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OT: Surefire flashlights

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by FIB, Jun 24, 2008.

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  1. FIB

    FIB Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    Location:
    N. IL
    I recently bought a surefire flashlight and was wondering if any of you have had this experience with them. While taking a night hike w/my sons boy scout troop last Saturday night my surefire flashlight went dead. The light didn't dim to give me any warning it just went out. Is this normal? I like the bright light and I understand the "run" time is only about 1 hr. per set of batteries but I don't like the instant light out w/o any warning...Randy
     
  2. sixten38

    sixten38 Member

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    Mar 16, 2008
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    208
    Were you using quality batteries in it? My experience with off brand batteries has been poor, greatly reduced use time. The surefire branded batteries have always given best results, although I have not tried other name brand CR123 batts. I saw a Surefire wanna be flashlight at the Raliegh gun and knife shoe over the weekend called an Olight, LED type light. Less expensive than a Surefire with a bunch of features such as variable brightness strobe etc. Cost 20%-30% less than a Surefire.
     
  3. noknock1

    noknock1 Active Member

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    Stranger in a Strange Land
    Hey Randy,

    It is normal with certain batteries, I have used Surefires and Streamlights for years now both rechargeable and the ones that use the CR123A throw aways. All batteries have plus and cons as the web link shows.

    You might consider a Surefire or other comparable brand that is an led and has different power settings to maximize battery use. Or if you don't want to spend that much money on another "performance" flashlight, then you can do what myself and a lot of other guys do and that is have a second $10.00 el cheapo led flashlight that runs on double A batteries.

    Use the bright one when really needed and use the cheap led for normal taskings like looking for stuff in the tent at night or changing fishing tackle, etc. In addition to the $10.00 cheap L.E.D. flashlight, when camping, fishing at night, etc. I use an LED headlamp to keep both hands free, especially nice when you are field dressing a deer and end up losing the sunlight.

    You can find them cheap enough at Chinamart or Gander Mountain, Bass Pro type stores.

    Also those surefires are so bright that I have not been overly impressed with the longevity of their bulbs, take a spare and keep with you.
     
  4. DTrykow

    DTrykow Active Member

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    1,542
    Nice concept very bright, but very expensive. Batteries don't last, are expensive and there not a common battery. Ditto on the bulbs. Dave T.
     
  5. Phil E

    Phil E TS Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    390
    The Surefire is perfect for what it does - blinding disabling bright light for short periods. Used this way, the batteries last a very long time. I always use Surefire brand batteries. I agree with Noknock that lightweight inexpensive lights are great for hiking. My favorites have an intermittant button or rocker thumb-switch. The way we always have done it is, on for 1/2 second or so, then off for 3-4. Just a quick flash to be sure you're still on the trail, you then walk a ways in the mind's memory of the trail ahead, without night blindness. Same in camp, flashes rather than steady-on. Replace the bulb with a lower-wattage one, all you need is a faint light. Batteries & bulbs last nearly forever this way. Duracel used to make (maybe still does) a flat lightweight AA flashlight called the Durabeam that was perfect for trails and glaciers. It has a sliding intermittant thumb switch. I still use one that's 30 years old. Phil E
     
  6. MTA Tom

    MTA Tom Active Member

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    1,301
    Surefire makes quality products (I own three of them). However, the Fenix L1D CE with six output types/levels, including strobe, and a ninety lumen maximum output is the best and most practical EDC light on the market. It uses one standard AA battery.
     
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