statements. In summation like Pat, I flinched at least 5-6 times per 100 targets (Sometimes more). There were times I could not pull the trigger or finally pulled it when they target was on the way down. Release triggers help those that need one. AND they are no more dangerous than a pull trigger. All loaded guns need to be pointed downrange, no matter what trigger is installed in the gun. My opinion. Ed
     
  4. fritzi93

    fritzi93 TS Member

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    At our club there is a not-so-exclusive group that hands out gag membership cards for shooting the traphouse. All use pull triggers and many have honorary "punches". I shoot a release and am not a member of the aforementioned group. I too fail to see how releases are inherently more dangerous than pull.

    I recall only one AD with a release where it was my fault. OTOH, when my 391 release started pulling through, I let off a couple, always downrange. Didn't use it after that until it was corrected. A properly functioning release is fine, if it needs repair/adjustment, get it fixed pronto.
     
  5. Tron

    Tron Supporting Vendor Supporting Vendor

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    At the end of the day, you will never ever see a pull trigger user handed a green bucket of paint and a brush by the club management.

    Tron
     
  6. oleolliedawg

    oleolliedawg Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    I don't know any release trigger shooters who didn't wish they could still pull one.

    As the late, great Frank Little once said, "if you can't pull one and can't release one-take up Fishing"!!
     
  7. oleolliedawg

    oleolliedawg Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    brownk80, you're still a rookie. Let's see if you'll still say that in another 5 years and I hope you never develop a set flinch!!
     
  8. Charles L. Schmidt

    Charles L. Schmidt TS Member

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    I switched to a release without ever flinching. And yes I find it to be a much more natural function than pulling a trigger. It seems very smooth and effortless. I'll never go back to a pull trigger.

    Although... I have a very difficult time using a release trigger on a static target (pattern board). cls
     
  9. hubcap

    hubcap TS Member

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    The only time I ever saw anyone shoot the traphouse it was with a pull trigger.
     
  10. fearlessfain

    fearlessfain TS Member

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    after forty five years of shotgun shooting i have yet to flinch, and most all trap guns right out of the box fit perfectly. i care nothing for aftermarket modifications of any kind,i guess that i'm really lucky.
     
  11. fritzi93

    fritzi93 TS Member

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    Tron, that is utter nonsense. I see pull trigger shooters nail the traphouse quite often.

    [EDIT] Clarification: By "often", I mean several times a year.
     
  12. Kingbang

    Kingbang TS Member

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    I guess im one of the lucky few. I was shooting for less than a year with a pull trigger and the gun went bad in the 05 PITA shoot. It was the only gun I had and I had to buy another. It was a 3200 and had a release. It to took me no time to get used to it. I had it go off twice in a year, and only when I was set over the house and just relaxed a litte to much before calling for the bird. To me? its a no brainer! its alot easier to relax your trigger finger a scoosh than pull it some? One has to be more carefull. If a release goes bad and you can't disarm it without it going off? (happened to me) you have to be always thinking of gun management, release or none truth be told.

    Dennis
     
  13. Cherokee Kid

    Cherokee Kid TS Member

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    Pat,

    Can you explain why pulling a trigger is more natural than releasing a trigger? Perhaps you know why triggers were designed as pull originally and you can share that with us. Or, maybe if the first triggers were designed as release would release then be more natural?
     
  14. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Cherokee Kid- I did question one poster who stated that using a release trigger is more natural. My question was directed at the use of the word natural to describe releasing or pulling a trigger. My position is that either pulling or releasing a trigger is a learned skill, not a natural reaction present at birth.

    Pat Ireland
     
  15. fritzi93

    fritzi93 TS Member

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    If you have enough "greenhorns" at your club at any one time you can expect your traphouses to get shot occasionally. Leave them out of this.

    Among the folks I regularly shoot with, I can think of nearly 20 release shooters. All but one are very experienced, including a former Maryland State champion, several times. The one exception is a senior vet who started shooting about 5 years ago, and yes, he's shot the traphouse a few times. Only once have I seen any of the experienced release shooters do it. That fellow was test-firing a hunting gun with...a pull trigger. (BTW, many release shooters say that as long as they DON'T pre-mount the gun, they have no problem hunting with a pull trigger. That's true for me as well.)

    OTOH, I can recall off the top of my head several pull shooters (among well over a hundred I know), who can be counted on to shoot a traphouse at least once a year. Experienced shooters who fire at least 5,000 rounds/year.

    Probably not enough of a sample for meaningful statistics, but I don't see anything suggestive of a pattern there. Just my observations, your experience may be different.
     
  16. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Most shotguns have terrible pull triggers. They creep, they have the wrong weight of pull, and some are inconsistent. Some or all of these defects lead to flinching.

    Most shotgun triggers are in the stoneage. I started as a rifle shooter and I cannot imagine spending thousands of dollars for a gun and not be able to adjust the trigger. For example an Anschutz target rifle has a removeable trigger which is adjustable 18 different ways. A replacement costs about $300, compare that to a $10,000 dollar shotgun whose trigger costs $1000 to replace and is nonadjustable.

    Bad triggers are the leading cause of flinching IMHO. HMB
     
  17. djpk69

    djpk69 TS Member

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    As far as "shooting the traphouse".....I would venture to say that most"errant" shots are done by "newby" shooters rather than "seasoned" shooters....and that more "seasoned" shooters use release triggers than "newbys".Thus, there shouldn't be any comparing of apples to oranges...i.e , yes more newbies may shoot the traphouse with pull triggers but??? they're newbies. I consider myself a "newbie, but have never misfired...however, I find it interesting that it takes more muscles to pull than to release.I think I would like to try one.
    .
     
  18. oleolliedawg

    oleolliedawg Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    OK, I may have destroyed a few grasshoppers and ants with my release trigger equipped K-80.

    So what!!
     
  19. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    I shoot into the air now and then with my release trigger equipped with a K-80.

    Pat Ireland
     
  20. maclellan1911

    maclellan1911 TS Member

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    all triggers are dangerous when shooters are not practicing gun safty. finger should not be on trigger until set up and ready to call for the bird. Pull or release. Simple.
     
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