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OT: Your Best Recipe for BBQ Pork Ribs.

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by map@neo, Aug 29, 2007.

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  1. map@neo

    map@neo Member

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    How about it??? Share your "secret" recipe for the finest taste'n ribs this
    side of Hog Heaven!!! Wet or dry. Please include all the ingredients, cooking temps. and cooking times. You won't win a prize here, but you'll defineately win some smiles.
    Thanks.
    MAP
     
  2. MX/MT

    MX/MT TS Member

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    The best I've made were after I discovered the smoker.

    Smoke racks of ribs for 'bout 4 hours with your choice of wood chips - I prefer mesquite.

    Throw'em on the grill and slather with your favorite sauce 'til they're a little crisp around the edges.

    You can get as involved as you like, but the basic process remains the same.
     
  3. map@neo

    map@neo Member

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    Any coating or rub applied while in the smoker? What is the temperature for 4 hours?
    Thanks.
    MAP
     
  4. Steelheader

    Steelheader TS Member

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    I put on a mixed rub of containing bavarian spice & gateway to the north spice mixes from the Spice House in Milwaukee, WI. (No MSG in their spices mixes) drizzle on honey and refridgerate over night. Smoke them for no more than 4 hours with a fruit wood (apple or peach). Fire up a good hot charcoal grill and sear the racks on the outside to hold the moisture. Then I bake them at 275 for 3 to 4 hours in an oven. You know when their done when the meat shrinks down from the bone slightly.
    Steelheader
     
  5. Whiz Bang

    Whiz Bang TS Member

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    Go to www.thesmokering.com click on the forums. All your questions will be answered there. The best site for Bar-B Que on the net.
     
  6. Pump4Smoke

    Pump4Smoke Member

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    All excellent choices!! How long before boiling comes up? The Horror!!
     
  7. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    I have been having great results with Moore County dry rub (Jack Daniels cook book) rubbed into skinned ribs and then hanging the racks of ribs in a 'smoke stack' cooker for about 3 hours @ 275F. The 'smoke stack' cooker is a rectangular 2'x2'x3' brick structure with a damper at the base and a flat metal top. A 55 gal bbl could be made to work about the same.

    The great thing about the hanging meat in the smoke stack is that you really don't have to do much other than check the temp occasionally and adjust the damper accordingly. We use mesquite wood to make the coals and sprinke in some wet hickory chips every now and then. (it helps the cooking process to consume a few cold beverages)

    The ribs come out very tender with little standing fat. If you like sauce, drizzle some of your favorite BBQ sauce (heated) over the ribs after you cut them off the rack but don't try using the sauces during the cooking process, it ruins both the meat and the sauce.
     
  8. chessney

    chessney TS Member

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    Barfin..Question: How do you make chicken stock? Answer: You boil it! Why would boil ribs? You lose all the great taste from your ribs..Never Never boil your ribs!!! Ziggy
     
  9. MGeslock

    MGeslock TS Member

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    The Rib Mop

    Ingredients:

    1 Tbs. Butter
    1 Med Onion finely chopped
    8 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
    1 can (12 oz.) tomato paste
    1 cup red wine vinegar
    1/2 cup Water
    1/2 cup Molasses
    1/2 cup firmly packed dark brown sugar
    3 Tbs. Worcestershire sauce
    3 Tbs. chili powder
    1 Tbs. dry mustard

    Directions:
    Melt the butter in a medium-size saucepan over low heat. Stir in the onion and garlic and sauté gently until golden. Add the tomato paste and mix well. Blend in the vinegar, water, and molasses. Add the brown sugar, Worcestershire sauce, and, a little at a time, the chili powder and dry mustard, stirring well after each addition. Simmer, stirring occasionally, for about 30 minutes, or until the sauce is thick. Remove from the heat and set aside until needed for basting.



    More to come!!
     
  10. MGeslock

    MGeslock TS Member

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    Your path to better ribs will take many twists 'n turns. You should consider the Selection of the Ribs (size, type, cost), Actual Preparation, Cooking Techniques, Finishing Sauces and Servings. We will help you make your ribs better than ever. Ok?, Let's begin...

