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Pheasant hunters ??

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by bodybuilder, Dec 10, 2011.

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  1. bodybuilder

    bodybuilder TS Member

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    I have never hunted pheasants but I am a trapshooter and waterfowl hunter. 6 men from our region that are not trapshooters went to SD on a paid pheasant hunt. One of them told me today they spread out and walked thru a field with dogs. He said in 3 days he shot 60 times with his semi auto 12ga and killed 4 birds and the rest of the guys did'nt fair much better. I ask him if he was using a slingshot? Are they that hard to hit or are these guys that bad? I would think a full choke of copper 5's would handle most shots. Correct me if I'm wrong because like I said I have never shot at them
     
  2. minnship8

    minnship8 Well-Known Member

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    Late in the season, when the birds are getting up wild, I'll often move to 3" 1 7'8's copper plated 4,4,2 for my three shots. Much less than that and you might as well spit ball 'em.
     
  3. Stl Flyn

    Stl Flyn Well-Known Member

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    Any live target is hard to hit, because of the element of surprise and the unknown movement, distance,etc..
     
  4. copper

    copper Member

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    Corn fields are tough birds run and run I have hunted pheasant a lot and use trap loads 7 1/2 but have a close working dog . Pheasants even store bought learn early on if they here yelling or bells to put in high gear. You usually rush your shot
     
  5. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Usually on a paid hunt the guide puts the birds out in the field in the morning. Birds that have lived most of their adult life in a box or a cage. When the dog scares them up they fly a little and then they are on the verge of cardiac arrest. Are they hard to hit? What do you think? HMB
     
  6. bubba68

    bubba68 Member

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    Need a lot more information. When you say "paid pheasant hunt", do you mean a preserve with planted birds - or - do you mean they paid for access to land to hunt wild birds? Big difference.

    With preserve birds, I would expect better results. They usually hold fairly well and shots are close.

    With wild birds - even if you pay to access the land - can be extremely tough or very easy. It all depends on weather, early vs. late season, etc. But, no matter what, a wild pheasant is NEVER a gimmee! Don't judge you buddies' success (or lack of it) unless you were there shooting by their side!

    FWIW, I go with a small group of friends to SD each year. This year was particularly tough. They had a tough winter and a wet spring. Result is fewer younger birds this year. That means tougher shots at older, wiser birds! Just keep that in mind.
     
  7. Gary Waalkes

    Gary Waalkes Well-Known Member

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    Pheasants are not hard to kill but there are some things to consider when hunting them while walking in large areas. Those long barreled and somewhat heavy waterfowl guns do not handle well in upland conditions you described. You need a gun that comes up fast and fits even if you are wearing heavy clothes. You have to recognize the bird, get the gun up, safety off, swing and shoot. This task becomes more difficult with cold fingers, tired arms, tired legs, and out of condition bodies. Old fat men who are breathing heavily will not do as well as a 12 year old kid.
     
  8. Maurice

    Maurice Member

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    I can't believe anyone would use 3" 1 7/8oz #4 for pheasant. I have hunted pheasant in North America for over 45 years with great success using no more than regular 2 3/4" 1 1/4oz #4 chilled shot standard game loads, modified choke bottom barrel and improved modified top barrel hunting over German Short Haired Pointers. Maurice ( The Brit. )
     
  9. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    They were obviously "pushing" fields, not hunting over pointers. When you gang hunt, birds tend to run ahead a flush at longer distances causing longer shots.

    1 1/4 oz of #6,5, or 4's is all you need. If you can't kill'm with that, you're shooting beyond your range, or simply missing.

    Also sounds like these guys haven't shot much, so what did they expect?
     
  10. neckdeep

    neckdeep Member

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    lots of good points brought up in the previous posts, i am by no means a sd pheasant expert, i have been to Presho the last two years the week before christmas and headed to Miller, SD next weekend for a three day trip

    i have seen a lot of them hit the ground in the last 28 years since i was 12 years old, some seem to be very tough but overall the SD birds arent that hard or tough to bring down

    i took a 28 last year and shot less than ten shells for my limit the first two days( four shells at long range passing birds bringing down one of them) shot my 16 the last day and it felt like a canon

    this year could be a different story, a lot less birds meaning fewer opportunities, i am taking a 12 and 16, might bring a 28/410 combo just because i haven't killed a rooster with it yet

    if you are close enough and point your gun in the right spot they will hit the ground

    your friends have a serious case of chs (can't hit s**t)

    head on out and see it for yourself, when you get into the right food plot and 1500 birds come out its worth the drive and cost

    cant wait till next weekend

    Gale Johnson
     
  11. twotimer

    twotimer Member

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    We've been going to Aberdeen for a few years now. Heard it was slow this year. We hunt on a private farm-mostly corn and beans. The farmer had most the crops off, but left strips for us to hunt. There may been a shortage of birds but we didn't notice. Got 15 limits 3 days in a row in a few hours a day. Mike
     
  12. minnship8

    minnship8 Well-Known Member

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    Maurice,
    Sounds like you put the gun and the dog up before the leaves come off the trees. Where I hunt pheasants, IA, NE, KS, SD, ND, by the time the snow hits the ground, the wild birds avg distance at flush is 40+ yards, and yes, that is over pointing dogs. Some days, you step into the field at one end, and the birds are getting out on the other. If you tried to use those loads you described on the hunts I've been on in late season, you'd never get a bird.

    Never chastise someone for doing something you have no experience with.
     
  13. shannon391

    shannon391 Active Member

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    What a rotten bunch of shots! That's a lot of missing.

    Don't underestimate the Brit, he's shot everything that's walked or crawled.

    (Sniper, Kings Army).
     
  14. handlepuller

    handlepuller Well-Known Member

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    When hunting with other guys, there is a tendency to rush shots to try to kill it first. I think this is the most common reason people miss pheasants.

    Also these birds rise fast. I know I tend not to give enough vertical lead and frequently miss close flushes that are really rising fast.

    That seems like a lot of shells for that many birds but yes, they can be hard to hit. I'm kind of embarassed by how many shells I use this year in SD, but had a heck of a good time.
     
  15. 3357

    3357 Member

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    I volunteer to be a blocker for these guys next year.
     
  16. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    Just got back from SD yesterday. 7 hunters, 2 pointers. All shot 1 1/4 0z #5's and we limited out all 5 days. We blocked most of the fields, but the dogs had many points as well. All wild birds.

    Sometimes we had birds flush well ahead of the walkers, and long shots resulted, but our group consisted of experienced shooters. Everyone shot IMOD or tighter.

    Birds were down about 50% from last year.
     
  17. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    4 birds in the bag and 60 rounds fired should tell you whats going on. Those long going away shots are not good shots because you are shooting at the back, the butt and wing edges. Good chance of wounding the bird but not bringing it down.

    I doubt they were canned birds as the guide wouldn't need to do a field sweep to get those.

    I have got crosswise with a few celebrity posters here on this particular subject so I will just say the gang drive isn't my thing unless you count one man and two dogs as a gang.

    Yes an ounce and a quarter of #5 lead is an excellent load for pheasants and all that is required.
     
  18. bodybuilder

    bodybuilder TS Member

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    he said they were wild birds
     
  19. Texshooter

    Texshooter Member

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    Aim for the head, not the tail. AJ
     
  20. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    I prefer hunting ringnecks as Wolfram does! I get much more enjoyment watching the dogs figuring out an old roosters tactics as I do getting a limit. To me that's hunting and not just walking and shooting or blocking and shooting.

    Hap
     
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