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Pocket watches

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Doug Brown, Aug 30, 2011.

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  1. Doug Brown

    Doug Brown Well-Known Member

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    I have two Elgin pocket watches I want to sell- who can I trust?
     
  2. Mapper

    Mapper Member

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    Maybe a reputable jeweler. I have three of them, but have no idea what they bring now. There were lots of options with Elgins, so the price varies a lot.
     
  3. GBatch_25

    GBatch_25 Active Member

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    Be there is an Elgin Watch forum on the Internet.
    Try searching.

    Gene Batchelar
    Wheaton, IL
     
  4. trapshooterjoe7

    trapshooterjoe7 Member

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    Doug, i have a small collection, if you post or send me the model and sr# I can tell you what the book says they are worth. Joe
     
  5. elinvar

    elinvar Member

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    I also collect pocket watches - Illinois mostly- Elgin made over 50 million watches - Only the railroad grade ones are valuable. Most will fall in the 50-100 dollar range.
    Put up some pic's of the movements and the jewel count and I can give you a better idea of value.

    Terry Jones
     
  6. mixer

    mixer Well-Known Member

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    Speaking of pocket watches, I have this NRA limited edition pocket watch by Montana Silversmiths for sale. Never been used, a case queen. It will need a new battery. $175 with ground shipping. PM if interested.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  7. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    I inherited my grandfathers pocket watch that he used while working for the railroad in Milwaukee. It is a Hamilton.
    Steve Balistreri
     
  8. 1oz

    1oz Member

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    I also inherited my Grandfathers watch which is also a Hamilton he worked for the C & O railroad for 47 years they musta been good to him . Ive dated the watch back to 1903.
     
  9. Ithaca$$$Grade

    Ithaca$$$Grade Active Member

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    I've got some..............

    <a href="http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v662/jimw-mn/?action=view&current=HalloweenShootArieWatch004.jpg" target="_blank">[​IMG]</a>

    <a href="http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v662/jimw-mn/?action=view&current=HalloweenShootArieWatch003.jpg" target="_blank">[​IMG]</a>

    A guy named Mark Arie won it.
     
  10. over the hill

    over the hill Active Member

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    Elgin is largely shrugged off by watch collectors because of the amount of lower grade (7 jewel) watches that are found.

    However, their higher grades were very fine quality.

    Some of the earlier higher grades were not considered Railroad grade at the time.

    The Arie watch, from the picture, probably 12 size, and I would guess 17-19 Jewels would have a historical value far beyond it's worth to the average watch collector.



    Regards....Gerald
     
  11. Doug Brown

    Doug Brown Well-Known Member

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    These are 21 & 23 jewel.
     
  12. Big Heap

    Big Heap TS Member

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    "A guy named Mark Arie"

    Age: 75
    Year Inducted: 1970
    State: IL

    Mark Arie, one of the most colorful and popular trapshooters in the sport’s history, was considered to be one of the greatest handicap shots of all times. Born in 1883, Arie began his trapshooting career in 1905 when he entered his first tournament at Rantoul, Ill. and won top honors with 157x160. That year at the Grand, he hit 97 from 17 yards in the GAH, only two behind the winning 99.

    Arie became the first Grand Doubles Champion in 1912 when he won the title with 89. A span of 22 years later, in 1934, he won his second Doubles crown. He was the first shooter to run 100 straight doubles from scratch when he broke the first 163 in a 200-bird race at the Great Western Handicap at the Denver (CL.) Municipal TC on July 18, 1926.

    Arie tied for the GAH title in 1917 with 98, only to lose the shootoff. He returned in 1923 to become the first maximum-yardage shooter (23 yards) ever to win the GAH, posting 96. Besides tieing for the GAH in 1917, Arie annexed the Clay Target Championship. He won the singles title again in 1928 and was High-Over-All leader at the Grand in 1912, 1913, 1917, 1918, 1923, 1924 and 1932. In 1932 he tied for the Jim Day Cup, symbolic of the All-Around Championship.

    In 1919 he led the amateurs in singles with a .9780 mark on 2,920 targets, an amateur record at the time.

    It was in 1920 that Arie added international fame to his list of accomplishments by winning the individual gold medal in the Olympics. He smashed 95x100 at Antwerp, Belgium. He was also a member of the U.S. group that won the team gold medal in the 1920 Olympics.

    Arie decided to give it a try as an industry rep in 1921 but returned to the amateur ranks after one year. During the 1921 Grand, he tied for the professional championship.

    Arie attended the Grand seven times as the Illinois State singles titlist and three of those times he won the Champion of Champions race (1917, 1926 and 1934). He was a member of the winning Illinois team at the Grand in 1926, 1931 and 1935.

    At Iowa State in 1934. Arie was the second shooter to break 100 straight from 25 yards turning in his perfect score from the than maximum yardage. His all around total at that shoot was 395x400, an ATA record at the time.

    For the first four years of its existence, 1927 through 1930, Arie was named to the All American team. He also placed on the squad in 1932 and 1932.

    On November 19, 1958, Mark Arie died at his farm near Champaign, Illinois.
     
  13. Hal1225

    Hal1225 Member

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    Big Heap thank you very much for the info about Mark Arie. He is my all time favorite. His shotgun has no rib and no sights, if I am mistaken I apologize.
    Pictures of him shooting show a great style.

    Harry
     
  14. Dahaub

    Dahaub Active Member

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    Mark Arie was an exceptional shot and his gun of choice was a pump action Marlin.I was married to a daughter of his first cousin. Their family was large and one of the cousins told me a story about a family reunion where the guys were kidding Mark about his shooting ability and one of them challenged him to shoot a 22 rifle at hand thrown targets. The story went that he missed the first target and broke the next 49 and they ran out of 22 shells.

    There are also gaps in the years of his winning at the grand and in the state of Illinois championships. The story goes that he felt guilty about his having that natural talent and because of the "lack of competition" he didn't go back every year. I don't know if that is true just what I have read and been told about him by his cousins and their children. Dan
     
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