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OT Smoker recipies

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Zoltan, Oct 17, 2011.

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  1. Zoltan

    Zoltan Member

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    I just purchased a Bradley electric 4 tray digital smoker. If you have any good smoker recipes I would like to here about them. I would like to try brisket as my first offering to friends and neighbors followed by turkey and ham for Thanksgiving.

    Would like to get recipies for rubs and what types of wood chips you use with the different types of meats.

    Thanks

    Roger Edgington
     
  2. shooterIII

    shooterIII Member

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    I use Mesquite for all wild game.
     
  3. whiz-bang

    whiz-bang Active Member

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    If you smoke a brisket try the full packer. This way you will be able to make burnt ends with the point. I have used a lot of commercial rubs but I always go back to a roughly 50/50 mixture of sea salt or kosher salt and black pepper. Then tune it up to your taste.

    Make sure you get your brisket up to 195 internal temp. and pull from smoker. Or wrap in tin foil at around 165 and pull at 195.

    I like to use cheery wood with some hickory or apple. I have a lot of it and is common in my area. Do not soak your wood.

    You may want to check in over at the smoke ring all your questions will be answered there.
     
  4. dsid01

    dsid01 TS Member

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    I would not try brisket as your first experiment, if your planning on having guests over. I have found that it is not as easy to do as a pork shoulder. I have done several of each and the pork shoulder is by far my favorite. I do a whole bone in pork shoulder, rub it with whatever you like I use garlic powder , onion powder, paprika, salt and pepper, and brown sugar. Put the rub on the night before and refrigerate until morning, pull it out of the fridge an hour before you are going to start it, to let it come to room temp. I usually run mine for twelve hours, no basting or anything and don't open it more than you have to. It will come out incredible. Good luck!
     
  5. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Google 'Moore County Dry Rub' for a great smoker rub. This recipie can also be found in the Jack Daniels cook book. I prefer the rubs over marinades as they tend to add a lot of flavor without overpowering the natural taste of the meat. Also they are a lot easier to prep than a marinade or sop.

    For wood, I like mountain Mahogany or Mesquite with a few Hickory chips. Oak and hickory works good too. A lot of folks like wood from fruit trees because of the sweet taste they impart.

    Avoid using too much salt in the rub as that tends to pull a lot of moisture out of the meat - that is a good thing if you are trying to make jery but not so good on roasts.

    Most of all have fun experimenting. Whole chickens are good for experimenting as they are low cost and even if it doesn't come out the way you want they can still make decent chicken salad sandwiches.
     
  6. kgp912kgp

    kgp912kgp Active Member

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    RIBS

    Pull off the membrane on the inside of the bone side of the ribs.

    Rub down with a light coat of mustard and sprinkle on Mcormicks pork rub.

    sprinkle Dark Brown sugar on both sides of the ribs. (I Coat it heavly) the sugar will drip off while they are cooking so go thick.

    Smoke for 4 to 5 to 6 hours depending on the thickness. Add BBQ sauce to taste after cooking.

    these are the best ribs I have ever had I don't do the BBQ sauce as they taste great. They are great for a group dinner or just the 2 of you!!!
     
  7. leadhead358

    leadhead358 Member

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    I never believed it, but I tried it and now I am hooked. People will tell you not to do it, but you can't beat the flavor. Brine your pork butts (shoulder) and your brisket before smoking them. I do large quantities so you will cut down for 1 butt or brisket. I use gallon soy sauce, cup sugar, cup pickling salt and one cup brown sugar, 3 gallons water and a bag of ice to cool down mixture. Put first five in pot and bring to boil make sure all is dissolved then add ice to cool quickly.

    Trim up your meat and poke holes all the way through the meat put in container and cover with brine in fridge for TWO DAYS making sure the meat is covered with the brine solution.

    Pull out of brine solution, rinse off and pat dry. Give a light coating of yellow mustard to hold the rub on tight. Add dry rub consisting of a coating with lowery's salt, (light) on course black pepper, smoked paprika, powdered onion and powdered garlic and make sure to rub it in the meat..

    All smokers cook differently on times, but I cook mine at 225 until done, about 12-14 hours in my meadow creek smoker, I do not wrap them. I also use hickory or wild apple I cut up.

    And no the meat is not salty because of all the soy and you will not taste the mustard. The soy really brings out the taste of the meat. I did 20 (8) lb butts two weeks ago in my smoker mmmmmm good
     
  8. vmthtr in green bay

    vmthtr in green bay Member

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    I just did a corned beef brisket and the guys were fighting over the left overs. Used Mesquite wood, cooked on 225-250 until internal temp was 180. I used the rub recipe from "smoking meat" web site. I did 2 hours in smoke, 2 hours wrapped with apple juice and 2 hours unwrapped. Was very tender and VERY good. Also, I would highly recommend the remote thermometer. I can sit at the computer or wherever and still see what meat temp is. Wish my smoker had a temp setting instead of HI-MED-LOW dial.
     