    Selection of the Ribs: All ribs are not the same. There are spares, country, babies, St. Louis and more. For this discussion, we will be considering all ribs the same, with the exception of the country style ribs which are not really ribs at all. For better ribs, don't go with the "end of the week", $1 off previously frozen, clearance ribs. Try to get them just as fresh as possible. Look for pink meat as opposed to the darker, red meat. The fat on ribs should be white and not off-white and should be interspersed. Additionally, it should be noted that older animals make for tougher cuts of meat. Using this line of thinking, the smaller ribs (weight-wise) will generally be more tender.
    When selecting spare ribs look for 3.5 pounds or less in weight. Anything much higher than this weight will tend to be less tender and will have to be cooked longer.
    St. Louis Spare Ribs are similar to the regular spare ribs, with the notable exception that the "belly-flap/extra fat has been removed leaving clean bones on both ends of the rib. The ribs are straighter and have less of a curve to the bones. These are really nice ribs that make a great presentation. Some caution should expressed as we have noticed that some meat companies are presenting what they call St. Louis Style Ribs that are cut so that there are not bones at one end.
    Baby-Back ribs (Loin-back) are smaller and generally more tender. When selecting these ribs, look for the size to be 1.5 to 2 pounds each. They will cost more per pound, however you will be getting more tenderloin meat which is just more tender. The extra cost is reasonable based upon the quality of the meat.
    The Preparation Process: Ah, yes, the finely barbecued rack of ribs needs to be "prepared" in order to be done correctly! Preparation consists of a few short steps. They need cleaning, stripping, trimming and dressing.
    Cleaning: After removing your ribs from the packaging, rinse them under cold running water and rub gently on both sides. Wash off any blood and remove loose hanging fat, if present. Once the ribs are clean, take some paper towels and pat-dry the ribs on both sides and place them on a clean cutting board, ready for "Stripping".


    Stripping: As you might expect, stripping can be the most fun. Contrary to what you might be imaging at this moment, we are going to be removing the membrane from the inside of the ribs. Many restaurants will skip this step in effort to save time and money. We have found that by removing the membrane from the ribs, the seasoning that is added to the ribs better seasons the meat.
    Start on the larger end of the ribs and gently place a clean elongated object under the membrane [between the membrane and the rest of the ribs]. You can use a round-tipped knife, spoon, phillips-head screwdriver, anything that will allow you to slip under the membrane and still not pierce it. Next, slip your fingers under the membrane making the gap a little larger. Once you have this done, then take a paper towel and grab the membrane and pull towards the smaller end. Continue until all the membrane has been removed.
    Trimming: Now we move into the "slicing-n-dicing" arena. We have found that the majority of the baby-back (again, known as loin-back ribs) will have small bone fragments in the meat, particularly at the larger end of the ribs. Take either a boning knife or a small paring knife and carefully remove the bone fragments. Your guests will appreciate the effort even though they might know that you have even done it.

    We also trim/remove the excess fat from the top, side and ends of the ribs. True, the fat will render, but we don't enjoy any fatty remnants which might remain on the meat should it not completely be rendered.
    Dressing: After stripping and trimming the ribs, it is time to get 'em dressed once again. Go to the frig and grab some plain old French's yellow mustard and a pastry brush. Next coat one side of the ribs with the yellow mustard. The coating should not be heavy and you should still see the color of the meat through the mustard.
    Don't like mustard, not to worry. You will not taste it once the ribs have been cooked. The mustard helps make a "flavor bark, or skin" on the ribs. More about that in the next paragraph.
    Next get your favorite pork dry rub (such as Pig Powder, Butt Rub Seasoning, Bone Suckin' Rib Rub, Paul Kirk Oregon Seasoning, more) and gently sprinkle you ribs, both sides, with the rub. Keep in mind that you are trying to season the MEAT, and not make the meat taste just like the seasoning. We sprinkle the meat with the seasoning so that we can still see some of the yellow mustard and not much of the meat itself. Keep in mind that when the seasoning will be more mellow after cooking for several hours that it is once out of the jar/package. Allow this to sit for about 30 minutes. During this time, the dry rub will begin to gently absorb some of the moisture from the meat. Once they look "wet" it's time to place them on the pit. If you allow the rub to sit on the meat for extended periods of time, it will continue to draw moisture out of the meat, which is not exactly the results you might be desiring!
    Barbecuing Techniques: Your ribs should not be cooked directly over your fire. Rather, they should be placed in indirect heat with the fire/heat source on one side of the pit and the ribs on the other. Ideally, the heat and smoke should rise, pass over the meat and exit on the other side of the ribs. In such manner the gentle heat and wafting, wood smoke flavoring surrounds the ribs engulfing your pride 'n joy with rich smoky flavor.

