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Powder/Primers/Lightning

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by tracyhunter, Mar 2, 2012.

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  1. tracyhunter

    tracyhunter Member

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    My reloading room is in a metal building.the powder/primers/reloads are stored in a metal cabinet mounted on a wood wall. can a lightning strike set off the primers / powder/reloads?
     
  2. likes-to-shoot

    likes-to-shoot Well-Known Member

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    We were working in a metal building with big pipes coming out of the floor to some valves and then back into the floor again. One day while we were in the break room during a thunderstorm lighting hit the building. It sounded like the torch blew up. We ran out of the break room and when we found where the lighting hit there was a large burn mark across the concrete floor from one pipe to another one about 15 feet apart.

    I suppose if anything combustible was in its path there would have been a fire.
     
  3. Auctioneer

    Auctioneer Well-Known Member

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    Anything can happen. The sky could fall on your head, you could drown in your shower, your wife could be quiet for a day, you could be hit by a rainbow.

    If your that afraid either ground the building or find something else.
     
  4. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    I agree. Nothing wrong with being safe but don't let it consume you to the point of being paranoid.
     
  5. ctreay

    ctreay Member

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    Location:
    Northern New York
    Did you ever hear of ball lightning? When my wife was a young girl she saw it. They were having breakfast when a ball of fire came out of an outlet on the counter, went across the counter and hit the sink faucets. My father in law sait it scorched the paint on the wall by the outlet.

    ctreay
     
  6. Leo

    Leo Well-Known Member

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    Direct hits on power lines happen, and like ctreay said, it does some weird things along the way. Oil refineries and fuel storage facilities take all kinds of technical precautions and still loose sometimes. A metal building out by itself would be more likely to get hit than if it was surrounded by other buildings. A non direct hit where the lightning hits something else and travels often causes a fire. Any sudden fire could light powder or primers, or paint, thinner or gasoline. But the chances are generally pretty slim. Keep your insurance paid up.
     
  7. Johnny

    Johnny Well-Known Member

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    tracyhunter , If the building gets hit by lightning, the powder and primers will be the least of your worries.
     
  8. slic lee

    slic lee Active Member

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    Location:
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    Auctioneer-any and all of the subjects mentioned by everyone are possible in any and all combinations EXCEPT ONE her being quiet for at least one or two minutes. Lee
     
  9. kgp912kgp

    kgp912kgp Active Member

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    I say donate them so that they won't be any danger to your reloaders.
     
  10. hehawboy

    hehawboy Member

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    Should never store primers and powder in the same cabinet anyway!!
     
  11. pyrdek

    pyrdek Well-Known Member

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    I worked as a chief transmitter engineer in a TV station for a number of years. Lighting hitting the tower adjacent to the building was an every storm thing. USUALLY it did nothing but make a load noise HOWEVER on two different occasions, in spite of 20 foot long ground rounds driven in at all three verticals on the tower and at each each of the guy line anchors, each with 00 (as I recall) copper ground wire, it made it into the building. Once it came in on the copper outer 6 1/8" "pipe" that was the outer conductor of the coax. That strike made a MOST IMPRESSIVE set of fireworks inside the rear room of the transmitter complex. It left scorched marks on a number of ceiling and wall metal beams but didn't really cause any significant damage.

    The other time however, WELL, it ripped out a whole lot of stuff in the entire transmitter and control room. It seemed as near as we could tell, that it jumped into some power lines for the tower lighting system and backtracked it into the building proper. That was a mess! No real physical damage like burns or such but a hell of a lot of equipment to have to be replaced or, in a few instance mechanical stuff, repaired.

    There is only one rule about what lightening will do. That rule is "Lightening will do whatever it darn well wants to do!!!"
     
  12. Hunter1978

    Hunter1978 Member

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    Ground your building by driving some copper grounding rods into the ground and atach to the metal building with cable. Not that it will eliminate all possible risk but should make it a little safer. Stay away from those grounds though durring a thunderstorm. I was about six feet away from one when it hit our house. All I saw was a blue glow befor being knocked out. lucky for me I just woke up a little sore and numb. The grass around the ground rod was burned. Not a real fun experience. Also have lost a few cattle over the years from lightning strikes.
     
  13. Johnny

    Johnny Well-Known Member

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    Hunter, Were the cows medium or well done?
     
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