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Pheasant Farms or Midwest?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by k newman, Apr 3, 2009.

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  1. k newman

    k newman TS Member

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    I live in PA where pheasant hunting is a joke, and grouse is a travel and questionable sightings proposition.

    outside of the season stockings, I currently take trips to local game farms - put out 8-10 birds for a few hour hunt -- relatively cheap and keeps the dog tuned.

    How much better am I to take trips to a farm within an hour, or to book a SD trip, or some other state with birds. I'm thinking a week in SD, plus a drive of 20 hours, I'm better off just to hunt locally 2-3 times a month.

    I'd love to go out to SD, but if I can hunt a $100 a day here, what are the benefits.
     
  2. birdognorth

    birdognorth TS Member

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    If you go to SD and hunt private land where you are charged to hunt, you are likely hunting pen raised birds. You are money ahead and will shoot more birds staying home. Your dog will flush and retrieve more birds thru the season near home.
     
  3. K80433SC

    K80433SC Member

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    I have also seen the demise of local pheasant hunting, and it has lead me to make yearly ventures to Kansas. Trust me -- it is WELL worth your time and money !!

    Contrary to a previous post, we hunt all WILD birds, and they are indeed a challenge - both to try to outwit and "corral" - and to your shooting skills. These birds always seem to know exactly when to flush, so as to catch you off-guard and looking in the other direction. And when they do get airborne, they fly like feathered rockets !! Be prepared.........we shoot alot of copper-plated no. 5s, in a maximum-dram pheasant load, such as the golden pheasant shells or the super xx.

    An excellent hatching season and moderate summer temperatures have resulted in tremendous numbers of birds, with us having seen as high as 52 roosters in ONE field on a scouting mission prior to hunting.

    Kansas has ample acreage in the government's CRP program, affording the wild pheasant population plenty of excellent cover. A call to their Fish & Game Department or a visit to the website will point you in the direction of their WIHA (walk-in hunting areas), where you can enjoy a "do-it-yourself" hunting adventure.

    Should you decide on a hunt with amenities and guided transportation, I might recommend Tyler Remington (cool name) at Remranchoutfitters.com. He and his wife Kassie run an excellent family-based, hunter friendly operation out of Gove, KS - in the heart of some of the best pheasant hunting areas you will ever experience. I have hunted with Tyler in previous years, and have come to know the family as catering to the hunter's best interest. Visit their website, and give them a call.

    Should you decide to book with them, please tell them that Stu from PA referenced their operation. Hope this gives you some help.
     
  4. deercreek

    deercreek Well-Known Member

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    Stu,

    The Remranchoutfirrers.com did not work ???
     
  5. bigdogtx

    bigdogtx Well-Known Member

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    k, if you want to go to SD by yourself then it won't be much fun. I have hunted the midwest all my life,,,,bird numbers up and down,,,,no matter the population,,,,always much more fun with a dog and companion,,,,makes the ride shorter,,,,especially coming home....
     
  6. cubancigar2000

    cubancigar2000 Well-Known Member

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    no farm raised birds in SD. They are wild.There are so many phesants the farmers dont need to raise them? Best hunting you will ever experience but it is getting very expensive. Kansas is getting just as good again also.
     
  7. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    You have to be careful who book with in SD. Most big outfitters release birds. Even some of the smaller guys release chicks in the spring to suppliment their bird numbers. Where we hunt in SD most of the farmers mow their ditches to stop road hunting, so it forces out of state hunters to pay to hunt. $100 -$125/day is normal. It is getting harder every year to get permission to hunt. Bird numbers are way up in some spots in SD, but you have to find the pockets. It will take a few years of searching if you don't know anyone. A lot of the good spots are leased. We train on pen raised birds, but still make a trek to SD every year. Wouldn't miss it.
     
  8. whiz white

    whiz white Strong Supporter of Trapshooting Banned

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    $100 a day pheasants hunts are a helluva bargain.

    Try more like $200 on the private areas, NOT pheasant farms.

    We used to charge $150 a day and that was 10 years ago, but no longer let others hunt except your friends, and a few business associates.

    Land that sold for around $300 in the late 90's is now going for $1,200 and more an acre. That's the big corporate money that wants pheasant hunting ground, and has sure driven up the costs for farmers.

    We have about 10,000 planted acres, a big operation, and used to host Browning, but no longer host anyone.

    If you can get a $100 a day hunt, I'd jump on it in a heartbeat!

