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Please help newbie with beads on trap gun

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Bushmaster1313, Feb 15, 2009.

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  1. Bushmaster1313

    Bushmaster1313 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2009
    Messages:
    1,605
    I know nothing about trap but I know I will love it

    For various reasons I am having an old (1940) but mechanically perfect 12 gauge, modified choke, 28-30 inch barreled Ithaca 37R full rib with a rotted stock reblued and fitted with a high comb stock and a starburst pad to be my first dedicated trap gun for me and my kids

    I know the ithaca is not ideal, but I want it refurbished to bring out its inner beauty and since I do not hunt I want to make it a trap gun so it WILL be used!

    Please advise about beads:
    Size color spacing and number.
    Current rib has one bead at the front. Gun is at Sycamore Hills right now, but I remember the bead being medium size and brass.

    Thank you all

    Here is the Ithaca:

    Lou
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Jollytrapshooter

    Jollytrapshooter Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2006
    Messages:
    881
    Really, I don't think it matters. You could put anything from a 3/32" bead to a bright green "Truglo" on the front and it wouldn't make much difference. The "standard" from what I've experienced, is a 1/16" mid bead and a .100" front bead. But a lot of people will tell you that the mid bead is simply a gimic to make people think a gun fits when it really doesn't. But it's basically whatever "suits your fancy". Hope this helps, Josh.
     
  3. miketmx

    miketmx Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,963
    Lots of Trap and Skeet guns have a middle bead so you can check gun alignment before you call for the target. The problem is: this gets to be a bad habit called "bead checking" and you forget that the most important thing is to look for the target. The need of the center bead is way over-rated. I have deliberately filed down my center bead so it is an inconspicuous tiny thing. Any color including brass is OK for the front bead.
     
  4. Bruce Specht

    Bruce Specht Well-Known Member

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    5,049
    Location:
    Near but not in chicago
    First time I looked for the alignment of both beads I started missing targets.
     
  5. sgb.1100

    sgb.1100 TS Member

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    Jul 4, 2008
    Messages:
    42
    the middle bead is to check alignment of the gun in set up for the shot and is then ignored for taking the shot. If you continuing checking mid bead and end bead alignment during a shot, it's reasonable that you would miss.
     
  6. KENENT1

    KENENT1 Active Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Beloit, WI
    just use the front bead, you can center it up with the rib, chances are you'll have to raise the comb up so high to get it to shoot where you want, there will ending up with a lot of space between the two beads.



    tony
     
  7. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

    Joined:
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    3,715
    I believe that what works best is a bead that your eye can see, so that your sub-conscious mind has some reference (through your eyes) to where your muzzle is, but not so eye catching that it draws your primary focus to it. For me that is small and red, because green grabs my eye. Red lets me look past it to the target and keep my focus "out there" but is still "seen" in my forward vision.
     
  8. welderman

    welderman TS Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2006
    Messages:
    102
    My advice on beads is this. If all you are ever going to shoot is trap with a high gun mount, then 2 beads and a bead check is fine, as long as your vision is focused down range when you call for the bird. NEVER double check your bead allignment after calling for the bird. On the other hand, if you ever plan to hunt, shoot sporting clays, or anything involving a low gun approach, you will find that a bead check consumes too much time, and involves some fast focus changes. In that case, you are better off concentrating on using the gun the way it was intended to be used. Proper fit, and your eye as the rear sight - no bead check. This is a decision I suggest you make before investing a lot of learning and practice time because once you form a habit, it will be difficult to change. Tom S (welderman)
     
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