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point of impact

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Traders, May 12, 2012.

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  1. Traders

    Traders Member

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    When shooting at a patterning board, how much is the point of impact supposed to be above the point of aim? I know different shooters have different ideas. I am just trying to see what's out there. Also, at what distance is the shooter from the patterning board.
  2. bcnu

    bcnu Active Member

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    yards, I personally prefer the center mass of my pattern to be dead on and about 14 inches high. But everyone is different. Good luck, John
  3. hmb

    hmb Active Member

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    Two inches high at 13 yards. HMB
  4. BigM-Perazzi

    BigM-Perazzi Well-Known Member

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    0 to 18" from 13 to 40 yards! Honest.....those are some of our opinions..
  5. superxjeff

    superxjeff Active Member

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    I like the bottom of my pattern to be right at the point of aim and the rest of it above the point of aim. 100% of my pellets will be above where I am pointing.

    The target is rising so I have difficulty undestanding why you would want pellets under where you are looking. It's one thing about this game that has never made sense to me.

    Guys will loudly proclaim that they would never shoot a 1oz load but they will shoot an 1 1/8 load with a 50/50 impact. If you see the bird and just touch the bottom of it then you are shooting the target with 9/16 of an ounce of shot with an 1 1/8 load. You would be far better off weith a 1oz load and 100% high impact.

    Jeff
  6. W.P.T.

    W.P.T. TS Member

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    5 inches high at 13 yards, 15 inches high at 40 yards ... WPT ... (YAC) ...
  7. Dr.Longshot

    Dr.Longshot Banned

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    At 13 yards on a STEEL GREASE PLATE Pattern board fron shot ricocheting back at you, shoot at an slight angle, make sure no one is on that side of the angle.

    Distance should be 35 yards, as used by Gun Mfgrs. Use your normal sight picture, and put front bead at bottom of the target point from a rest.

    Shoot and then go measure and write down your results for future reference.

    Better yet write it down and take a digital picture w/camera and down load it to your computer.

    Write what tube used, constriction, shot size, Dram of shell and Load 1/1/8th
    1 oz or Etc. Make and Model of gun.

    I keep this info on a gun I shoot well for future comparisions on gun trades
    to compare POI.

    Roll of Meat Packing Paper works well, or the back white side of a roll of Gift Wrapping paper, the wide rolls, if not wide enough use cellophane tape and tape them together.

    Make notes on the paper of the above info, distance Etc.

    Gary Bryant
    Dr.longshot

    Gary Bryant
    Dr.longshot
  8. Mark425

    Mark425 TS Member

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    There is no correct answer. Kay Ohye shoots about 70% high or less, Leo Harrison doesn't shoot a real high gun but it seems to be slightly higher than Kays, Harlan Campbell shoots about 100% high and I think Ray Staffords gun shoots darn near straight up. That's what they say anyhow. All these shooters are as good as it gets, so you see...there is NO right answer. Me I like around 90% (12") at 40 yards. If you are a new shooter and not sure where to start I suggest 70% -80% (@ 7" at 40 yards or 4" at 20 yards).

    Mark

    p.s. I like to pattern at 20 yards.
  9. BigM-Perazzi

    BigM-Perazzi Well-Known Member

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    Just to start the argument. what IS 70% high, in inches....
  10. Nutso

    Nutso Member

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    90/10 for me.

    Question is POI on doubles, I tired lowering mine to 60/40' with dismal results, so now i've set back to 90/10, which is we're it will remain for the rest of the year. Gonna stick with it for a while.
  11. AveragEd

    AveragEd Active Member

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    I don't think what you see on a patterning board can be the whole answer. I like to use the patterning board to get a new gun shooting where an older one did on paper but the final adjustments have to made while shooting live targets.

    If I shoot my gun at a patterning board, the pellets closest to the aiming point will be 14" above it. THAT's a high POI! But it isn't "real" because if while shooting live targets, I snuggle up too close to a target or even block it with my bead, it will still break and fairly well at that. If my gun really did shoot as high as paper shows it to, those targets wouldn't even be dusted.

