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OT: Wiring a Shed

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by DanBee, Jan 29, 2009.

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  1. DanBee

    DanBee TS Member

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    I want to wire my 12X24 wooden storage shed. Just 3 or 4 outlets and two to three light fixtures. Biggest dilemma is whether there is a good reason to run it all in conduit or just string the Romex and staple to studs. If conduit, should I use the metal or plastic? Thanks.
     
  2. 635 G

    635 G Well-Known Member

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    If cost is no object use EMT & steel boxes, if you ever want to change anything, all you have to do is pull another conducter. In the shed the best thing you can do is put a 60 amp 250v sub panel with space for at least 8 breakers. Use a two pole 60 as a main & you will have six free spaces for any future needs. single pole 15 for lights, 2 single pole 20 for outlets & 3 spare spaces for heat, compressor, etc. When I wired sheds that were subject to physical damage I always used EMT & pulled a separated ground wire even though the NEC doesn't require it. PVC tends to sag in hot spaces & onless its stapped very often it doesn't look too professional. If its for you do it right.

    Phil Berkowitz
     
  3. squirrelkiller

    squirrelkiller TS Member

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    Got rats, got mice. Mice really not that big a problem. Rats are a different story. If you do, get a cat or run conduit. I have some ran in outbuildings and have had no problem for years. Got quite a few mouse exterminators roaming around though. In the "old" days, hardly nothing was ran in conduit on the farm.
     
  4. DTrykow

    DTrykow Active Member

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    Conduit for sure. Also get covered outlets. Mud Wasps, etc tend to fill up the round grounding hole for a nest. Dave T.
     
  5. grnberetcj

    grnberetcj Active Member

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    I hate to actually state the following...but here's what I did (so don't get excited about codes, etc) and it has worked exceptionally well for the past 4 yrs. (since 4/05).

    Ran a 12 ga. hvy duty extension cord from the 30 amp. outlet at my pool to the shed (25 ft.). Placed it about 4 - 5 inches in the ground by using a spade shovel, once in the shed, cut off the female end and ran it into a junction box. From there I have 1 outside light, 1 outside recepticle, 1 inside light and 1 recepticle. No heavy loads.

    Now I know this is not even close to being the best way and this spring, I'll have it done correctly as I'll be getting rid of the old shed and building a new shed/pool house. This time a licensed electrician will do the work.

    Curt
     
  6. Shooting Jack

    Shooting Jack Active Member

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    I prefer to drill holes through the studs to run the wires and make it easy to attach plugs, switches etc. I use plactic conduit but either works well and provides some good hangars for tools. You can also drill the holes through the studs and insert plastic conduit for hangars higher up. This way you don't have a bunch of nails sticking out. Jackie B.
     
  7. raymerlo

    raymerlo Member

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    try the aluminum bx,it's lite like beer,easy to run flexible and rodent proof
     
  8. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    The Carlon plastic is ok too, and easy to work with. The tubing is flexible and can be placed just about anywhere.

    Quality of the job is up to your own standards.

    HM
     
  9. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    The only problem with armored cable is the risk of short circuits.

    When cutting the shielding (there is actually a special tool for this and this is what you should use) you tend to leave a sharp metal end that can rub through the insulation. The cutting tool decreases this, but you should ALWAYS use the small anti-short inserts to protect the wires from the raw end of the shielding, no matter what (they look like small funnels).

    The OLD form of this cable was called Greenfield (it's really heavy), and was the number one cause of electrical fires (not knob and tube) for this very reason.

    Conduit, Romex, UF feeder - all could be used - just be sure to place the wire where people will NOT be tempted to hang things on it... Perhaps run it right at the top plate with feeds coming down where you need them.

    David D
     
  10. skeeljc

    skeeljc Supporting Vendor Supporting Vendor

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    You can run underground romex to the shed (just make a slit with a flat shovel and bury it 6" deep). Wire the shed with regular romex. Decon bait boxes will take care of any potential critter problems. It is a good idea to use a ground fault circuit breaker at the power source. Staple the romex to the studs. It does not have to be fancy to be functional.

    Jim Skeel
     
  11. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    Jim is right. If you cover the walls code wants a nail plate on each stud. Apparently too many drywallers hit the Romex.

    HM
     
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