    Whiz<BR>
    Rapid City SD
     
  9. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    Whiz, I realize it's a deal, but we still get guys complaining about the cost. Simple, don't go along next year! We do both, pen raised, and a 1 week hunt in SD. It's vacation for me, and having grown on a farm, I have no problem giving our farmers some cash. Most could use it.
     
  10. whiz white

    whiz white Strong Supporter of Trapshooting Banned

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    You are so right about getting the farmers cash. With the costs of everything they use; fuel, seed, fertilizer, combines, tractors prices going out the roof, some of them are on the verge of going under.

    Luckily our operation is a big one with bit customers, but the poor small farmer is more and more so a thing of the past. And, that is extremely saddening, because the small farm is/was the backbone of American.

    I used to hunt with a group from Dallas, World Service Life Ins., and the Dallas First National Bank. They'd fly in a couple of big planes, reserve an entire floor of a hotel, hire a catered bartender and area to party.

    It was a big time for them and they even rent cars and trucks for us to use. Price was not a problem for them. Unfortunately, when a farmer get a new truck to use annually, that kind of gratuity eventually gets accustomed to and then expected.

    It has come to be paid hunting, and I am sorry for that. Too bad we all couldn't just come and hunt anywhere. The Open Public Areas get hit so hard, that I pity the out-of-staters trying to find good places. Most small farmers will let folks hunt their ground if they'd stop in early and ask.

    Also, I support public hunting of road right-of-ways. Another area to hunt that is often overlooked are railroad ROW's. Because in this state many of these were either (trying to think of the two legal words here - a County Commission I was on that discussed at length with the States' Attorney's office this) purchased or condemned easements, it is next to impossible to prove who actually owns them according to the SAO. If they were easements, then they could revert back to the land owner when abandoned, I believe, and if they were condemnations, then they don't. In either case I think a hunter could hunt them without a problem. You may have to argue with a landowner occasionally.

    My fantasy would be to get hold of one of those old 4-wheel 5HP small putt-putts, and put your shells, dogs, refreshments, umbrella on one and head on down the line. You would limit quickly... and be on the lookout for a train!

    Whiz
     
  11. TN Larry

    TN Larry TS Member

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    cubancigar2000 you have made a statement that is blatantly false!!!!!!! I own @ 1000 acres in NE and have hunted South Dakota for years. My brother and I were in a truck stop in Chamberlin, SD several years ago and a truck pulled in piled high with pheasants in crates. We struck up a conversation with the driver and he told us that the whole load was staying in the state of SD. It is physically impossible to raise wild the #'s of pheasants that are shot at many of the pay to shoot places. I'm not saying that there are not places where you would be hunting "wild" birds, but then what are wild birds. Some farmers raise birds and turn them loose early in the year---they are "wild" by the time the season starts. You simply can't say there are NO farm raised birds in SD!!!!!!!!
     
  12. whiz white

    whiz white Strong Supporter of Trapshooting Banned

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    When I worked for Governor Dick Kneip (now deceased), he had me up at his place in Salem, SD. He owned thte John Deere dealership there and farm.

    We were all fed a big lunch, and while eating I looked out the window to see several men shooing birds out of a absolutely HUGE pen. The birds didn't care about anything going on, and stood around looking at each other.

    When we went out to shoot, the birds were on the telephone poles, in the trees, running around the grounds, on the hay stacks, etc. - looked like a bunch of ants.

    It was the dumbest "hunt" I'd been on. No skill whatsoever involved in shooting them. Some still even had on their blinders or the pins through their beaks. It was not a hunt, but a shoot.

    Many farmers buy birds and let them out in the wild. We don't, because we leave cover year round for them, and on much of the properties we have the typical shelter belts.

    I am sure that there are pen raised birds around. Check out http://www.paulnelsonfarm.com/. This is where the VP hunts and other high dollar vip's. Also, my hunting partner, a retired GM Dealer and good friend, owns land adjacent to it. He, Vic, tells me that Paul must buys birds because it is a season long affair.

    Vic hunts with me as a friend the first and second weekend. More so because of the camaraderie than the birds, but we always limit - and sometimes too quickly.

    Whiz
     
  13. K80433SC

    K80433SC Member

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    deercreek : I was not able to get online last evening, so I did not see your message until this morning. You are correct. For whatever reason, the website to Remranchoutfitters is not working.
    Should you have interest, here is some more info.....Tyler & Kassie Remington, 118 W. 4th Street, P.O. Box 93, Gove, KS 67736 Phone : 785-938-2277
    As I stated earlier, they run a nice operation - plenty of wild birds, coupled with an excellent knowledge of the surrounding landowners, etc.
    Give Tyler a call.........
     
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