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Parallel setting on scope for .22LR- Critical?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by skeet_man, Aug 20, 2009.

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  1. skeet_man

    skeet_man Well-Known Member

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    How critical is parallax setting on a scope for a .22LR? Walmart has sports afield 3-9x40 scopes for $25 (closeout from $50), but they are parallax adjusted for 100 yds. I'm putting the scope on a marlin 60, do it doesn't need to be a high end scope, but i'm wondering if I should hold out for one of the bushnell rimfire scopes thats parallax adjusted for 50 yds, which are $50 retail...
     
  2. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    I don't think it will matter very much. When you get the scope loosen the rear lense and adjust it so the cross hairs are clear and sharp.HMB
     
  3. furface

    furface Member

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    I have put WC Tasco's on several 22, they work fine. Joe
     
  4. skeet_man

    skeet_man Well-Known Member

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    thanks for the suggestions

    fred- i fail to see the need to put a $200 plus scope on a $50 gun....
     
  5. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    You shouldn't have a significant error due to parallax offset, certainly not beyond the accuracy limitations of the Marlin 60. One of my favorite .22 scopes is an old 2x7 Redfield which isn't a real high end scope but it is nice and clear and it puts the rounds on target in the field at distances between 10 and 75 yards. If I were shopping for another .22 scope, I would look at what Nikon had to offer. The other approach that I am really enjoying is a red dot optic. Really fast and reasonable accuracy out to 50 yards or so, just the ticket for those running jacks. You can get a workable red dot for around $50.
     
  6. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    Fred, as usual, is suggesting what you need to be "perfect." You'll learn to understand him in time as the rest of us who know and love him have.:)

    But he is right - 22s used at close range usually are shooting at small targets and the aiming error induced by parallax is as potentially damaging to accurately shooting at those targets at short range as it can be for a big game hunter at long range.

    A rimfire-specific scope is always better and you don't have to buy a horribly expensive one. But it isn't unusual these days for the scope to cost more than the rifle.

    Ed
     
  7. ccw1911

    ccw1911 Member

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    Parallax wouldn't be a big deal with a plinker like a Marlin 60, if you make sure the crosshairs are centered in the scope it's not a big deal anyway.

    The problem I see is that you think you're getting a 50 dollar scope for 25, it's more like giving 25 bucks for a 20 dollar scope. The Bushnell is way more than twice the scope and will give you good service.
     
  8. CalvinMD

    CalvinMD Well-Known Member

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    Just keep an eye out for one of the BSA'a...on a inexpensive 22 it will work perfect and last forever with a little care..you can get them through Sportsmans Guide or Cheaper than dirt for a song...with ring too..even better yet!
     
  9. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    I'd suggest you look at air rifle scopes. They are way more rugged than needed for a rimfire, or even a centerfire magnum, and most of them have parallax adjustments, or parallax set at short yardage.
     
  10. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    The sweet 22 and sweet 17, in addition to being parallax adjustable, have drop compensators for the specific caliber.

    All for around 70 bucks. Dumb to settle for less.

    hM
     
  11. shooter62568

    shooter62568 TS Member

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    i have and do alot of rimfire shooting , i personaly would never put a non parallax adjustable scope on a rimfire. you can only shoot as good as you can see.........
     
  12. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    I have to amplify my comment a little.

    I got a Kimber, nicest .22 I ever thought of owning. I knew I needed a parallax adjustable scope. I actually put a sweet 17 on it, and didn't care if I had the BDC or not.

    very happy with it. NOw that they have a Sweet 22 available I have to buy it, and a .17 gun to switch scopes to.

    funny how that works out...........

    HM
     
  13. crusha

    crusha TS Member

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    EE,

    I bet the Elmer's Aerospace Division charges 5 grand for a bottle of glue to a military contractor...
     
  14. Andy44

    Andy44 Active Member

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    Hawke Optics has the very best scopes for .22s! Programmable (FREE software) reticles, airgun rated, etched glass reticles, simply the best for less! I have four (4) of their scopes and found them to be top shelf at great prices!

