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Perazzi MX 8: a pain loading the bottom barrel

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Hilton55, Feb 23, 2011.

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  1. Hilton55

    Hilton55 TS Member

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    I have a MX-8 that I love to shoot but it has a quirk that bugs me. The action doesn't want to stay fully open. It closes just enough that it's a pain to put a shell in the bottom barrel. What causes this and what is the fix? Is it because the cocking bar is to long? Thanks, John
     
  2. Steve W

    Steve W Well-Known Member

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    John, it's your hammer springs.

    The springs are "very strong" (the term Lucio use), they keep enough pressure to move the barrel back.

    I rest the barrel on my toe pad than insert the shell.

    Is this the new one, or the new new one?
     
  3. gary0920

    gary0920 Member

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    Perazzi's do that. It over cocks the triggers on purpose, then sets back slightly. This ensures the sears set everytime. Next time you have your stock off, fire the triggers, then open the gun slowly and watch the sears set. They should/will set before the gun opens all the way.
     
  4. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    Usually (USUALLY) if you are just shooting one of the bbls, you can fix this problem by removing the cocking foot (very easy) from the trigger of the bbl you are not using. Then the weight of the gun will generally be enough to lever the hammer spring and keep the gun open. But all that said, I prefer a top bbl gun that does not have this situation to contend with. But if you are going to shoot bottom first for singles and handicap, remove the top bbl cocking foot and your problem will likely end.
     
  5. Hilton55

    Hilton55 TS Member

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    I found a solution for what I understand is a fairly common problem/annoyance. Marcello Giuliani is sending to me a slightly shorter cocking bar which will solve my problem. He tells me that you always want to have a little bit of flex when the barrels are open so that they do not rest directly on the receiver, but if the cocking bar is to long then the barrels close more than they should and it becomes difficult to put a shell in the bottom barrel.

    Marcello asked me to measure the cocking bar that's in my gun and he's going to ship another one to me that is just a millimeter or so shorter. I'll let everyone know how it works out.

    I recently bought a gun from him and he sent along some of his special leaf springs and firing pins. Wow, are these parts beautifully made! He is a great guy and I can't recommend him highly enough. John
     
  6. dward

    dward Member

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    It's the cocking shoe that is probably too big. If you remove the stock from the action you will be able to watch the hammers being "cocked" while you open the action. If you change the cocking rod you will affect any other trigger that you put into the gun. If you modify the individual shoe it won't change the gun, only the individual trigger.

    What is probably happening is the shoe is trying to push the hammer farther than is needed and the spring in the hammer is closing the action enough that it becomes hard to load the bottom barrel.

    With the stock off, open the action and see how far each (top and bottom) hammer travels past where it engages the sear. (there's a hole that lets you see the sear engagement) You want it to travel past a bit, but in extreme cases it is the hammers that are actually stopping the receiver from opening any farther. If you open the action without the trigger installed, and find that it doesn't open that far when the trigger is installed, the hammers are being "cocked" too far.

    This is especially important with release triggers as the hammers will ride back into the release hook to the point of breaking the hook. Been there done that. That's why it's important to make sure that there is a little "slack" in the release hooks when the action is fully open. This is why I don't recommend swapping release triggers between guns (especially type 3s).

    The opposite problem is having a shoe that is too small and won't push the hammer back far enough to engage the sear and "cock" the gun.

    In my case I shortened my shoe up to cock my gun properly by grinding the part of the shoe that rides on the hammer a bit. It's not tough to do, but may be something you want a gunsmith to do for you.

    Dan
     
  7. miketmx

    miketmx Well-Known Member

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    I have a leaf spring release trigger for my TMX. I broke several leaf springs and sent the broken pieces to Whiz White and he said there was evidence of over-cocking because of marks on the broken pieces. Since then I have swapped the cocking foot with one from a coil spring trigger.
     
  8. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    I often wonder why we (me) answer these innocent sounding queries. Obviously we do not have the answers that th poser wants.
     
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