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Porkupines

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Brian in Oregon, Jan 15, 2012.

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  1. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Definitely salt.

    Here's what you do.... Go to the home improvement center and get some cheap wood stakes, the short ones. Make up a tube of strong salt water, and soak the stakes in it for a week. You'll have to weigh them down since they'll want to float.

    Then pound some of the stakes into the ground in the yard within shooting distance. The porkies will be attracted to the salt content and will chew on them. (I've seen them chew off axe handles to get the salt from sweat.)

    BANG!
     
  2. TEXASZEPHYR

    TEXASZEPHYR Member

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    Definitely what Brian says. Or you could just leave a few boat paddles laying around. They really loved mine should I forget to put them away.

    Bob
     
  3. 4EVRYOUNG

    4EVRYOUNG Member

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    I agree they love salt, the Ranchers I hunt on hate them besuase of it. So why not buy a salt block from the local farm store, to heavey to drag off and starts working instantly, and when porky gets done move closer to the woods Deer like salt to.

    I know people use these blocks in some water softeners so Home Depot may have them.
     
  4. Pocatello

    Pocatello Active Member

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    Yes, get a salt block from a farm/ranch supply store.
     
  5. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Salt blocks work too, but they also attract deer and other wildlife. Which may or may not be a good thing.
     
  6. porky

    porky TS Member

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    I remember as a kid, up in the Adirondacks, the porcupines used to do their work at night mostly. At my Aunt and Uncle's old homestead, the porcupines used to come in at night and chew on the porch. My parents with my Uncle and Aunt, used to get up at night, when we heard them chewing( it was loud ) and the adults would hit them on the nose with bats and axe handles to kill them. The porcupines are not quick movers. There were a lot of them that year because they ran out of places in the garden bury the dead procupines.
     
  7. dhg

    dhg TS Member

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    Bacon rind works great also
     
  8. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Little known fact about porcupines... The indians considered them to be emergency food. If you were in a dire situation you could eat them. After killing them, they'd build a good roaring fire, then roll the porky into it. The fire would burn off all the quills and cook the meat at the same time.

    And I've always been amazed at how much damage porkys can absorb. I've seen them take solid body hits from 30-30s and keep going. I emptied a 45 into one and it kept going across a field, though more slowly. My friend then emptied his 357 into it. It stalled out, wheezing, but its legs kept trying to go. Even a 45-70 does not ensure an instant kill unless you hit them in their brain. And that's just it. Their little pea brain doesn't seem to realize they are, in fact, dead, so it keeps going like the Energizer Bunny.

    And have you ever seen a porcupine skull? They look almost satanic.
     
  9. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Do you have a recipe for porkupine stew? HMB
     
  10. ctreay

    ctreay Member

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    They will also chew on the hydraulic lines of any equipment that you are using in the woods if it is left there to long.

    ctreay
     
  11. Pocatello

    Pocatello Active Member

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    Earlier this fall I was out duck hunting with my young Chesapeake, Rocky. I was just setting out decoys when he came up to me with a face full of quills, and also some in his shoulder. It looked to me like he had gotten to close to a porcupine, which had tagged him in the shoulder, and then he had bitten it. I got most of the quills out of his face and mouth, and some out of his shoulder, but then he started to resist too much so I picked up the decoys and drove home. I called my wife on the way, and when I got home we managed to find a few more in the mouth and shoulder. I then took him to the vet. She didn't find any more, but gave me some antibiotics and pain pills for him. The next day he was still limping, so my wife and I checked him more closely and found two more quills in his shoulder. We pulled those and he healed rapidly. About a week or so later Rocky and I were hunting in the same general area. I knocked down a duck which fell in some thick brush, so we tried to find it. After a minute or so looking he came back to me with a few quills in his chin. I tried to pull them but Rocky wanted no part of it, so again we packed up and headed home. This time my 32 year-old son and I could not restrain him for my wife to pull the quills. I could not believe how strong a 75 lb Chesapeake can be. It was off to the vet again, where she sedated him and pulled the quills. He went the rest of the season without another run-in.

    A friend with a lot of years experience says dogs typically have one of two reactions to porcupines - they either learn quickly to leave them alone, or go into a rage and try to kill every one they encounter. I think Rocky is the first type - at least he didn't try to bite the second one. We have a friend whose female lab was the second type. After several very expensive visits to the vet he finally had to stop hunting with her in any area he might find a porky.
     
