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OT Televisions

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Rick (Pa), Aug 17, 2007.

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  1. Rick (Pa)

    Rick (Pa) TS Member

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    My Television that I had for 15 years just quit. I have to purchase a new one.
    any recomendations on what to buy & what to stay away from. Thank you Rick
     
  2. mixer

    mixer Well-Known Member

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    Standard CRT tv's are on the way out. Look at the new flat panel LCD units with 1080i resolution. The 40"+ units are great. Samsung is very highly rated. Goto your local Best Buy, Circuit City, etc and see them side by side. Be prepared to spend some serious money though.


    Eric
     
  3. LWLarson

    LWLarson Member

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    How big of a screen to you want? We went plasma and like it alot, but it is rather big.... I would have looked at LCD if it weren't so big...

    My bro in law bought the DLP, and it has a great picture as well....

    One thing never presented to me was that the plasma takes markedly more power than the other technologies...

    LWL
     
  4. Rick (Pa)

    Rick (Pa) TS Member

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    Thank you both for thr quick reply's. I will go shopping saturday. Rick
     
  5. DeadDuck13

    DeadDuck13 TS Member

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    You came to the right place....I used to (as of a year ago) work in a Warehouse for Circuit City. I saw everything that went out, and most importantly everything that came BACK. I also delivered TV's, and set them up.

    CRT TV's are starting to be phased out, however there are some very good models out there. In CRT's you can't go wrong with Sony, or Panasonic. They were returned the least out of all CRT TV's we sold. Magnavox, GE, Samsung, Apex, ESA, RCA and Phillips were returned regularly.

    Large projection TV's (not including LCD projections) are quickly becoming a thing of the past. However, there are still a lot of people buying Hitachi's and Sony's. All other brands were returned regularly.

    True LCD's are light, and take up less room. However, they only go up to 40", anything above 40" (someone might make one slightly bigger now) will be an LCD projection. Either way, Panasonic, Sony, LG, and Hitachi are sure bets. Anything else is hit or miss.

    Plasmas were thought to be the wave of the future, however there is word that new technology is on the way that is better then plasmas. Plasmas also need a high def. hook up in order to get any kind of decent picture quality. In plasmas go with either a Panasonic, Sony, or Hitachi. Anything else is hit or miss....especially when you get into the cheaper brands.

    A couple of tips on buying TV's.

    You get what you pay for. Sure, that cheap TV looks ok, and for the price you can't go wrong, right? Wrong. I've seen people replace their TV every six months or so because they bought the cheapest thing they could find. Had they spent the few extra dollars, they could have gotten something that would have lasted for years.

    Always look into buying the extra warranty. Most people don't, but in reality it is sometimes the best way to go. Manufacturers of LCD projections don't cover the bulbs in thier warranty, however the store's policy does. The bulbs aren't cheap, and replacing just one bulb will cover the cost of the warranty. Plus it's nice to know that in 4 years if your TV goes out, the store will more then likely give you a new one with newer technology, rather then try to repair your bad one.

    If you're aiming high and wanting a big TV, DON'T spend all of your allowance on the TV. Buy a TV that's a little bit smaller, then buy the components that give it that extra kick (surround sound, surge protection, dvd recorders, etc). A good TV combined with a good surround sound system WILL make your trap scores go down, as you will probably spend a little more time indoors.

    On a side note, the best time to buy a TV is right after the Superbowl. Why? Stores like Circuit City & Best Buy have a 30 day - no questions asked policy. People buy the best TV they can find, have a huge Superbowl party, then return the TV just before the 30 days are up. The TV is perfectly fine, but we heard all kinds of excuses as to why they're returning it. "My wife hates it." "It doesn't look right in the room." "It's the wrong color." The TV is fine, they just wanted to "rent" one for a few days to impress people. The stores then sell them as "Open Box" items...meaning slightly used/display items. They get so many retured that they have to sell them as cheap as possible just to make room.

    Rob
     
  6. GordonWood421

    GordonWood421 TS Member

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    My investigations tend to differ from Rob's and other's information .As I understand :

    The place to start is in the room where you plan to watch the telly . There is a general rule of thumb that will give you the "best" size for that location .You can find it on Sony's web-site --- I think . If you get too large a set for the distance at which you'll be viewing , you'll see "too much" of the interfaces between images . If you go smaller , you'll just miss a bit .

    The "push" about 6 months ago was that Plasma is on the way out 'cause 720p was the best resolution that could be attained and that plasmas can "burn in" if left on "fixed images" . Panasonic was(is ?) offering a 5 year warranty a couple of months back and I see that there is 1080p resolution on some recently advertised plasmas .

    720p , 1080i , 1080p ???? "i" signifies "interlaced" --- sorta like holding the fingers of your two hands together so that the fingers are alternately "laced" ;
    alternate "lines" are "laid" on one sweep and then the "inter" line is laid on the next sweep . "p" signifies "progressive" sweeping that lays the sweep from top to bottom --- eer , or ,uh , bottom to top without the skip .So in reality a 1080i is sorta like a 540p .

    A 720p will have "about" 720 "lines" in the same space that a 1080p will have 1080 lines . So the "definition" of the image will be appropriately "better" or "not quite as good" .

