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OT: The Worlds Largest Engine....WOW!

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by train222, Jun 17, 2013.

  1. train222

    train222 Well-Known Member

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    Thought you might enjoy looking at this....

    Stu Gabriel (MrGun)

    _______________________________________________________________________________

    Now that's an engine...


    [​IMG]



    The Wartsila-Sulzer RTA96-C turbocharged two-stroke diesel engine is the most powerful and most efficient prime-mover in the world today. The Aioi Works of Japan 's Diesel United, Ltd built the first engines and is where some of these pictures were taken. It is available in 6 through 14 cylinder versions, all are inline engines. These engines were designed primarily for very large container ships. Ship owners like a single engine/single propeller design and the new generation of larger container ships needed a bigger engine to propel them. The cylinder bore is just under 38" and the stroke is just over 98". Each cylinder displaces 111,143 cubic inches (1820 liters) and produces 7780 horsepower. Total displacement comes out to 1,556,002 cubic inches (25,480 liters) for the fourteen cylinder version.


    Some more facts on the 14 cylinder version:
    Total engine weight: 2300 tons (The crankshaft alone weighs 300 tons).
    Length: 89 feet
    Height: 44 feet
    Maximum power: 108,920 hp at 102 rpm
    Maximum torque: 5,608,312 lb/ft at 102rpm


    Fuel consumption at maximum power is 0.278 lbs per hp per hour (Brake Specific Fuel Consumption). Fuel consumption at maximum economy is 0.260 lbs/hp/hour. At maximum economy the engine exceeds 50% thermal efficiency. That is, more than 50% of the energy in the fuel in converted to motion. For comparison, most automotive and small aircraft engines have BSFC figures in the 0.40-0.60 lbs/hp/hr range and 25-30% thermal efficiency range. Even at its most efficient power setting, the big 14 consumes 1,660 gallons of heavy fuel oil per hour.


    A cross section of the RTA96C:



    [​IMG]



    The internals of this engine are a bit different than most automotive engines. The top of the connecting rod is not attached directly to the piston. The top of the connecting rod attaches to a "crosshead" which rides in guide channels. A long piston rod then connects the crosshead to the piston. I assume this is done so the sideways forces produced by the connecting rod are absorbed by the crosshead and not by the piston. Those sideways forces are what makes the cylinders in an auto engine get oval-shaped over time.



    These guys are installing the "thin-shell" bearings.
    Crank and rod journals are 38" in diameter and 16" wide.



    [​IMG]




    The crankshaft sitting in the block (also known as a "gondola-style" bedplate). This is a 10 cylinder version. Note the steps by each crank throw that lead down into the crankcase.



    [​IMG]



    A piston and piston rod assembly. The piston is at the top. The
    large square plate at the bottom is where the whole assembly attaches to the crosshead.



    [​IMG]



    Some pistons and piston rods


    The "spikes" on the piston rods are hollow tubes that go into the holes you can see on the bottom of the pistons (top picture) and inject oil into the inside of the piston which keeps the top of the piston from overheating. Some high-performance auto engines
    have a similar feature where anoil squirter nozzle squirts oil onto
    the bottom of the piston.


    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]



    The cylinder deck (10 cylinder version).
    Cylinder liners are die-cast ductile cast iron.
    Look at the size of those head studs!



    [​IMG]



    The first completed 12 cylinder engine:



    [​IMG]
     
    Doggy, Floorplate and Eddiefromoverlook thanked this.
  2. Shooting Jack

    Shooting Jack Active Member

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    That's pretty amazing. It's hard for me to imagine the structure needed in a ship to support that kind of weight. Back in 1970, while stationed in Fukaoka I would often visit a naval base(Sasabo) and there was a ship building facility next to it. They were building a barge/ship for shipping oil and it was huge. The USS Coral Sea was anchored off shore and I had always thought it was so big until I saw the ship they were building. They were almost completing it and it had been three years round the clock to build it. The section closest to the base housed the engine and it was huge. I wonder if it was one of these engines on a smaller scale? You never know what you'll see next. LOL Jackie B.
     
  3. avery53

    avery53 Member

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    That is very impressive, would love to see it in person.
     
  4. need to shoot more

    need to shoot more Active Member

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    what size is the exhaust on that mother?
     
  5. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    What does an oils change cost?

    Very impressive!
     
  6. kiv-c

    kiv-c Member

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    I sure wouldn't want to be nearby if it threw a rod!
     
  7. jwells

    jwells Member

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    it is impressive, but the bigger they build the more junk china can load in them. not to mention the arab oil tankers. make it here and drill here.
     
  8. GunDr

    GunDr Well-Known Member

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    The above engine would probably run better if it had a tuned chip installed along with a larger exhaust pipe...(haha)
     
  9. Catpower

    Catpower Molon Labe TS Supporters

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    Rick they have a big crank with a bunch of chinamen spinning it LOL

    I imagine they have some kind of decompression device to let what ever they use to get it spinning

    I have a couple John Deere diesels that were made in the 50' that use a V4 gas engine to spin the diesel over to get it started they have decompression levers on them, I used to think they were big, one has almost 500 CU in two holes

    But they are pretty small compared to that thing

    Amazing the big stuff that man can build
     
  10. N. J. BOB

    N. J. BOB Active Member

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    At 102 RPM it develops max torque and HP... It should last forever at thet RPM ????
     
  11. CalvinMD

    CalvinMD Well-Known Member

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    Would be cool to have all those ponies under the hood of my pickup...GETTING the hood closed might be a slight problem
     
  12. Joe Potosky

    Joe Potosky Well-Known Member

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    Can any U.S. company build something on that scale?
     
  13. Catpower

    Catpower Molon Labe TS Supporters

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    Rick I have a 720, 730 and 830, the 730 is electric start, it is my "free" tractor from hell, I traded a bunch of A/C equipment for it, and I swear it hates me every time I run it something breaks, I need to let somebody else have the fun of working on it. I got it in 97 and with all the parts I have had to put in it it is about a 1990 730, I looked at the flywheel end of the crank as that was the weak spot, but after I got it I looked at the clutch end it was shot
     
  14. WS-1

    WS-1 Banned User Banned

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    The "Old Timers" down at NNSB&DDCo. would've shit their britches if they'd ever
    seen anything like that.
     
  15. Peter Sinclare

    Peter Sinclare Active Member

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    The words on the wall behind the 10 cyl picture is Korean. Maybe that picture was taken in Korea.
     
  16. jeffprigge

    jeffprigge Active Member

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    FAST - N - LOUD !!! LOL
     
  17. 635 G

    635 G Well-Known Member

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    Decompression and compressed air to start.

    Phil Berkowitz
     
  18. SeldomShoots

    SeldomShoots Active Member

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    Wolfram, shouldn't an oil change would cost nothing on this engine. Afterall it is a 2 stroke, and the lubrication is in the fuel. I saw one of these in operation on you tube and mechanics can step into the bottom of the engine to inspect the crank, and bearings, and they weren't stepping in any oil. I wonder though if there are any grease, or lubrication points on it anywhere.
     
  19. patrick Swartz

    patrick Swartz Member

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    Dear Sir,

    I would love to see the machinery that they machined those pieces on. The machine is probably twice a large as the part it is machining.

    Thanks for the pictures. They are jaw dropping,in the least.

    Patrick Swartz
     
  20. 7mag

    7mag Well-Known Member

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    Yeah the engines are amazing but the machines it would take to build these. I can't even amagine. From the cast it would take to get a chunk of iron that big to the machine that you'd chuck that iron into and turn that chunk of iron to cut & shape to exacting tolerances. Simply mind boggling.
     
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