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Protect Your Gun Against Water

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by phirel, Jul 31, 2009.

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  1. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Guns have a decorative water proof finish on the outside, but many have raw wood inside the forearm, where the wood meets the receiver and between the stock and recoil pad. These unprotected areas readily allow rain water and oil to get into the wood and we all seem to shoot in the rain now and then. Oil from the receiver has ruined many stocks.

    A small paint brush, a rag and a small can of about any type of wood finish can add a lot of protection. A fast drying finish (I like sander-sealer, but anything will work) can be applied quickly to these surfaces and any overrun is just wiped off with a rag. One coat will soak into the wood and is usually all that is necessary. This is important protection your gun should have.

    Pat Ireland
     
  2. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    Especially your duck gun, the butt will take on water through the joint where the pad meets the wood. I have an 1100 with cute little scallops in that area, LOL.

    I would use floor urethane or similar behind the pad, and in the bolt hole.

    HM
     
  3. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    HM- Thanks, I forgot about the bolt hole.

    Pat Ireland
     
  4. Pipe Layer

    Pipe Layer Well-Known Member

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    Pat, Just a good spray with furniture polish on all the wood when you clean your gun does OK and will not hurt the metal either.
    Terry
     
  5. BT-100dc

    BT-100dc Active Member

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    EE: You're right; Tru-oil is great for the job. Also, it's good if you want your forearm to have a tighter fit. After I use the Tru-oil, once dried, I use some paste floor wax like the old Johnson paste wax in a can. I believe you can purchase the wax at Lowes for around $7.00; there's enough to wax your guns and furniture for years--great stuff. The wax also prevents the high gloss finishes on Brownings from cracking. Used it for over 30 years. BT-100dc
     
  6. Duck

    Duck Member

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    HM,

    Truer words were never spoken, I broke a wood push pole year's ago damn near got impaled on it to boot. Of course no oar's were present, my bad!. Water was to cold to paddle by hand so the 1100 was pressed into service, looked exactly as you described including some milky streak's!. I have'nt bought a wood work gun since!.
     
  7. Carol Lister

    Carol Lister TS Member

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    The gunsmith that does our annuals recommended that we go to an auto parts store and by a small aerosol can of automotive clear coat touch-up paint. We've used it inside stocks and fore arms and to seal checkering. If you need to apply it by other than spraying, spray some into a makeshift aluminum foil cup and pick it up with a brush.

    Lister
     
  8. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Water on wood ain't no good.

    Pat Ireland
     
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