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Properly Measuring LOP (nose to thumb)

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by LukeG, Aug 16, 2009.

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  1. LukeG

    LukeG Member

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    When measuring length of pull and using the nose to thumb method, is it the tip of the nose to the closest part of the hand? Or is it closest part of the nose to closest part of the thumb?

    Just want to be sure I am measuring this correctly.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    1" to 1/14" from the tip of your nose to the thumb. If your thumb bumps your nose, add length. Some of us are great "neck stretchers", so just try to be comfortable.
     
  3. BigM-Perazzi

    BigM-Perazzi Well-Known Member

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    to the first knuckle, the one attached to the palm of your hand...
     
  4. KENENT1

    KENENT1 Active Member

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    you need to have a someone look at you when you mount the gun........I just had a stock fit by Dennis Devault.....as they added length to the stock I keep climing the stock without thinking about it...the more they added the more I moved forward....so a second opinion is worth it.


    tony
     
  5. GunDr

    GunDr Well-Known Member

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    I feel no more than 1" and no closer if you're getting a bloody nose.

    Doug
     
  6. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    As a rule of thumb, that's not a very workable "rule" for all. Pinocchio may have problems, long neck people too, then there's those with the pudgier face no nose types. A proper LOP is dependent on several things which are as different as individual body forms in my opinion.

    Most of us are highly adept at fitting ourselves to a new shotgun depending on how well it catches our fancy, rather than how well it truly fits us? I consider LOP important for a variety of reasons. First and foremost is comfort when shooting a lot of shells during a 300 target day. The continual hammering of recoil on tensed shoulder muscles makes for a very long day! The trick is figuring out how to get your proper LOP for shooting comfort for those long days and not a nose only measurement.

    Hap
     
  7. Dickgshot

    Dickgshot Well-Known Member

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    Some of the best shooters in the world, especially in sporting clays, have their head so far forward on the stock that they have to keep their thumb next to their forefinger on the opposite side of the stock to avoid hitting their nose.
     
  8. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

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    With a pool of millions of people to fit, how can these "rules of thumb" truly be accuratte? This measurement may be worth looking at for comfort's sake, but I think using this as an important evidence of proper gun fit is right there with using the "inside elbow to trigger" measurement.
     
  9. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    wireguy- I agree with you. People are built differently. Some are short, some tall. Some have impressive bellies, others have inconspicuous bellies. There is as much variation in the distance between the thumb and nose as there is in the difference in height of people.

    Pat Ireland
     
  10. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    I don't think body shapes and size has anything at all to do with how shooters prepare for their next shot or mount their gun. The ease, difficulty or speed of game being shot does that in my opinion. International bunker? twice as fast (close enough) leaving the trap as an ATA target, much wider angles too. I think those are the reasons shooters began tilting the head far forward and leaning into the gun a lot for reaction quickness to a difficult target. Could the same thing be said for some of the sporting clays guys, I think so for the same reasons. One more point, neither of those games require a shooter to fire at 300 plus targets per day of competition as does ATA competitive shoots? The best shooters for the games being shot will come up with a system that works best for them and is copied by many. It's a monkey-see, monkey-do training regiment for a lot of shooters, not what may be the best LOP for them. JMHOs Hap
     
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