1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

OT - Plant I.D. ?

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by JDSENIOR, Sep 6, 2010.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. JDSENIOR

    JDSENIOR Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2006
    Messages:
    56
    Location:
    Central Illinois
    Can anyone identify this flowering plant. It popped up in our back yard about 4 weeks ago and I'd like to know how to care and transplant. Thanks, JD
    jdsenior_2008_03031.jpg

    jdsenior_2008_03034.jpg

    jdsenior_2008_03037.jpg
     
  2. crusha

    crusha TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    5,762
    Wild Indigo...Baptisia Tinctoria...this is the wild yellow cousin to the purple "Baptisia Australis" you see for sale in nurseries. It's a perennial in the pea family. If you want to transplant it, better do it soon...it forms a deep tap-root and is said to be quite difficult to transplant after it's established (I've never tried it).


    I actually like this plant a lot. It requires no care at all, because it fixes its own Nitrogen and can live in very poor soil. If you leave it in one place for several years, it forms a large colony that looks like a big bush on top with a cluster of straight stems on the bottom. Very distinctive, and looks neat during the winter when the dark pea-pods stay on it. People with perfectly-manicured lawns won't like it, but if you like wild natural looking stuff that's interesting, this is a very cool plant. You will get a lot of questions about it.


    And Tron...keep your smartass comments to yourself!
     
  3. Grayson Mayne

    Grayson Mayne Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    357
    JD SENIOR Roundup ought to do it. If that dosen't work try two four d.

    Sorry couldn't help myself.

    Buzz Gun you seem very knowledgeable with respect to plants. If I send you a few plant pictures would you attempt to ID them for me? (no spoof)
     
  4. crusha

    crusha TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    5,762
    Grayson,

    Love to. (This is my faggy side coming out). Now if you'll excuse me, I'm going to go pop a cat with my Glock .40
     
  5. rocktire

    rocktire Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2008
    Messages:
    218
    I think you have mistaken wild indigo.

    It is definately Sicklepod
    I agree with the 2,4-D

    http://www.ppws.vt.edu/scott/weed_id/casob.htm

    http://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/prairie/plantx/sicklepodx.htm
     
  6. crusha

    crusha TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    5,762
    Bloom structure and coloration are wrong for it to be sicklepod?
     
  7. rocktire

    rocktire Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2008
    Messages:
    218
    Look at the web sites that I posted. Definately sicklepod. Have dealt with the stuff for years. It will put on a long skinny pod. It is in fact a legume though as you said and very similar to wild indigo.

    Sicklepod
    Senna obtusifolia
    Caesalpinia family (Caesalpiniaceae)

    Description: This annual native plant is 1-2½' tall, branching occasionally. The stems are light green and somewhat ridged. The lower stems often sprawl along the ground in open areas, otherwise this plant is erect. The compound leaves alternate along the stems. They are evenly pinnate, usually with 3 pairs of leaflets, and have long leaf stems (primary petioles). The obovate leaflets are individually 1½" long and 1" across. They are devoid of hairs, and are light green on the underside. There is an extra-floral nectary close to the lowest pair of leaflets on the upper side of each compound leaf. This nectary resembles a small brown spike. The foliage has a slightly rank odor.
     
  8. crusha

    crusha TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    5,762
    Well, I'm willing to stand corrected...that picture looks like what he has. But I looked up sicklepod in the Aububon wildflower directory, and it shows an entirely different bloom with white and brown in it. This may be where we get into common name confusion.


    JD, spray the damn thing and forget it (just kidding). And Grayson, send your pics to the guy above, he's obviously the expert!
     
  9. rocktire

    rocktire Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2008
    Messages:
    218
    I have ran across a lot of interesting plants (weeds) in my profession. I love to ID plants. Sometimes you have to look in multiple books to find a correct specimen. I have had to send weeds to university weed scientists before because they appear to be "mutants". I wasn't intending to sound like a pro or a jerk. Anyway thanks for the interesting post. By the way sicklepd can actually look like a tasty treat but don't eat it, I have heard that they are mildly poisonous. Pull it and it will most likely die save your money on spray unless you have some handy.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.