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Perazzi Top Lever Stop Plate Fell Off

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by brucestorey, May 30, 2010.

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  1. brucestorey

    brucestorey Member

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    Yesterday, when I was shooting, after I fired a pair, my Perazzi MX3 Special (the same workings as an MX8) would not open. I took the forend off -- still wouldn't open. Took the trigger group out -- wouldn't open. However, when I looked inside of the receiver where the trigger group resides, I found the top lever stop plate release spring plunger laying in there -- I'm lucky it didn't fall out. After rattling the gun a bit, I was able to open it, and I could see the stop lever release plate flopping around between the wood and the receiver. I could also see the end of the top lever lock pin return spring just dangling a little from its hole.

    I had to go home becuase I wanted a "sterile" work environment with good light and the right tools to attempt to fix this problem.

    What I found is, the lock pin for the top lever and firing pins had drifted just far enough to the left to allow the top lever stop plate to slip off the right end of it, causing it to drop down and allowing the top lever lock pin return spring to shoot the top lever stop plate release spring plunger into the trigger group and allowng the top lever stop plate release pin to drop down out of its hole. What a mess -- talk about a snowball effect!

    Luckily, I hadn't lost or damaged any of the parts and I was able to put it all back together without too much problem.

    My question is: What is supposed to keep the lock pin for the top lever and firing pins from drifting left and right? How can I prevent this from happening again? It looks to me like the wood of the stock is the only thing that keeps this pin from drifting, and if this is the case, what should I do to keep it from happening again? If the pin drifts to the left just less than 3/16 of an inch, I will be in the same predicament again.

    Thank you,

    Bruce
     
  2. brucestorey

    brucestorey Member

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    Man, I was hoping this was going to be something that was common and had a quick fix, but it looks like I either didn't explain it clearly or I am in deep doodoo.

    Bruce
     
  3. PerazziBigBore

    PerazziBigBore TS Member

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    Bruce.. The inletting in your stock should be close enough to prevent this from happening.. Exactly the same thing happened to me years ago.. Giacomo had me epoxy a piece of wood in the neck of the stock..so all the extra space was removed.. 15 years later.. still no problem..
     
  4. PerazziBigBore

    PerazziBigBore TS Member

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    Bruce.. you could also get a slightly oversized lock pin.. OR..knurl the end of it so it bites in the receiver..
     
  5. Ed Y

    Ed Y TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Bruce,

    We had the same problem with a gun that my son-in-law shot. The problem can be solved by either "staking" the pin or replacing it with a longer one that can't move sideways, which is how we solved that problem. I used a piece of drill rod and it worked perfectly. At the time I had to buy a 3' piece of it so if you need a piece, I'd be happy to send it to you foc. You'll have to shorten the piece that I send you so that it just fits between the wood cheeks of the stock. It will stick out from the metal on both sides but it won't allow the plate to fall out again. If you want a piece, PM me your address and I'll get it out to you on tuesday.

    Ed Yanchok
     
  6. brucestorey

    brucestorey Member

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    "Bruce.. you could also get a slightly oversized lock pin.. OR..knurl the end of it so it bites in the receiver.. "

    When you say oversized, do you mean in length, or in diameter? I was also thinking of going the knurl route, but I thought I might just have to "gnarl" one end, just a little, and tap it in.

    I think your idea of adding wood to close the apparent gap between the inletting and the pin is a good one, and would be the safest way to go for me.

    Either way, I think you have eased my mind for my most important concern of whether that pin is supposed to be able to drift. It looks like it is supposed to be able to drift either way, but needs a tight-fitting stock to hold it where it belongs. I was concerned that the pin had worn down and wasn't fitting as tightly as it should, but that doesn't seem to be the case.

    Thank you very much,

    Bruce
     
  7. Don Rackley

    Don Rackley Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    Bruce,

    PBB suggested a really good fix. Take 2 small pieces of scrap wood about 1/8" thick and epoxy to each side of the inletted area of the stock. If the pin is flush with both sides of the receiver it is the correct length. The stock needs to do its part. If you make a longer pin and ever change stocks, the new stock might not fit.

    Don
     
  8. brucestorey

    brucestorey Member

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    Ed,

    Thank you. I was typing my last post while you posted yours. Your idea sounds like a good one, too.

