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post setting in concrete: above earth vs in earth

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by quartering, Mar 30, 2011.

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  1. quartering

    quartering Active Member

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    setting posts in rock is hard to do. so i'm wondering if i can't just set the posts on top of the rock, put one of those round, cardboard concrete forming tubes around it and pour a bag or two of mix into the form and get the same results as a post set 18" into the earth and filled with a bag of mix? what's the purpose of digging a hole, anyway? thanks
     
  2. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    What's the pole for?
     
  3. Tron

    Tron Supporting Vendor Supporting Vendor

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    A wooden post set in concrete will rot at the base. How deep you set it in the earth depends on where you live and where the frost line is.

    More info on what you're doing will help.
     
  4. 221

    221 Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    Maybe.....5gal bucket works......sometimes..... all depends

    Purpose for the hole?....ballast, to anchor the post.
     
  5. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    You can use a sono-tube but that would need to have at least 18" of its length set below grade also. That is what keeps the fence or structure from falling over or moving. You see people doing this in place of conventional foundations in really nasty ground or when they want to add on a deck. Not really a fencing deal.

    Either way you gotta do some digging and rock busting - consider renting a pnumatic hammer if you have a bunch of these to do.
     
  6. recurvyarcher

    recurvyarcher Well-Known Member

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    In my experience, they rot in the ground at the base, too, unless you dip them in Creosote first. If you are using the fence to enclose animals, make sure that you only use creosote for the underground portion, though. It's toxic if animals chew on it.
     
  7. 221

    221 Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    Pressure treated posts rot right at the surface of the ground, and above.....what's in the ground or concrete will last almost forever. Pressure treated wood is a no-no around critters.

    What is that black material that they put on horse fence, you see it all over Kentucky?.....I'm having brain fade and can not seem to remember what it is. Pitch, maybe??
     
  8. recurvyarcher

    recurvyarcher Well-Known Member

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    No, pitch is toxic to horses. It's fencecoat black.
     
  9. WarEagle2017

    WarEagle2017 Active Member

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    Like the one post above is asking what is the post for, if it is for a deck there is such a thing sold at Lowes or Home depot that just sits on the ground and you set your post on it, wood rots wherever it is exposed to rain ( wetness ) and then dried repetaly just like a piling on a pier the place it rots is just above the water line, especially in tidal waters
     
  10. quartering

    quartering Active Member

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    trap field cover. 16' x 16'. i want to keep it simple and not have to involve a commercial rock driller. i'm wondering how above ground concrete pylons compare to below ground footings for anchoring a cover of that size. i don't need it flying away. or even scooting around, for that matter. thanks
     
  11. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    If it's solid rock why not just drill into it and attach metal post bases that your wooden supports could then fit into?? All you would need is a drill capable of drilling small holes (3/8", 1/2"??) into the rock then use anchors to attach.

    http://www.ideas-for-deck-designs.com/post-anchors.html

    http://www.deckbuilderoutlet.com/titananchors.html
     
  12. ExFedex

    ExFedex Active Member

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    The black replacement for creosote that is non-toxic to animals might be called WoodGard. Have a 5 Gal. can in my barn but no more animals.
     
  13. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    We did use sono-tubes to set the posts for all our shade structures. These are all fairly substancial stick built structures with trussed roofs so they need to be solidly anchored. We sunk the tubes down about 2' below grade and extended them about 18" above ground . Our 'ground' is a mixture of concrete and asphalt fill so it is pretty nasty. Thank god for pneumatics! The nice thing about setting your posts this way is that you can get them plumb and squared up to each other with realtive ease which will make the rest of your job go alot smoother.
     
  14. 221

    221 Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    Asphalt, is what I'm thinking of .....supply stores in KY had big tanks full of it.
     
  15. recurvyarcher

    recurvyarcher Well-Known Member

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    Look up Fencecoat Black. I don't know if it's WoodGard or not, but for people who have animals, you have to be absolutely certain that it is not toxic when chewed. Fencecoat Black is what they use in KY.

    I know that it's no longer relevant to this thread, because it's for a trap field, but thought that I should post it because I've known horses (not mine or any at my facility) that died as a result of chewing on the wrong wood coating.
     
  16. 221

    221 Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    GEESCH...Sorry I asked......look up asphalt fence coating. There's a lot of horse folks around Lexington that used it, and I think they know what they are doing. Especially when the Queen is in town, you will see hundreds of workers putting it on all their fences.

    Fencecoat Black is paint.
     
  17. porky

    porky TS Member

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    Pressure treated wood put in the ground will eventually rot off at the surface where the ground ends and the air begins. AT&T(verizon) had to go around to every pole in the area because they found the poles rotting at the surface and not underground. I remember that one actually fell on a friend's car when she was driving it. It caused a lot of damage. Verizon fixed the problem by tarring the pole above surface and below surface a bit.
     
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