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Pain in Triceps Muscle

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Valerie Jones, Aug 31, 2012.

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  1. Valerie Jones

    Valerie Jones Member

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    I am a new shooter (been at it for two months now). I've been going through eight to ten boxes a week. I had been kicking the crap out of my shoulder the first couple weeks, but a Kickeez pad and learning how to shoulder the gun really reduced the impact. What really bothers me is my triceps muscle. The back of my arm is so painful by the end of shooting and for days afterward. It seems so odd. Can anyone tell me why this might be or what I might be doing wrong to result in such strain/injury? I'm not a weightlifter, by any means, but my arms are in good shape. I believe my gun has been properly fitted (both by an instructor and gunfitter), so I am guessing that is not the problem.
     
  2. oz

    oz Active Member

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    sounds like you are trying to push the gun away. Pull the gun firmly into your shoulder.
     
  3. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Stop what you are doing until you find out what is going on. Some thing is not right. Can you describe your equipment for us? HMB
     
  4. Valerie Jones

    Valerie Jones Member

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    Thanks for the response, guys. I am shooting a BT-99 which has been fitted with a Graco adjustable plate and a Kickeez pad. I am headed to the range right now, Oz, so I will try to focus on the possibility that I might be pushing the gun forward. That is a very interesting possibility.

    And I agree, hmb, something does not seem right. If I can't figure out the "culprit," I suppose I might have to seek medical advice.
     
  5. BigM-Perazzi

    BigM-Perazzi Well-Known Member

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    also the loads you are using...
     
  6. Rich219

    Rich219 Active Member

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    Which arm? Right handed or left handed shooter?
     
  7. Valerie Jones

    Valerie Jones Member

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    I am using one ounce no. 8s.
     
  8. 2oneight

    2oneight Member

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    Be sure to get your neck checked out!! A compressed cervical disc can cause those symptoms.
    I speak from personal experience.
    Doc
     
  9. BigM-Perazzi

    BigM-Perazzi Well-Known Member

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    well, I've found several things can contribute to pounding the shoulder joint/ muscles.

    one being length of pull. One person can have a variance based on the stance chosen. A skeet like, facing the trap stance would require a shorter lop, delivering more of the recoil to the joint.

    a stance more rifle like, requires a longer lop, and tends to lessen the impact on the shoulder joint.

    also, pitch of the stock will play into it..
     
  10. SevenMaryThree

    SevenMaryThree Member

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    Valerie,

    Are you a female? If so, physiology (upper body strength specifically) might have something to do with it. Going from zero to 250 reps a week of a muscle group that was previously under utilized is a big jump.

    Stay hydrated ahead of time. Take Vitamin C to aid in muscle recovery & soreness. Take an NSAID before inflammation sets in. And almost most importantly...take the time to stretch before you shoot.

    Very few shooters - male or female - take the time to get limber before they perform. Not only does it prepare yourself for the repetition, it releases endorphins that have a calming effect on your mind.

    Good shooting.
     
  11. Bill Stern

    Bill Stern Member

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    As a former strength and conditioning coach, I must say that triceps hurting from shooting sounds very strange. The triceps should not come into play when shooting, unless, as another writer suggested, you are pushing the gun away instead of pulling it into your shoulder. Have a knowledgeable shooter watch you shoot. If you're pushing the gun away, it will be clear to the observer.
     
  12. GrandpasArms

    GrandpasArms Active Member

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    Medications used to lower cholesterol are often associated with muscle and joint pain. Statins are the most notorious, but they all do the same thing.

    Larry J. Frieders, RPh |
    http://about.me/larryfrieders
    The Compounder Pharmacy |
    340 Marshall, Unit 100 ~ Aurora, IL 60506 Tel 630.859.0333 FAX: 630.859.0114 |
     
  13. Ross

    Ross Well-Known Member

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    Valerie: Unless your daily routine requires physical upper body movements and strength I think SevenMaryThree is on the right track, you are using muscles that you don't use in your daily life ie try riding a bicycle a couple miles when you haven't ridden for a long time. One thing that might help is practice mounting your gun at home (EMPTY of course) a couple dozen times spaced (timed) just like you were shooting a round of trap, doing this in sets just like you were shooting will help strengthen those unused muscles, also when time permits do them several times a day. It may take a while to build up those specific muscles so don't get discouraged. Good Luck--have fun. Ross Puls
     
  14. Valerie Jones

    Valerie Jones Member

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    I am female and I shoot right-handed.

    I just got back from shooting four rounds. Best I can tell, I am not pushing the gun. I really tried to pay attention to that and I don't think that's the case. I did notice, however, I seem to have a really tight grip and wonder whether I might need to loosen up a little bit.

    The pain seemed to start up right after I had the stock fitted. Up to that point, I'd only been shooting a couple of weeks and was really kicking the crap out of the front of my shoulder/collarbone area. I had about two inches taken off when I had the adjustable plate and pad added. That improved the shoulder pain drastically, but that's when the back side of my arm started hurting. Also at about the same time, I had my first lesson and my instructor suggested I do everything with my right hand. So, in addition to shooting, I am loading and extracting my shells and dumping them in the back of my vest. I can't imagine that repetition would be the cause, but I guess it might be possible. Doesn't seem probable, though. My biceps are no worse for wear.

    I will be shooting tomorrow and Sunday with some experienced shooters. I will speak with them and see if they can notice something I might be doing.

    I am going to chalk it up to poor muscle stamina . . . for now. That really does make good sense. I am shooting enough that that should change soon enough. If not, I will explore other avenues.

    I can't tell you how much I love this new (for me) sport. I really am having a great time. I am addicted and determined to do well. My discouraging days serve only to get me out there again to do better. I appreciate your comments.
     
  15. k-gunguy

    k-gunguy Member

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    You are forgetting the fact that you are lifting a 8 to 9lb gun,many times more than you have before. You are not doing anything wrong,you are just not used to this. Some push-ups will build up your stamina,and help with your movements to the targets.
    Glenn
     
  16. gdbabin

    gdbabin TS Member

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    "Valerie are you a female?"



    Simply priceless!



    Guy B.
     
  17. Shooting Sailor

    Shooting Sailor Well-Known Member

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    Guy - Why would that be priceless? I have known a Valerie and an Evelyn who were male, and two Michaels who were female.
     
  18. Ross

    Ross Well-Known Member

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    Shooting Sailor: I agree I also know 2 guys named Beverly they go by Bev, and 2 or 3 named Caroll that's with two Ls and several named Francis with an "i" (the i as in him) that's the masculine spelling, they all go by Frank. My mothers name was Frances with an "e" (the "e" as in her)that's the feminine spelling. But then my name is Ross another uncommon name so I guess I didn't pay close enough attention. Ross Puls
     
  19. BigM-Perazzi

    BigM-Perazzi Well-Known Member

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    I would expect a Sailor to know guys named Valerie and Evelyn....

    "long voyage, baby?"
     
  20. slowdp

    slowdp TS Member

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    I don't understand why the instructor would have you do everything right handed.This seems clumsy to me. I keep my right hand on the wrist of the stock and break the gun. The shells and empties bag is kept on my left. As the gun breaks open I hold my left hand over the breach area to stop the ejected shell from flying, remove it with my left hand, get a fresh one from the shell box and load the gun. The muzzle is placed on my toe or a pad to keep the weight of the gun out of my arm.

    Keeping the shells and the empties bag on the left help to avoid damage to the gun also.

    Oddly though, most of the right handed shooters at the range will keep everything on the right, hold the gun at the receiver with the left hand and do everything with their right hand. That is too much stuff on the right side for me.

    Just another opinion from a different one.
     
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