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OT- woodworking tools question re planes

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Porcupine, Jul 14, 2010.

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  1. Porcupine

    Porcupine Active Member

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    I inherited three woodworking planes. I do some woodworking, but it seems there's always some sort of power tool to do what a plane can do. Am I wrong? Should I hang onto these tools or try to sell them? Thanks for any help.

    LA in MA
     
  2. Porcupine

    Porcupine Active Member

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    Another photo
     
  3. Bob Hawkes

    Bob Hawkes Well-Known Member

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    Ouch!! First thing my Uncle taught me was to never set a plane down as shown, always on it's side so you didn't damage the blade. :>) You rarely have a need for them today, but one or two is still handy to have around. I have no idea what they are worth at a yard sale, certainly more than the old bit braces I have which you never find a use for today. Good luck and enjoy, Bob
     
  4. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    You have three very nice planes - all look to be in good shape.

    Yes, they are useful even today - I have a power plane for the big jobs, but the old hand ones like these are still the best for the finish work.

    Two of yours are by Stanley, I can't make out the name on the third.

    These have quite a bit of value to collectors - I would do some research before you sell them (if you do).

    I think you are OK sitting them on cardboard - not on wood or other hard surfaces.

    Sharpening them, and setting them up takes some skill, but once you learn it is not too bad.

    Good luck with the family heirlooms.

    David D
     
  5. capvan

    capvan Active Member

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    It was funny reading Mr. Hawkes reply. That was the first thing I thought when I saw the picture...never, never lay a plane down this way. Putting it on it's side is the rule.

    Find a really good sharpening shop that can put a hollow ground edge on these planes if you can. Sharpness is key. They can be a delight to use, once you get the hang of it...

    Bruce
     
  6. bigbore613

    bigbore613 Active Member

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    If the frogs up and the blade retracted displaying like this hurts nothing. Nice old planes and still have many uses.Keep em is my vote ! Jeff
     
  7. Ljutic111

    Ljutic111 TS Member

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    I have about 20 all wood molding planes that I took all apart , steel wooled the plane and wedge , made from Maple I believe and put a coat of linsead oil on them , sharpened all the tool faces and put them on the shelf about 20 years ago . Might be interested in selling some of mine . I see them at sales for $30-35 apiece .
     
  8. WS-1

    WS-1 Banned User Banned

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    From the left you have a rabbet plane, a jack plane, and a block plane. Carpenters used a rabbet plane to plow the rabbet for door jambs, end dados for finished ends of cabinets or book cases, or other cuts where one component of a project could be "jambed" into the rabbet of another. They could also be used for tenoning the ends of cross rails of doors or wainscot, etc. Carpenters used jack planes to clean off the ruff surface of undressed lumber from the sawmill. They would "face" the flat surface and joint the edge. They would then glue faced and edged boards together edgewise to make wider boards for cabinets or table tops. A jack plane was the tool to use to straighten up a long edge like the side stile of a house door. They could be used to taper legs of tables. They would be the tool of choice for chamfering one or more corners of table legs. Block planes were used by carpenters to cut across the end grain of components. If a door frame sagged, and the door stuck, a carpenter could climb up his step ladder, hold the door with one hand, the jack plane with the other and with many shallow cuts, trim the side stile until it cleared the sagging door jamb.

    The keys to effective use of a hand plane are as follows; the blade must be very sharp. Whetting and stropping are worth the time. The grind hook angle must be severely long and though hollow grinding is not necessary, it will make later whetting easier. When setting the blade against the chipbreaker, allow about 1/8" margin of exposed blade. Set the blade in the plane so that only the tiniest amount of sharp edge is exposed below the jointing table. The set will need to be adjusted to suit the user but thin cuts are easier on the hands and arms and they leave smoother surfaces.

    You now own three very nice planes. If there is a sawmill near you, try to buy about ten to twenty board feet of the softest wood they harvest. Put it in the loft of your shed until Thanksgiving, and then take it down and build something of your own design with it. It will make you happy.