    I will first try adding some wood and if that doesn't work, I will take you up on your generous offer.

    Bruce
     
  9. brucestorey

    brucestorey Member

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    Don,

    I think you have a good point.

    Thank you, all, for the great answers.

    Bruce
     
  10. PerazziBigBore

    PerazziBigBore TS Member

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    If you have access to a box of lock pins for a Perazzi.. a few here and there are just a wee bit larger.. and might fit tighter.. In some of the older guns..where the pin has been in and out.. countless time.. and on softer frames.. the pin can sometimes be a wee bit loose.. If the stock fits correctly.. neither is an issue.. The pin is pretty hard.so a lathe with a good knurler on just the last 1/8" would do the trick.. but so would a popsickle stick and some wood glue..(what I used).. and forever fixed the problem.. In any event.. a easily fixed problem..
     
  11. brucestorey

    brucestorey Member

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    Well, I took a look at adding some wood, but the inletting at the point where I would have to add wood is too small and wouldn't give me enough surface area to work with. I decided to just build-up that small area with a bead of Epoxy, which seems to have done the trick. I guess I will find out how good I am later this week, when I shoot a tournament in PA. I will definitely have my backup MX3 Special with me, at the ready for a mid-flight swap-out.

    Bruce
     
  12. Barry C. Roach

    Barry C. Roach Well-Known Member

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    Good information to know. Never had or seen the problem but good to know.
     
  13. Steve W

    Steve W Well-Known Member

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    I help a friend with this problem once, I use pin point amount of 3M glue at the left and right end of the pin, the frictions is just enough to stop it from moving. It worked fine, and the pin is still removable.
     
  14. Steve W

    Steve W Well-Known Member

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    I think the 3M glue I used at the time was for leather and plastic. It's flexible and not hard after it dried. Oil proof.
     
  15. BigM-Perazzi

    BigM-Perazzi Well-Known Member

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    Probably something that should be checked during the annual check-up....
     
  16. whiz white

    whiz white Strong Supporter of Trapshooting Banned

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    If it is a standard pin, I doubt you can knurl it much, as it is super hard.

    Smack the end of the present pin enough to make it a bit out-of-round, and then drive the pin in from the other end.

    Were you able to salvage the pin, plunger and long coil? If not, I have all these items.

    Good luck.

    WW
     
  17. OldGoat

    OldGoat Well-Known Member

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    All this discussion REALLY makes me nervous about the need to "upgrade" from a Browning XT to a Perazzi...Never heard of a Browning falling apart like this; apparently it is not an unusual problem...and I'm not into buying 2 Perazzis so I can use one for a "back-up". Comments? Regards, Ed
     
  18. Steve W

    Steve W Well-Known Member

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    In the past 20 years of shooting Perazzis, only saw one happened, and it didn't fall out, my friend caught it after changing stocks, it only happened when you are playing with different stocks from other guns.

    Original factory stock came with the gun will not see this. Many gun parts especially pins are kept in place with stocks. Same thing with trigger group, if you don't keep it in the gun, some pins can drift out if you drop it.

    BTW, there's no need to "upgrade" if you feel comfortable with your XT.
     
  19. OldGoat

    OldGoat Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, Steve. Sent you a PM. Best Regards, Ed
     
  20. brucestorey

    brucestorey Member

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    Ed,

    To me, the thought of traveling a few hundred miles to a shoot, with all of its included expenses (travel, registration, hotel, etc.), without a backup gun is inconceivable -- regardless of the make or condition of the primary gun.

    My current shooting partner owned and shot a Browning as his primary gun up until about a year ago. He has since switched to a Kolar because the Browning (XS) was always at the gunsmith for problems that couldn't be fixed on the kitchen table. He spent a fortune in overnight shipping, drove many a mile and missed out on many a shoot due to this. He didn't have a backup gun then and he still doesn't have one now, but the Kolar should be a little more dependable. I guess he will only realize how important a backup gun is the next (or first) time he has a problem with his Kolar at an out-of-town shoot.

    It is also nice to have a backup that is as close to the same as the primary for the times you want to send one or the other away for general maintenance such as an annual service, reblueing, trigger tune-up, etc. My primary and backup are near to identical --I can swap parts, barrels, triggers or just about anything else I might need to in a pinch. It really makes all of the sense in the world for a serious competitive shooter.

    Bruce
     
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