  12. Auctioneer

    Auctioneer Well-Known Member

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    See how they like mothballs. If you spread them around the barn they may not like the smell and leave the barn alone.
     
  13. Porcupine

    Porcupine Active Member

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    I am speechless .........

    LA in MA (laying low 'til this blows over, LOL)
     
  14. CalvinMD

    CalvinMD Well-Known Member

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    Brian..thats amazing they can absorb that much firepower and still motorvate ...glad we dont have them here in Md that I know of
     
  15. Bvr Tail

    Bvr Tail Well-Known Member

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    A friend invited me to Pennsylvania for some deer hunting. Some of the relatives couldn't go, so there were just three of us. I killed a very small buck early the first morning, so I stayed around the trailer the second day.

    One of the guys came in and said he wanted to show me a monster rub. We walked to his "rub", and it was a small tree completely stripped of the bark, with small animal tracks at the base.

    I was very surprised that :

    1) This man who grew up in Pennsylvania, and hunted every year, did not know what a deer rub was, and

    2) He had never seen what a porcupine can do to a tree in short order.
     
  16. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    One of the last bounties here in Oregon was paid by a timber company because the trees on their land were being girdled by porcupines. For those who don't know it, girdling a tree is removing a strip of bark from it, all the way around. This eventually kills the tree. The bounty, unfortunately, was only good for residents of that county, so we didn't actively hunt them, but did shoot any we came across while coyote hunting.
     
  17. sliverbulletexpress

    sliverbulletexpress TS Member

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    A 223 with 45 grain hollow points will blow one up like you stuck a hand grenade up it's butt.

    Or if big bore is your thing there is this new 950 JDJ that would probably kill one if you could get a couple of three hits into it.

    Or you could stalk them, crawl up and take them with a stiletto to the brain.
     
  18. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Pocatello's story about his dog's misadventures reminded me of my old yellow dog Bud. Old Bud was a great friend and a very good upland bird dog but he was in group 2 - those on a mission to get revenge. Bud never passed up an opportunity to mix it up with a porqupine and he never won a fight with one either. I always carried a small pair of channel loc pliers just for pulling quills out of Bud's mouth. I got pretty good at pulling quills and even had a technique that involved rolling Bud on his back then holding a stick in the back part of his mouth kind of like a bit for a horse and using my forearm across his neck to pin him down. This allowed one free hand to operate the pliers. I found that the sooner you get to pulling the quills, the easier they come out so most of my 'dog repair' was done on the spot.

    So much for the doctor dog thing but this leaves the matter of the slightly chewed on porcupine which is somewhere nearby and ready for round two. I found that a shotgun blast at about ten feet puts them down right now.

    None of the GSPs that I have (or had) mess with the porquies so I don't have a reason to blast them anymore.
     
  19. William681

    William681 Member

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    My Brother,(det131), and I grew up with a real “boys” dog. (AKA MUTT).. Poochie, yeah, yeah, how original. Mix between Cocker Spaniel and a Basset hound. Toughest most muscular dog I ever saw, built like Swartzenegger. Never chased a rabbit but the best damn pheasant dog you ever did see. Tough little bas----.

    He used to dig out ground hogs, dirt flying everywhere, like a backhoe gone amuck. Many times he came back bloodied, but grinning like a Chesire cat with an unfortunate whistle pig clenched in his jaws.

    He did however develop an affinity for quill pigs. His worst encounter had his face, mouth, and chest covered with hundreds of quills. Vet put him out and spent 3 hours removing all the quills he could. Months later you would be petting him and something sharp would stick your hand. Quills had passed entirely through his body and came out the other side. Dog did not seem to care.

    Bit of advice for removing quills, carry a nail clipper to cut end off quill. They are hollow, if you do not cut them when you try to pull them out the barbs on the tips expand and grip all the tighter.

    Brian in OR.. Did a lot of primitive camping/hunting in my younger days, when I could sleep on the ground and still move the next morning. Back legs and liver of a porcupine are excellent cooked over an open fire, especially in 0 degree temps. Learned the hard way to burn off the quills. How do you skin a porcupine?...very carefully.

    Bill Boston
     
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