    Kit Thomas
     
  9. Savage99Stan

    Savage99Stan Active Member

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    Excellent explanation Kit. I have my block and jack plane plus a couple of my granddads. Use them sometimes to slice a sliver off a door, or whatever. Sharpening is no big problem if you have a steady hand on the grinder and a good square oilstone.

    Agree...don't set them down on the edge.

    I'll give you five bucks each plus shipping.
     
  10. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    They are not used very often anymore. Although I keep a couple of small ones around. They are handy when my power unit is to big, or a hand scraper is to lite. Some people collect them.
     
  11. larrystrollo

    larrystrollo Member

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    If you inherited them then restore them, use them, and see that they're passed on. I have some tools that used to belong to my grandfather, and every time I pick them up I think about him. That's worth more than the dollar value of the tools, at least to me.
     
  12. Bob Hawkes

    Bob Hawkes Well-Known Member

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    Good explanation Kit. You made me go back and look closer at the plane on the left, your rabbet. I remember years ago the rabbet plane I knew was small, maybe 3/4 or an inch wide, odd configuration for fitting cabinet doors. I jumped so quick to poke fun at the position of the planes I didn't appreciate what I was looking at. Planes still have their use, unlike the old good mitre boxes. Very expensive, and I don't care how good you were, they can't compare with the good compound power saws out there now. Good woodworkers are a dying breed. Shoot well, Bob
     
  13. WS-1

    WS-1 Banned User Banned

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    Bob and Stan,

    Thanks for the compliments. I was so unbelievably lucky as a kid. My Granddaddy was a carpenter, boatbuilder, and waterman. He taught me how to shoot when I was 6 years old with a Remington M-12 .22 that I still have. He would whet his pocket knife and let me whittle for hours. If I cut myself, he'd just smile and clean me up.

    Granddaddy called the blade of a plane an "iron" but I didn't want to use that terminology here because I figured somebody would call me on it. Porcupine, most of the components of a hand plane are mild steel or cast iron, but an "iron" is made of lightly tempered steel and is harder to sharpen with slip stones or oil stones but once you get an edge that will shave the hair on the back of your arm, you will be able to dress lumber with relative ease. The edge of a piece of honduras mahogany that has been jointed with a sharp jack plain will look translucent if you catch the light just right.

    Anyhow, after the Army, I went to the mill and served my apprenticeship under several of the best architectural woodworkers in the world. I struck out on my own in 1976 and I had a pretty good run. Fact is, I just got my first Christmas order last weekend....a toy box for my 2 year old Granddaughter. I got a piece of clear poplar that is 18" wide so I'm going to make her a
    "6-board chest" with bracket feet and dovetailed corners. Life is good.

    Kit
     
  14. Bob Hawkes

    Bob Hawkes Well-Known Member

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    "Shave the hair", boy oh boy, wasn't that the test Kit? :)
     
  15. WS-1

    WS-1 Banned User Banned

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    Bob,

    Every three or four years, Granddaddy and my Uncle Billy would build a skiff in the back yard. My cousin and I would clam and crab off those skiffs. Granddaddy would row us around the creeks after he retired. It's funny how you learn everything about life that you'll ever need to know from men like my Granddaddy.

    Kit
     
  16. schockstrap

    schockstrap Active Member

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    I'm not sure where you guys get the impression that hand planes aren't used much any more... I don't think you could be a serious woodworker without at least one. Lie-Nielsen appears to be doing quite well selling their hand planes for $400-$500 a pop (and more). Granted, I'll use my jointer to face and joint most boards, but the hand plane and scrapers get used all the time to smooth the surface prior to finishing.

    --Dan
     
  17. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    Schockstrap; I know guys that won't use anything but hand tools. No power equipment at all. Old World Woodworkers. So, if that's your thing, go for it........
     
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