    BTW - You will NEVER shoot well with a CHEAP scope for very long! Best to invest wisely when it concerns optics. A good quality scope will last just about forever on a .22.

    AndyH ;-)
     
  15. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    I just remembered this today. My son and I each have a Remington 541-T - mine's a sporter while his is the heavy barrel model. My rifle has a Leupold Vari-X III in 3-9x with an adjustable objective and EFR (Extended Focal Range), which means the parallax is adjustable for closer ranges instead of farther, as the name would imply. Jason's rifle wears a Burris or Bushnell standard 3-9x rifle scope.

    A few years ago, we were kidding each other about whose rifle was the most accurate and took them to our local club's 50-yard range to find out. We tried five different types of ammo and mine shot the smallest groups for both of us with all five. After kidding him about how useless all that extra weight of the heavy barrel was, we swapped scopes from rifle to rifle and reshot the test. We didn't bother to rezero them; just shot for group size. That time, his rifle was better.

    That pretty much answers the question, doesn't it?

    Ed

    By the way, the average group sizes with the Leupold scope were about the same for both rifles, so the heavy barrel really doesn't offer a real advantage in accuracy.
     
  16. cubancigar2000

    cubancigar2000 Well-Known Member

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    you can do a lot better, check out SWFA or planetoptics, you can get a $175 scope for $49
     
  17. claybrdr

    claybrdr Well-Known Member

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    As mentioned above, a BSA rimfire model will set you back around $25 and will come with a set of rings. Perfect for what you want although BSA scopes are generally crap for any other purpose....
     
  18. sliverbulletexpress

    sliverbulletexpress TS Member

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    The thing everyone seems to miss (pun intended) is that your scope is what allows you to hit what your aiming at. IT's at least if not more important than the rifle, in fact I'd rather have an low priced rifle and a good scope than the other way round. At least I can enjoy looking threw it.

    Scopes are shipped out of China from one or two factories with whatever name the customer wants on them, they are all about the same quality. The big difference is the bucks the resellers spend hyping them and giving them to gun writers to say good things about. If you are going cheap you may as well buy the cheapest and make sure you buy it from someplace that will take it back easy.

    I maintain that any scope that comes in a blister pack ain't good enough for the worst rifle I have. That goes for some other stuff too.
     
  19. Old Confederate

    Old Confederate TS Member

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    The Leupold 3x9 AO made for .22's can't be beat if you have a good .22 and can shoot. If you have a junk .22 and can't shoot you won't be able to tell the difference so it won't matter. Larry
     
  20. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    (1) The issue of parallax gets more important as more precision is demanded. Meaning target work and varmint and small game hunting where head shots are common on small animals.<br>
    <br>
    (2) Parallax is less important for plinking and for short range non-target work.<br>
    <br>
    (3) Parallax is an important issue for high quality, precision rifles, as it helps wring out the most accuracy from them.<br>
    <br>
    (4) Parallax is not as much of an issue for lower quality firearms.<br>
    <br>
    (5) The best way to resolve parallax is with an adjustable objective. If anyone is not sure what this is, the front lens element of the scope can be adjusted to minimize parallax at various ranges. Sometimes erroneously called "focus" or "range focus".<br>
    <br>
    (6) The best parallax setting for a fixed objective rimfire for field use is between 50 and 80 yards, with 50 yards being better. For target work, most target shooters get an adjustable objective, but the parallax setting could be as close as 11 yards (33 feet or 10 meters).<br>
    <br>
    In my opinion, parallax is not going to be an issue on a Marlin Model 60. So the scope you cite is probably OK. But for a few dollars more the Bushnell Sweet 17 and Sweet 22 3.5-10x40 scopes with adjustable objectives are good scopes for the money. Possibly the best of the cheap scopes. My son and I have three of them - two on 17 HMRs and one on an AR15 in 223 to see how it works (and so far it has been accurate and reliable).<br>
    <br>
    As for BSA, they are a good bang for the buck, BUT, make damn sure you have an unconditional return policy from whomever you buy them from. They do tend to have lemons.
     
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