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Powder costing...please help

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by kiwiG, Dec 17, 2010.

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  1. kiwiG

    kiwiG Member

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    Hi Guys, One for the mathematicians... If 510 grams of powder costs $32, and needs 18grains for a shell, how many shells will be produced, and @ how much per shell? Thanks for the help...I haven't reloaded in 25 years and my calculator is broken. Kind regards-Graham.
     
  2. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    K1W1

    According to google, 512 grams = 7 900 grains

    That will make 438 shells.

    At $0.0729 per shell.

    If I did the math correctly.
     
  3. b12

    b12 Well-Known Member

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    7000 grains to the pound. divide by 18 gr = 388.888 loads. bout .08 pre load.
     
  4. kiwiG

    kiwiG Member

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    Thanks Guys, A bit of discrepancy there, but no big problem. I have some component odds and ends in the cave...everything except powder (which is incredibly expensive here in New Zealand). I have found some for sale and will probably buy it just to use up some of the other junk for practice. Thanks again-Graham.
     
  5. dverna

    dverna Active Member

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    Broken calculator?? Isn't there one on the computer?

    Long division must be a lost "science".

    I still have three slide rules from my youth. They will worth a lot if we have an EMP attack.

    Don Verna

    PS: B12 assumed 1 pound of powder so he is incorrect.
     
  6. Oregunner

    Oregunner Well-Known Member

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    http://10xshooters.com/calculators/Shotshell_Reloading_Cost_Calculator.htm
     
  7. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Don Verna- Would you be interested in adding to your slide rule collection? How about expanding to a collection of log tables? I guarantee that all will work well.

    Pat Ireland
     
  8. dverna

    dverna Active Member

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    Pat,
    You must be an old phart too.

    My favorite is a little K&E pocket model. Add a plastic pocket protector with an assortment of mechanical pencils and Rapidograph pens and I was quite a sight back in the day. I wonder how I managed to stayed single until 27.

    Don Verna
     
  9. oz

    oz Active Member

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    why don't you just use the trapshooters pricing/amount at the beginning of this forum? oz
     
  10. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    Because he had it in GRAMS, not GRAINS.

    And I misread. I thought 512 Grams for some reason

    510 GRAMS of powder times 2.2046 pounds per 1000 grams equals 1.12 pounds, times 7000 grains per pound equals about 7870 grains.

    At 18 grains per shell, that's 437 shells.

    At $32.00 for 437 shells, that's $0.0732 per shell.

    QED
     
  11. b12

    b12 Well-Known Member

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    verna
    I stand corrected. I did assume 1 lb. of powder. Thanks.
     
  12. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    I MUST be getting old. I remember slide rules, still have at least two plus one circular. Straights were good to three significant figures and a circular to four. I also remember my first "electronic pocket calculator". It was over $100, used 8 AA batteries, which lasted about two hours. It was that horrible orange display. Got an HP pocket "computer" a few years later for a few hundred bucks. We've come a LONG way since then. The real trick is to be able to do the calculations without the aid of anything but a pencil and a piece of paper.
     
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