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Problems W/Recoil Pads on Stored Guns in Cabinet?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by train222, Jul 24, 2010.

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  1. train222

    train222 Well-Known Member

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    Hello All,

    I was wondering if any of you ever had any problems with the recoil pads on your shotguns or rifles that you have standing up-right in your gun cabinets.

    I just recenley noticed that my shotguns that have a decelorator pads (soft rubber) are getting out of shape and are flatting out. They also show line indention on the corners. Even some of the hard rubber Browning and Pacmyer pads are also flatting out, but not as bad.

    When the pressure is taken off of the pad, do they normally come back to thier original shape?

    Is there any way to restore the shape to the Decelorator pads?

    Other than put the guns in thier cases or hang them horizontally (don't have the space to do this), is thier any way to solve this problem...

    Any help will be greatley appreciated...

    Thanks,

    Stu Gabriel (MrGun)
     
  2. cubancigar2000

    cubancigar2000 Well-Known Member

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    Stu it is a fact of life and no they will not come back normally. Years ago my grandfather made me some wooden pegs that I insterted in the screw holes so the guns rest on the pegs. This has worked for me for over 40 years. I am sure there are other solutuins but this is one that was passed on to me by my grandad
     
  3. W.R.Buchanan

    W.R.Buchanan Member

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    Stu: I think age affects recoil pads more than anything. Also if the gun is used frequently the pads tend to remain more flexible over a period of time.

    I recently got my Husqvarna 30-06 out of the safe and installed a scope on it. It had a new Pachmyer pad on it when I put it in the safe.

    I hadn't shot this gun for 30 years and let me tell you what. I was done in 6 rounds and my shoulder was BLACK for a week.

    The pad was as hard as wood. New pad coming from Brownells!

    I have shot 100 rnds of factory ammo thru this gun in one afternoon with nothing more than a Tee shirt in between. No no ill effects at all. So the pad was definately the culprit.

    However my 1964 A5 has the same pad and it is painless to shoot, I think just because it has been used regularly and kept mushy.

    I haven't seen any obvious deformation from sitting in the safe for long periods of time, but the dried out pad sure did hurt me.

    Randy
     
  4. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    Stu. Store them on their nose. Most of the compression "set" will leave after about a month. The rest is there till you change pads.

    Closets and safes are true "recoil reducers"
     
  5. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Another advantage of storing the gun with the barrel down is that it helps prevent oil from damaging the wood next to the receiver. This type of damage is very common on some fine old shotguns.

    Pat Ireland
     
  6. OLD ONE EYE

    OLD ONE EYE Well-Known Member

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    Pat is right on stand them barrel down so many stocks damaged from oil or grease draining down into the stocks.

    Buddy
     
  7. Mike Hessong* (MH*)

    Mike Hessong* (MH*) Active Member

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    Here's a picture of my "upside down" gun rack I had built to stop the very thing you are describing. I "lost" many older guns recoil pads just like y'all are talking about and also wanting to keep from what Pat Ireland was talking about too, keeping the oil out of the stocks. I just had a cabinetmaker make the top slots a little wider and lined them with some ultra-suede so it wouldn't marr the wood, keep everything barrel-down, Works well. Mike* (MH*)
     
  8. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    One of the recoil pad makers used to include a short piece of metal ron with a rubber pad on one end. You inserted the support in one of the pad's screw holes so the gun rested on the support's pad instead of the recoil pad. I have a couple of them but can't recall what company provided them.

    A golf tee might do the same thing.

    Ed
     
  9. cottondoctor

    cottondoctor Member

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    Pat Ireland is right on - I have been storing guns muzzle down for many years....I learned the trick over 40 years ago when I was an NRA and DCM High Power competitor – storing rifles muzzle down helps prevent oils – solvents etc. from oozing into the bedding area – which would significantly affect accuracy or life of a bedding job…………I carried the practice over to all my long guns – rifles, trap guns, sporting shotguns, black powder etc etc…..

    Now – a word to the wise……storing your gums muzzle down leaves them “top-heavy” in the safe or rack……use caution to prevent them from falling and doing significant damage to stocks – scopes – etc…………I installed a “gate” in my safe – so just in case when I open the safe door nothing falls out---
     
  10. train222

    train222 Well-Known Member

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    Hello All,

    I would like to thank all of you for your suggestions...

    Storing the shotguns on thier nose is not an option for me. We are taking about a lot of shotguns in several differnt cabinets. The shotguns can not be stored that way in these cabinets.

    I was thinking of getting a strip of high density (semi-ridged foam) and putting that in the bottoman of each cabinet. Then set the shotguns on top of foam. Do you think that this will help solve the problem and protect the recoil pads or am I spinning my wheels?

    I guess, if that will not work, than putting something into the screw holes to elevate them, would be the thing to go with.

    Again, thanks for all of your suggestions...

    Stu Gabriel (MrGun)
     
  11. Hitapair

    Hitapair Active Member

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    I put a dense piece of foam rubber between the butt pad and the floor of my gun safe. I also take my guns out and leave them in a horiz position for a couple hours at least twice a yr.
     
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