1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

physics question please

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by tinman18, Nov 27, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. tinman18

    tinman18 TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    22
    a bullet is fired from a level stand with the rifle level with the stand and the stand 20 feet off the ground. If the same weight bullet is dropped from the stand will they both hit the ground at the same time?
    Thanks
     
  2. Mike Michalski

    Mike Michalski Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    637
    Location:
    Troy Michigan
    Only if the gun is fired at the same time the bullet is dropped, and the ground is level.
     
  3. cdconley

    cdconley TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    643
    Yes, assuming that the ground is level during the entire flight. Bottom line is that the bullet dropped will fall at the exact rate as the bullet fired from the gun.
     
  4. GoldEx

    GoldEx Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,228
    Location:
    Howell, MI
    Physics 101. Yes they will. Gravity affects each projectile the same regardless if the bullets weigh the same amount or not. Gallileo (spelling) proved that by dropping cannonballs hundreds of years ago.

    Jeff
     
  5. Easystreet

    Easystreet Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,463
    The answer is "yes", but somehow I think this was a LOADED question. (wink)
     
  6. ccw1911

    ccw1911 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    816
    No. The bullet must be dropped at the exact time the bullet leaves the barrel not when the gun is fired.
     
  7. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,420
    Only if the Earth is flat. HMB
     
  8. Jeff P

    Jeff P Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,689
    Not much need to muddy the waters here....

    X and Y motion are independant of each other. So the velocity of the bullet (the Y motion) is unrelated to the X motion (the drop of the bullet caused by gravity, whether fired or not). A bullet that leaves the barrel over level ground will hit that ground at the same time as a bullet dropped from the muzzle at the same time the fired bullet departs.

    One of my physics teachers had a really cool little gadget that could be mounted in a vice and would shoot a ball bearing about 8 feet out one side while it tipped the same size bearing out the other. You could stand back and watch them hit the ground at the same time - and hear them hit too - on a tile classroom floor
     
  9. primed

    primed Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,119
    Let's see, if Eli Manning throws a forward pass that is level, will it hit the ground the same time it would if he fumbled? Or will Darrin Sharper be a different frictional force? Just curious.

    Bob
     
  10. ChetH

    ChetH Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    110
    Gravity is an amazing thing. Follow the above link to see what happens when the air's resistance is not an issue.

    chet
     
  11. cdconley

    cdconley TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    643
    ccw1911,

    Very good, the bullet will not start falling until it leaves the barrel. Shallow thinkers (like me) would have assumed the bullet started to fall when fired. So the answer would be NO based on the way the question was worded.

    Although I should get partial credit because in my essay answer I finished with “Bottom line is that the bullet dropped will fall at the exact rate as the bullet fired from the gun.” Irregardless of when either bullet started to fall both would fall at the same rate.
     
  12. djpk69

    djpk69 TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    725
    WOW, PHYSICS 101. so, if one shoots a 22LR bullet staight up in the air....and drops one at the same time ..they land at the same time???
     
  13. Beancounter

    Beancounter TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    482
    dkusner - you missed the part about a level mount and shooting over level ground. Stop being silly.
     
  14. I WON

    I WON TS Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2007
    Messages:
    197
    32'/second.
     
  15. phirel

    phirel TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,556
    admiral Art- the term "Irregardless" means that the person who uses it likes to use "words" that are not words.

    Pat Ireland
     
  16. SoftCraft

    SoftCraft TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    37
    Alls well except there are also aero-dynamics involved. For them both to drop at the same time, the test has to be done in a vacuum.

    Rich
     
  17. m70win

    m70win Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    288
    Location:
    Tipsico Lake Mi
    So in a vacuam would it be better to shoot 7&1/2s, 8s or 9s? If you were on the moon shooting trap how would you have to set the traps? Boy I think were all getting cabin fever all ready.
    Tim
     
  18. TOOT

    TOOT TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    114
    Ah but....the Dyson only uses 7 1/2's and the Hoover 8's. Is this a bagless vaccum?
     
  19. kolar12

    kolar12 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    622
    Location:
    AZ
    32'/sec/sec.
     
  20. avidtrapshooter

    avidtrapshooter TS Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2007
    Messages:
    228
    This might be a dumb, but I am going to go ahead and post. Doesn't a bullet have an arch to it? When fired doesn't it climb a bit before it falls? I remember sighting in my shotgun at 25 yards with slugs and it was a bit high at 50; same with the .22. So wouldn't the trajectory of the bullet make a difference?
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.