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Plastic removal in bbl question

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by 635 G, Jul 31, 2008.

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  1. 635 G

    635 G Well-Known Member

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    I do almost the same thing, first I soak a chamber brush in old Hoppes # 9, rotate it by hand, then I go to a 10 ga brush in a slow speed drill, squirt some blaster in the barrel, push a few patches thru until they are pretty clean & the final job is done by a bore snake. It has become a lot easier since I started using Downrange wads.

    Lou
     
  2. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    Brownell's makes a "Double Tuff' Bore brush, made for cleaning barrels fired with Buckshot loads. The bristles are very thick and work well at this. Get them by the dozen. They also make them for pistol and rifle bores.

    I have used them for years. They will cut you if you handle them roughly!
     
  3. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    Shooter's Choice Shotgun Bore & Choke Cleaner is the most effective solution I've found. I spray some in the chamber end, then tilt the barrel down to let the stuff flow to the muzzle. I rotate the barrel to evenly distribute the product. I then spray some into the choke end. Let it sit for 3-5 minutes, then scrub with brushes. I use a choke brush (Briley) a chamber brush and a bore brush. Everything comes out spotless.

    You may have to repeat several times to get all the gunk out the first time. Then there should be no problem thereafter. I clean my barrels after each 1000-2000 shots and they are clean after one application and scrub.

    BTW, it does have an odor, and it does annoy my better half.
     
  4. dzeh

    dzeh Member

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    I found that those gray (stainless steel I think) spiral type bore brushes work great at scraping the plastic out. I'm not talking about the brass bristle type brush but the one that looks like a wire helix. Works especially well when cleaning the plastic residue out of my chokes. Less than 5 bucks. I gave one to a friend and he loves it.
     
  5. FN in MT

    FN in MT TS Member

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    +1 on the Brownells WAD SOLVENT. FAR less junk to carry around vs the brush in a drill method. I do use them with the special double tuff Brownells brushes though.

    FN in MT
     
  6. spritc

    spritc Active Member

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    I use a 10 gauge bore snake with hoppe's No. 9 after each day shooting. I never have any build-up. Pull it through twice and I'm done with the bores until next time.

    Steve
     
  7. quartering

    quartering Active Member

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    acetone does a real good job of making the plastic loosen from the bore. wd40 does a good job too. stay away from claybuster wads, they're sticky, and stainless steel bore brushes, they're abrasive at speed. if you're going to spin a brush on the end of a drill, make sure that it's either nylon or bronze. i absolutely refuse to clean a gun until it is absolutely necessary. my advice is sound
     
  8. handlepuller

    handlepuller Well-Known Member

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    Get it nice and clean MIA then switch wads.

    I'd be willing to bet you're using Claybusters. Switch to Dusters.

    I seriously used to use a broken stick with a sharp edge on it to scrape out the Claybuster plastic.
     
  9. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    To remove plastic, it is best to use a solvent that will partially dissolve and soften the plastic. This means a non polar solvent. Acetone is great but it evaporates quickly. Carbon tetrachloride is excellent but hard to get. Xylene works well but has a strong oder. Mineral spirits is not too bad. The commercial wad remover solutions use these types of solvent mixed with a light oil. You can make your own solution with paint thinner, acetone and kerosene. A thick build up may take a lot of scrubbing.

    A mixture or transmission fluid, acetone and kerosene is good for cleaning all gun parts.

    I have used a lot of Claybuster wads and have not found them to leave any more plastic in the barrels than any other brand of wad.

    Pat Ireland
     
  10. DB3006

    DB3006 Member

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    Why not just clean your gun more often?

    Just a thought! DB
     
  11. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    sarge- Yes, carbon tetrachloride is slowly absorbed through the skin, just as is xylene, acetone and paint thinner. It is no longer sold in discount stores for ladies to use to strip wax from kitchen floors and I think its use has been reduced in dry cleaning services. But it was common for nearly 50 years and was widely used by housewives.

    I did not mention some of the more dangerous plastic solvents that I have and have used (Trichloroethane, Petroleum Ether). The potential danger of these solvents make Carbon Tet look like Kool Aid.

    Pat Ireland
     
  12. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    The best solvent for plastic is acetone. Put some in a small glass jar and stand barrel in jar over night. The plastic will be gone in the morning. Use a brass brush and a couple patches to complete the job. HMB
     
  13. lytnin1

    lytnin1 Member

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    G96 made a 'Spray Solvent'in their traditonal yellow/black can that had written on it ' specially made to remove wad fouling ' stunk a bit . It was bloody good , next best was good ole WD40
     
  14. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    I'll spray enough WD-40 into the bore to sort of make a strip/bubble then turn the barrel slowly so that the entire bore is wet. After it's left for a few minutes, it's an o'size brush on a rod back and forth and turning and patches to remove the debris left. OR I use the wonderful invention of Carson City, NV shooter, Dave Shadel (DS-AA here occasionally) with his fabulous rods with removable parts so it can be used by hand or in a battery drill and using a patch of very fine ScotchBrite-like material that leaves barrels looking like mirrors. His web page, above, doesn't mention the cleaning rods but I last heard he's still making them on request and can be any length and configuration you want.....breakemall....Bob Dodd
     
  15. handlepuller

    handlepuller Well-Known Member

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    I'm surprised that many of you are getting that much plastic buildup.

    Just seems like a lot to me and some extreme measures to get the barrels clean.
     
  16. Tripod

    Tripod Well-Known Member

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    What is odd to me is that I use 11/8 ounce orange claybusters and I never get any buildup in my fixed full choke remington 1100 barre, but it builds up in my browning 424 with my more open chokes. Any ideas why?
     
  17. deercreek

    deercreek Well-Known Member

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    Had the same problem in all my shotguns but much worse in my wife's Beretta 390 and 391. Guess what... I was using only Claybuster wads. Most of my plastic fouling stopped when I switched to green and blue Duster's. I think you will always have a little plastic build up. MY quick method is 1)dry patch to knock out the loose stuff 2)Outers Nitro Solvent - spray can 3)scrub bbl with 12ga bronze brush 4)dry patch 5)Light nitro spray again and one patch---put gun away. Can clean my trap gun and wipe down outside, putting away in about four minutes total. Bryan
     
  18. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    I shoot about 50K rounds annually, and use Claybusters. I don't have a problem with plastic fouling, but I clean bores after every outing.

    I get about the same amount of fouling, and use the same cleaning technique regardless of the type of wad I use.

    If a friend sells off his loading stuff, or if a fellow buys the wrong wad and wants to trade, I use whatever I can get for the right price.

    Are some of us not cleaning a gun when we should?

    I have shot 2500 rounds in a weekend, and don't have the kind of buildup you guys are talking about. What gives?
     
  19. nipper

    nipper TS Member

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    i see a treble hook myself

    bill
     
  20. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    Dear Nipper

    I am starting to wonder, myself.

    Several years ago, I traded into a case of Federal 12SO's. They left more fouling in my guns than any other brand I have EVER used.

    Claybuster, Downrange, Duster, factory loads (the very few I shoot) all seem to leave about the same amount of fouling in several different guns in four gauges.

    If Claybuster were that bad, they would be out of business.
     
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