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PEEVES- The Great White Indian

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by BigBruno, Mar 14, 2010.

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  1. BigBruno

    BigBruno TS Member

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    Boy, haven't there been some dandys? A couple of my personal favorites were Burt Lancaster in "Apache". Or maybe Chuck Conners as "Geronimo"?
     
  2. Dahaub

    Dahaub Active Member

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    Didn't you ever watch Charles Bronson in "Chato's Land" ? Thats one of the best movies about indians you will ever see. Dan
     
  3. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    As corny as some of John Wayne's movies were (like McClintock) at least real indians were in them.

    Ricardo Montalban as Little Wolf in Cheyenne Autumn is the most successful non-indian playing the role.

    Another interesting concept are white actors playing white captives raised by the indians. Paul Newman as John Russell in Hombre does a good job, though many claim his perfomance is wooden. Well, duh, it's supposed to be wooden and stoic. Contrast that with Richard Widmark, who plays Comanche Todd, raised by indians, is not very believable in that roll. The most successful of all is Mary McDonnell playing Stands With A Fist in Dances with Wolves. In Last of the Mohicans, Daniel Day-Lewis plays Hawkeye, adopted son of a Mohican chief. While he does a good job, I believe Mary McDonnell is more convincing playing a white raised by indians.

    BTW, the movie Last of the Mohicans deviates significantly from the book. Magua's sons were killed by Col. Munro's troops in the movie. In the book, Magua was expelled from his tribe for being a drunkard, and was later whipped by the British for that offense. In the movie, the younger blonde daughter, Alice Munro, dies by leaping to her death. In the book, it's her older sister Cora, referred to briefly by Sachem as Munro's "dark child". Most people think this reference is to her hair color. In the book, Cora is actually a quadroon, one-quarter negro, meaning her mother was a mulatto, half-white, half-black. Thus, the two girls have different mothers and are in fact half-sisters. And in the book, Cora dies by the knife. As for the book itself, it is almost unreadable because of the literary style Cooper used, and critics then and now judged his writing style harshly. But the book has a lot of verbal interaction between the indians, something lacking in every movie, though the 1992 film version has more of it. Ironically, Cooper mistook two tribes for each other and erroneously came to the conclusion that the Mohicans (referred to also as "Mohegans" in the book) were the extinct tribe. The Mohicans still exist. Back to the deviation of the book by the 1992 movie, it actually, for once, improves the story, because the book is so difficult to follow. (The 1992 movie actually is based more on the 1936 version that starred Randolph Scott than the book.)

    Another movie involving whites raised by indians did the exact opposite to the book. The Light in the Forest was an excellent book, written in 1953 (which means it does not suffer the formal prose style of writing that Cooper used in Last of the Mohicans, so it's vastly more readable). Disney, though, did a pretty poor job at adapting the movie to film. While entertaining, the movie does no justice to the book. The book was written in 1953, and the movie was made in 1958. I suspect the book was doomed by the movie since they were made so close together, else the book might be a classic today. It's definitely a movie that ought to be remade in the style of Dances with Wolves, Last of the Mohicans, etc.
     
  4. Barrelbulge(Fl)

    Barrelbulge(Fl) Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    You mean no one here liked "A Man named Horse' with Richard Harris.He didn't play an indian but was accepted as one. Bulge.
     
  5. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    A Man Named Horse was a good movie, but it for some reason it just didn't make my A List.

    A movie with a non-indian being accepted as an indian was Grey Wolf, starring Pierce Brosnan, who played the title role. This is based on a true story about Archibald Belaney, a British citizen who passed himself off as an indian, and was later accepted by the local tribe. While the movie touched upon some of his problems in life, it barely scratched the surface.

    Another faux indian was Iron Eyes Cody, probably most famous for his teary eyed anti-litter and anti-pollution TV commercial in the 1970s (how many here remember that?). He played indians in a lot of movies, about 200 (including A Man Named Horse), but in reality was Italian, which was not revealed until near his death. He had falsely claimed he was Cherokee and Cree. Actually, he was probably the most successful and believable non-indian to play an indian in a movie, since everyone really did believe he was a real indian.
     
  6. Bisi

    Bisi TS Member

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    Didn't Burt Reynolds play an Indian in "Gunsmoke".
     
  7. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Burt Reynolds played Quint Asper, the blacksmith, who was half white, half-indian.

    Another "half-breed" was Elvis Presly, who played Pacer Burton, half-Kiowas, in the movie Flaming Star. This was a dramatic role movie for him, but he should have stuck to singing.
     
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