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proud americans- worth reading

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by jakearoo, Sep 3, 2007.

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  1. jakearoo

    jakearoo Active Member

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    Dead bang false. See Snopes. http://www.snopes.com/military/marvin.asp
     
  2. buzzgun

    buzzgun Member

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    I love this one. Quite possibly more than any other piece of internet hooey I've ever seen.

    Classic. Pure, unadulterated B.S., a beautiful sight to behold.

    Please come back and post in a year.
     
  3. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

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    Just in case those that choose to believe these fairy tale do not believe Snopes try another source

    "Lee Marvin was a U.S. Marine and was awarded a purple heart for his service and wounds while in combat fighting Japanese on Saipan in 1944, during the Marianas campaign. He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia, with honors by a greatful country."

    "Bob Keeshan (Captain Kangaroo and Clarabell the Clown) volunteered and served honorably in the U.S. Marines when he was 17 years old during World War II."

    The source is above in the website URL. There are a lot more of the Hollywood types on this site as well.

    Bob Lawless
     
  4. Phil E

    Phil E TS Member

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    Fabricated, but there are some elements of truth to it. Phil E
     
  5. Paladin

    Paladin Well-Known Member

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    Thank you Bob Lawless.
     
  6. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

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    Paladin your welcome. I thought that it was a pretty interesting site especially the article about Neville Brand.

    "Neville Brand enlisted at 16 and emerged the 4th most decorated GI in WWII. He participated in the Ardennes, Rhineland, and Central European campaigns, and received the Silver star for gallantry in combat. Sergeant Brand was wounded in action by the Weser River, felled by a gunshot to his upper right arm. His other awards and decorations are the Purple Heart, the Good Conduct Medal, the American Defense Service Ribbon, the European/African/Middle Eastern Theater Ribbon with three Battle Stars, one Overseas Service Bar, one Service Stripe, and the Combat Infantryman's Badge."

    Bob Lawless
     
  7. Chichay

    Chichay TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Thank you, Bob Lawless. Hollywood mirrors what the country has become (or is it the other way around?) as demonstrated by the picture at the bottom of your link: the only one standing is the one in the wheelchair (as the American flag in the parade went by). Cesar
     
  8. pendennis

    pendennis Well-Known Member

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    If any of you get the opportunity, or haven't do so, visit the US Air Force Museum in Dayton. The numbers of actors who served is amazing. Jackie Coogan, Jimmy Stewart, and Clark Gable, among others.

    Just two years ago, Eddie Albert passed away. He was a real hero during WWII. I read the recount of him and his boat, rescuing and resupplying Marines at the battle of Tarawa in 1943. It seems hardly enough for him to get only a Bronze Star for his heroism.

    Clark Gable was grounded by Hap Arnold for risking capture or death while filming documentaries in the Army Air Corps.

    It is amazing that these men were such heroes, and never mentioned their exploits. Such are real men.

    I had the honor to meet Walt Ehlers when I worked at Ford. You would have never known that he won the Medal of Honor during the Normandy Campaign. He is a most unassuming man to have received such high honor.

    Best,
    Dennis

    Corrected - 09/06/2007

    Thanks for the heads up.
     
  9. PhillyD

    PhillyD Member

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    Dennis
    Just to make a correction, not trying to be a jerk. It is not the CONGRESSIONAL MEDAL OF HONOR.It is the 'Medal of Honor'. No congressional. Somehow that 'Congressional' word has come into play over the years referering to the medal. But it is the 'Medal of Honor'.Almost everyone says Congressional. Not correct.

    Phil Del Monti
     
  10. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

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    PhillyD you said "But it is the 'Medal of Honor'.Almost everyone says Congressional. Not correct." just for the sake of argument. It is not incorrect either because the CMH as it is referred to is "Presented by the President in the Name of the Congress" you may be right that it is referred to as The Medal of Honor but if it is presented in the name of Congress I would think that fact alone makes it Congressional.

    Bob Lawless
     
  11. PhillyD

    PhillyD Member

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    Bob, not to get into a pissing contest ( that is surely not my intent).I don't know if you are quoting the Medal of Honor website where it is said "It is also refered to as the Congressional Medal of Honor because it is presented by the President through congress. I was an Honor Guard for 11 months when I returned from the Vietnam War (1969) and on several ocassions I witnessed soldiers "put on the carpet" for saying 'Congressional' when refering to the 'Medal of Honor'. (Most articles you read do not refer to the 'Medal of Honor' as Congressional.They read 'Medal of Honor'. (As the Hollywood web page does about Audy Murphy).My intent is not to come off as a "Know it all". I was just relateing what was told to me while in the service. Bob I guess no matter how you say it, it is one of the hightest Honors a person can get. God Bless America and the fighting men and women who protect us and our families everyday.......... Philly D
     
  12. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

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    PhillyD I am sorry for the delay in replying. I do not know about any of what you have written as to being put on the carpet etc. etc I do know that nothing surprises me when it comes to the military. There are however other people involved in the Nations Higest Award for Valor. One of these is called the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation who's web URL I have added above.

    Another is http://www.cmohs.org/community/links.htm this is the web URL for Congressional Medal of Honor Society these are just a couple of organizations that see fit to Call the decoration CMoH if they have no problem with it than the military shouldn't either. For that matter neither should you.

    Some here liked and seem to enjoy the URL's I posted about Hollywood types in war time here are a few more that you may get a kick out of.

    The first one however always brings a tear to my eyes.

    http://www.fdnylodd.com/BloodofHeroes.html

    http://www.audiemurphy.com/

    http://www.bpfrommer.com/For~All~Our~Heroes~Section.htm

    http://www.bpfrommer.com/A~Soldier's~Heart.htm

    http://www.b-29s-over-korea.com/index.html#heroes

    Check them out and enjoy.

    Bob Lawless
     
  13. PhillyD

    PhillyD Member

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    Bob, this is right out of the wikipedia encyclopedia. If you go to this site it will confirm that I was correct in my original statement, "It is not correct to use "Congressinal" with Medal of Honor Here is the Quote. "Although Common place the term "Congressional Medal of Honor" is not correct".
    Bob you stated "I (meaning me) should not or the Military should not have a problem with it if the CMOH Society sees fit to use Congressinal".I guess the reason the military and I have a problem with it is because it is incorrect to use by the proof I have used below. If people will not accept the explanation below as fact then I guess there is really not much more I can say to prove my point.
    This is not the first time I have had to defend myself about this Congressinal thing. As I have stated in my first post, "alot of people use Congressinal when refering to the Medal of Honor......... But that doesn't make it correct.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medal_of_Honor



    "There are two distinct means for awarding the Medal of Honor. The first and most common is nomination by a service member in the chain of command, followed by approval at each level of command. The other method is nomination by a member of Congress (generally at the request of a constituent) and approval by a special act of Congress. In either case, the Medal of Honor is presented by the President on behalf of the Congress. Although commonplace,[4] the term "Congressional Medal of Honor" is not correct.[20] The Congressional Medal of Honor Society is so named because that is the name it was given in an act of Congress signed into law by President Eisenhower on August 5, 1958 as 36 U.S.C. ยง 33.[21] The law authorizing the society has since been transferred to Title 36, Chapter 405 of the U.S. Code"

    Bob thanks for listing those web sites. I'll give them a look.

    Phillip Del Monti
     
  14. PhillyD

    PhillyD Member

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    Bob The phrase, 'Being put on the carpet' was a phrase used when you were going to be reprimended for something the Army thought you did wrong. I thought it was a well known 'catch phrase'. I guess not.

    Phil Del Monti
     
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