    I'm convinced there is something mechanically different that I do when shooting a moving gun at moving targets that I don't do when shooting a stationary gun at stationary targets. And I've taken clinics by three different clinicians, two of them multiple times, and nothing abnormal with my mechanics has ever been seen or caught on film.

    I used to have a shooting buddy who has since passed away whose story I've told many times. Tom would live at his club's patterning range and even had a printing shop make targets for that purpose. After spending hours getting his guns set where they "should be," he would proceed to shoot poorly at live targets. While shooting practice one day, I made him adjust his gun until his breaks were solid and his scores were good. The next day, he went back to the patterning range, didn't like what he saw and adjusted until he did. Of course, he shot poorly the next time and said in frustration, "It can't be my gun - I have it set right where it should be."

    Sometimes what you see isn't what you get. To me, patterning a shotgun is akin to bore-sighting a rifle scope. It can get you close but...

    Ed
  12. superxjeff

    superxjeff Active Member

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    The pattern board tells no lies.
  13. OldGoat

    OldGoat Active Member

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    AveragEd, Excellent comments and insight re: patterning vs. shooting at a moving target! Thanks and Best Regards, Ed
  14. steele

    steele TS Member

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    I like what Ed relates. From my view, the only thing a patterning board is good for, is to determine right/left patterns. This would be hard to determine on a moving target. After the pattern is verified to be centered horizontally,
    I think the adjustment for vertical lead should be checked by shooting straight away targets. The board can be checked for initial height, as a starting point.
    My better half was struggling for awhile, & one of the club pro's told her to pattern the gun ( Seitz w/ release). She/we did. It was shooting 100%. Her & the pro decided it was too high, & to set it up to for POI to equal POA plus 2". ( that equated to 60/40 ) That way she would shoot right where she is looking. All excited, she went out & missed 10-15 targets. She was really frustrated by now. We set up the trap for straightaway birds. We kept cranking the comb up & she was finally knocking the bottoms off. A few more spacers & she was vaporizing the birds. Not enough pieces to hit the ground.
    Went back to the patterning board & LOW & BEHOLD, the POI was the same as before the pro got his hands on it.
    The patterning board is usefull, but it will not solve all POI/POA issues.
    JMHO Butch from Pgh
  15. open choke

    open choke TS Member

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    Mark425,

    This is a 3 part question.

    1-When you say for a 90/10 pattern 12 inches high at 40 yards. Stupid question but 6 inches high at 20 is the same thing?

    2-Also when you determine how many inches high are you using the core of the pattern's hit?

    3-What are the other pattern percentages in inches? Like 70/30 is ___ inches high etc?

    I asked Mark cause he posted the most closest thing to what I was looking for; but please anyone who knows the answer please chime in as well
  16. Martinpicker

    Martinpicker Active Member

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  17. Mr. Flinch

    Mr. Flinch Member

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    Go to station 3 and have the thrower locked for straightaways and make gun adjustments until it smokes target at your comfort spot; the go to the pattern board just to see for future reference.

    Everyone moves their guns at a different speed and sees their own picture for hitting a target. IMHO.

    Mark
  18. open choke

    open choke TS Member

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    I do both methods. But IMO it takes out the guess work doing paper then straightaway birds.

    Think of it this way you can smoke birds with 50/50 pattern on straightaways. I also need to worry about every other presentation, handicap, and doubles too
  19. Mark425

    Mark425 TS Member

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    open choke,

    Measurement is at center of the core. Take the median (throw out the highest and lowest) of at least a half a dozen shots.

    Other posters are right about adjusting the pattern for smoke at a moving target. I don't like to shoot at more than around 10 targets at a time because I will start changing my shooting to smoke the target. I really use the pattern board to find a starting point and then document my setup. There are many other methods and ideas. This is just what I am used too and what works for me.


    [​IMG]
  20. late bloomer

    late bloomer TS Member

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    Neil Winston preaches that percentages are confusing, while inches above and below are more specific. His 13 yard point of impact seems to be fairly robust. Needless to say, that is just point of impact and not patterning.

    Terry Sandlin
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