    Basting: You should baste your ribs. Basting adds additional flavor and help keep the ribs moist. Since you have added mustard and dry rubs to create a moist flavorful coating to your ribs, we suggest allowing your ribs to sit quietly on the smoker/grill soaking up the smoke flavors while maintaining a constant 225 to 250 degrees for the first several hours. This allows the rub to create a dry skin or bark (like a tree's bark). This bark adheres to the meat and the basting to follow will not wash-off the seasoning. Once your skin is in tact, then we suggest basting every 30 minutes until the ribs are complete. You should cook your ribs somewhere from 6-8 hours.

    Bastes: The type of different flavoring bastes can vary greatly. The one constant is that it should not contain any tomato products and very little, if any sugars. Some acceptable sugars might include juices. The video you can view is simple and uses only butter and apple juice. Take that as a starting base and add to it!
    Now, how long are you going to cook your ribs? What exactly does " done" mean? Our "rule-of-thumb" for producing near perfect ribs every time, regardless of the type of rib you are cooking is as follows:
    When lifting the ribs at one end with a set of tongs (KEY: 1/3rd to 1/2 of the ribs should be inside the grip of the tongs and gently "bounce" the other end of the ribs) the meat should "crack" and begin to leave the bone - not pull away from the bone. If you find the rib meat "clearly breaking away from the bone",your ribs have been overcooked. If you can bounce the ends all over the place, they are not done yet!
    [Hint for Producing Bad Ribs: If you are of the mind set that in order for the meat to be correctly done it must "fall off the bone", then simply cook your ribs way too long. We guarantee you will accomplish your goal.] However, if you want them cooked just right and not tough, then use our guide for perfect ribs.

    Finishing Sauces : Ok, we now have some finished ribs just about ready for their debut. We've been cooking for hours and we are now allowing the temperatures to decline since we are not trying to cook the ribs any longer. If you, like us, want to add one last bit of flavor to the ribs coming off the grill, we use a finishing sauce. We allow the pit temps to decline to about 125 to 150 degrees. This is key to applying your finishing sauce because you do not want the sauce to burn. You are simply trying to get the finishing sauce to dry slightly and become "tacky to the touch".
    Unlike the basting sauce you used when cooking [which contains no tomato or sugar products] the finishing sauce is a thin, flavorful sweet tomato sauce. We select our favorite barbecue sauce, call it your secret weapon/ingredients), thin it with apple juice, white wine, liquor or other digestible liquid. This "special weapon" will add additional flavor to your ribs. As a certified barbecue judge, we have found that most competition ribs presented to judges at BBQ contests, do in fact, use finishing sauces. Utilizing a finishing sauce is a personal preference, however. You might want to try them different ways to see which you enjoy the best.
    Finishing sauces add a nice glaze to the ribs and a final taste of flavor.
    Serving Styles: Your ribs are now ready for serving. Most meats are their juiciest just after being sliced. Once sliced and exposed to the air, they begin to dry out. We suggest slicing your ribs just prior to serving. CAUTION: Be prepared for Oooos and Ahhhs that will be forth coming. Best of luck to you. We hope you have fun!
     
  11. bigbore613

    bigbore613 Active Member

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    Mark, I tried to put your pics on through photobucket to no avail. Jeff
     
  12. djpk69

    djpk69 TS Member

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    Take your "good" (baby back prefered)ribs....put them on a rack (under a pan).Don't need any spices. Set oven for 225 degrees.Bake for 2-3 hours......SLOW. Then double wrap in foil with your "Best" sause. Bake at 200 degrees for another 2 hours. Fallin' off the bone GOOD .
     
  13. djpk69

    djpk69 TS Member

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    Thanks Chessney........DO NOT EVER BOIL RIBS....we're not making soup ! Par boiling is for rookies ...would you boil a good stea before cooking it???
     
  14. djpk69

    djpk69 TS Member

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    Intsert STEAK for stea !!
     
  15. MGeslock

    MGeslock TS Member

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    Rub it.
     
  16. MGeslock

    MGeslock TS Member

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    Charcoal it.
     
  17. MGeslock

    MGeslock TS Member

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    Smoke LOW and Slow
     
  18. MGeslock

    MGeslock TS Member

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    Don't poke them
     
  19. MGeslock

    MGeslock TS Member

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  20. MGeslock

    MGeslock TS Member

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    Save this for last!!
     
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