  9. vmthtr in green bay

    vmthtr in green bay Member

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    I also have a couple recipices for smoked salmon and lake trout if you want them. As well as a great salmon spread for crackers.
     
  10. tgs1420

    tgs1420 TS Member

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    http://virtualweberbullet.com/index.html
     
  11. postmastertim

    postmastertim Wheels are falling off.... TS Supporters

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    Give the attached link a try. Some true insight into smoking meat.
     
  12. hrosik123

    hrosik123 Member

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    Don't be afraid to do briskett. Dry rub for at least 12 hours. Bring meat to room temp before you put it in the Bradley. (I have a Bradley myself.) Set the temp for 225 and smoke for about 1hr per pound. Take advantage of the smoke and do some other things while its burning. Look on ebay for good deals on biskets. Lots of wood to choose from. Eventually you will smoke things you never thought of. I know that didn't sound right but were talking about cooking guys.
     
  13. mette56

    mette56 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Camdenton, MO
    Papa Sam's Texas Rub:

    1 part sea salt

    1 part fine black pepper

    1 part course black pepper

    1 part fine red pepper or cayanne (not powder)

    1 part garlic powder-granulated-not powder

    1 part chili powder

    To mix well, no ingredients should be powdered. All should be granulated. No flaked red pepper! For ribs, use above rub but add 1 part brown sugar. After rub is applied, we top with Montreal Steak Seasoning for a crunchy top (bark).

    Above rotisserie smoker is at a benefit "Meat at the Mansion" to benefit the Mansion, an historic site. This smoker holds 32 whole 20# briskets at once for this annual event and because of convection, has them ready in 8 hours with no wrapping in foil. Smoker will actually hold 64 whole briskets if I double the shelves from 8 to 16. Has a full length 8' firebox double insulated with concrete bottom. This unit fed the entire 891st and their families on three occasions upon returning from Iraq and Afganistan. Plus benefits for Blue Star Mothers, ACS, churches and any good cause.

    Get yourself a good electronic temp guage. Cook briskets to 195 to 200 degrees internal temp. and it will fall through your fork. Pork Butt (pulled pork) PULLS at 205 degrees internal temp...not before. Some say not to use temp guages, but for every degree past what is required, you lose moisture. Cook chicken to 165...no more! Ribs to 185-190 or until they start to break apart when lifted with spatula. PM me if you want more advice. Good luck!

    milt
    [​IMG]
     
  14. BigBadBob

    BigBadBob TS Member

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    I have a Brinkmann charcoal smoker and here are a few of my favorite recipes from the smoker. HICKORY is the only wood I use. ( personal preference)

    Pork roast- I usually don't rub too heavily as I want the true pork flavor. The meat goes on the rack over medium high heat. I smoke all my pork roast, depending on size of course, at least 6 hours. In the drip pan I season the water with a couple of bay leaves, dried Tarragon and apple slices. About half way through the smoking process I add a bag of sauerkraut to the drip pan. I also baste the meat every hour with liquid from the drip pan. Serve with roasted potatoes from the grill (or put them in the drip pan to cook with the kraut) and the kraut from the drip pan.

    Rainbow trout- leave head and skin on trout. Place lemon wedge in cavity. Wrap trout with good slab-sliced bacon. smoke at least 3 hours over medium to high heat. Serve with wild rice and grilled veggies. spicy mustard is good as tartar sauce.

    Cheese is also very easy to smoke. I use small disposable aluminum loaf pans. Chunk up your favorite cheese and put in loaf pan uncovered. The cheese will melt and as it smokes will get a little brown color to the top. Different cheese take the smoke differently, so depending on the amount of smoke flavor you like, experiment with time in the smoker. Take out the pans and let the cheese harden back up. The cheddars and white cheeses will pop right out of the pans. Velveeta is unbelievable from the smoker, try it!

    Whole chicken or Cornish Game hens- Place whole or pieces of onion in the cavity and rub birds with your favorite rub. place on rack and medium to high heat and smoke at least 3 hours. Again I season the drip pan with Bay leaves, tarragon and a quart of chicken broth. I add potatoes and onions to drip pan about half-way through the cooking process.
     
  15. grnberetcj

    grnberetcj Active Member

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    Personally...I like a non filtered Camel and a Budweiser.....more fun than eating.

    Ah, those were the days...

    Curt
     
  16. Oscar Ray

    Oscar Ray TS Member

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    Curt,

    You were probably sitting with your feet up on a sand bag outside your bunker and enjoying not being shot at, thats why it was so good! LOL

    Oscar
     
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