    Image quality will depend upon the "signals" you'll be receiving , be sure and check to see if you'll be getting 720p (about as good as is available from satilite in my area) or better - - - or worse . Getting a 1080p for viewing 720p signals will be more than currently needed for commercial HDTV but will allow better viewing of DVDs etc that are available in "sharper" imaging .

    Something must be "afoot" as Sony 40" 1080p S3000 (or something like that) had been about $2K from Circuit City until a week or so ago --- I understand that price has dropped about $400 and if you sign-up for DirectTV , you can get another $300 off . $1300 for a (N)TOL 40" 1080p Sony sounds awfully good .

    AND , similar savings are available on other sets ( why are they called a "set" when there is only one ?) of a bunch of sizes and shapes .

    If anyone has better info , I'd appreciate their input , too . The technology is changeing so radidly we need each others help .

    Charlie
     
  7. cableguy

    cableguy TS Member

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    I have a 50 inch Sony DLP. I love it. I got it from Costco. Be sure to check them out.
    My boss tells me that the next generation of televisions will have a 'return' capability. Meaning that among other things, they will have internet ability. Also pay per view. Make your selection based on your needs, and your provider's present and future capabilities.

    Good luck,

    Shawn
     
  8. TOOT

    TOOT TS Member

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    Caution.....there is a difference between getting opinons about brands and performance...and taking technical advice from a shooting website. You wouldn't ask gun advice from the guy at Circuit City would you?

    For instance....."1080i is the same as 540p"....absurd.
    Interlaced means that every other line of information on your screen is "duplicated" from the previous line...it is still at 1080 resolution NOT 540!

    Also currently the ONLY source for 1080p material, is if you have a High Definition DVD player (anf high definition dvd's not std. one's). It will be some time yet before the technology is available to broadcast 1080p on either cable or dish...there isn't enough bandwith for that much information....
     
  9. jnoemanh

    jnoemanh TS Member

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    We recently decided to go with one more CRT while the flat screen market settles down. 26" Panasonic, $300. Great set.
     
  10. blizzard

    blizzard Active Member

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    Got a 46" Samsung DLP. Couldn't be happier. 1080i
     
  11. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    Toot, I don't think you are quite right there.

    Interlaced scanning means that the trace goes down on line no's 1,3,5,7,etc and then goes back to the top and starts over with 2,4,6,8,etc. With CRT sets it works fine because the phosphor on the tube glows for a nanosecond or so after the trace moves on.

    The split second when one trace is finished at the bottome and is returning to the top to start over is called the "vertical blanking interval". this is the time in which the satellite sends down other services. Like subscription background music, stock market quotes, etc.

    On CRT sets, I sold 400 or so Panasonics to a school system here, and there was one bad board and one set with hidden damage from being dropped somewhere in transit. I thought that was pretty good.

    HM
     
  12. TOOT

    TOOT TS Member

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    Ah, yes Grasshopper...but where is the information coming from that it is scanning in those alternate lines? Is it new or is it "fabricated" from the previous (old) information? Oh and by the way keep in mind, there are NO sources for progressive scan technology (read tv picture here) other that the HD and Blu-ray dvd's....and even though ALL HD cameras are progressive no live events, such as footabll are broadcast in progressive scan either.

    Before I get in too deep....I was trying to make a point about doing the appropriate reserach from expert sources....not that I know all about it. My information comes from reading technical sources and I may have misunderstood!!
     
  13. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    Progressive scan came from the need required by computer monitors.

    Interlace is strictly a CRT method, and HDTv uses a "de-interlace" circuit to paint the whole screen in one shot.

    NO, it's not fabricated. It's just the way the image orthicon tubes worked. chip cameras are another story. Before digital technology revolutionized video transmission, there was not enough bandwidth in a 6Mhz wide TV channel to paint a whole screen in one shot. Link for you, the first half is applicable, the rest I didn't bother with.

    My work was primarily with RF and cable installations, HD came later. Still not used in all but the newest school systems because of equipment cost. I think you might see more use of fiber and digital technology but the medium is tied to broadcast standards and basic analog information for now.

    FCC is notorius for clinging to the old methods. The meltdown in electronics is still proceding at a breakneck pace (equipment gets better and cheaper), but taxpayers won't usually hold still for complete replacement every 4 years or so.

    Another PITA is the occasional competition between technologies before standardisation. VHS was not as good as Beta, but VHS won. Woe to my pal with his large Beta library.

    Sorry for going off topic. I get all the TV I want from 8 regular old CRT sets. Just my life style. If I had a High Def in the loading room I might make a mistake when some hottie was on screen.

    HM
     
  14. ramorton

    ramorton TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Rick, I bought a Sharp Aquos 52" Hi-Def 1080p from buydig.com out of New Jersey. No shipping and no tax. T.V. arrived when they said it would with extra heavy shipping box. Picture is absolutely clear as a bell particularly on HD channels. Could not be happier. I also, had a 27" for 16 to 17 yrs. This is completely different. You cannot go wrong with buydig.com. Several friends have purchased from them with the same results. Hope this helps, Roy
     
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