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Problem: looking back at gun when pulling trigger

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by jrb100, Jan 4, 2009.

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  1. jrb100

    jrb100 Member

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    Jan 16, 2006
    Messages:
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    I am hoping to get advice on the issue that I have been having.I see the target fine and track it fine,then alot of times when I pull the trigger to shoot the target,I either see the barrel of the gun or just a blur.I have been told my gun is stopping also.I notice my elbow drops also after the trigger is pulled.Any advice or explaination would be great. I shoot with 1 eye open.

    thanks,
    joe
     
  2. Maytag

    Maytag TS Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    Frank Little referred to it as bead checking, as well as others on this forum. I've been guilty of it from time to time. Personally, I seem to do it when I do not concentrate fully on the target thru the break. When you do this, you usually stop, or slow down the barrel, thus missing or breaking the target poorly. I've found that I also relax my grip at the same time that I bead check. Stopping these bad habits has been corrected by staying focused on the target thru the break.
     
  3. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    9,556
    Look at the bird with great intensity. Phil K. concentrates on the leading edge of the bird. but I am happy if I just concentrate, each time, on the whole bird. Don't think about breaking the bird. Only think about seeing the bird and let you gun do everything else.

    Pat Ireland
     
  4. jrb100

    jrb100 Member

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    Thanks for the responses.I will try tour suggestions.



    joe
     
  5. Rollin Oswald

    Rollin Oswald Active Member

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    Location:
    Brillion, WI
    You are much more apt to glance back to the barrel when you are only looking in the general area of targets rather than "centering" on them. Centering means that you are looking hard at targets.

    Looking at the leading edge of targets is a good suggestion. Even better is concentrating your vision where you want the center of the pattern to impact the target. It might be at the leading edge or ahead of angled targets.

    Centering can be practiced almost anywhere. Instead of looking at whole things, look at a particular part of them. For example, instead of looking at a picture across the room, look at the corner or at a small object in the picture. Instead of looking at a whole car, look at a tail light or a door handle. The same thing can be done with targets while waiting for your turn to shoot.

    Centering is a learned technique. When you look at something, anything, practice centering your vision on a particular spot on the object. With practice, you will eventually be able to see targets or spots in front of targets. It will increase your shooting accuracy and make bead checking a thing of the past.

    Rollin
     
  6. jrb100

    jrb100 Member

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    rollin,
    I agree with seeing the target along with alot of background.The only time I see ridges on the target somtimes is on hard rights on 4,5 maybe because they cross infront of my right eye.I pick up and hit most of my targets on those stations.I will work on my focus on targets.

    thanks,
    joe
     
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