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*OT* Painting an Old Wood Shed *OT*

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Recoil Sissy, May 14, 2008.

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  1. Recoil Sissy

    Recoil Sissy Well-Known Member

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    I need to prep and paint an old wood shed. I'm hoping for some good advice/ideas.

    I believe the siding is redwood. It is old but in good shape. The age of the shed would suggest original paint was probably oil based with lead. However, much of old paint has peeled away leaving a great deal of bare wood. What little paint is left, will need to be removed. I'm thinking about renting a high pressure spayer to very carefully knock it off.

    If I successfuly remove most of the remaining paint, I'm guessing quality latex is the way to go. Is it? What do I use for primer? Will one good coat do it? What do I use for the final white top coat?

    And... what recommendations change if I'm not as successful removing the remaining old paint as I hope?

    sissy
     
  2. FPBristol

    FPBristol TS Member

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    Clean using a pressure washer and scrape all loose flakes off after the building dries. Two options: You can just stain the building with a solid color stain like the Sherwin Williams Woodscapes (two coats are best), or you can prime with Sherwin Williams A-100 Latex House Primer and topcoat with a good quality Latex such as the Sherwin Williams Duration, Reliance, Superpaint or A-100 Housepaint. Two coats of everything except the Duration. Although it is preferable to remove all the old paint it is not necessary if the paint remaining is tightly attached. If it is old lead based paint on there now you will need to spread plastic to catch any loose paint chips to dispose of as a solid waste. If you will visit your nearest Sherwin Williams store they will help you get the job done properly and if you have any questions for me I will be glad to help. I'm a 25 plus years Professional Coatings Rep for Sherwin Wiliams and have some idea of what I'm talking about Businesss phone if you want to talk. 828-768-0251. Finley.
     
  3. Ahab

    Ahab Well-Known Member

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    After 41 years in the sign business...I agree with Finley!
     
  4. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I've never painted a woodshed, but I've been taken to the woodshed to have my wagon painted.
     
  5. maclellan1911

    maclellan1911 TS Member

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    I secound Finley, I painted my house with the duration, and primer.
     
  6. Pull & Mark

    Pull & Mark Well-Known Member

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    I say don't use pressure washer!!! Use T.S.P. spray on and let sit for a hour or so, and do use a brush on handle and scrub a bit. Rinse off with reg. hose and use OIL Base paint when fully dry. Two coats are best but if heavy, one is good. Oil paint will hold mildue after time outside so be sure to use a good Latex paint for the last coat. Do try to scrap off any old paint but OK if not all comes off as said above. Oil Primer will bond well. I say Use Benjamin Moore Paints. All paints basicly come in 3 grades. Good, better, best. You get what you pay for. Good Luck and Break-em all. Jeff
     
  7. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Pressure washers are OK if you use some common sense with them. Like using the broadest spray head and standing back. If your intention is to blow off old paint, instead of cleaning, you probably should be doing it by hand. However, there are pressure washer attachments for safely washing cars. You might look into those.
     
  8. FPBristol

    FPBristol TS Member

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    It is true that a pressure washer will damage your substrate if improperly used. If you are renting a unit see if they hve a rotating tip that gives you the benefit of high pressure with less chance of damaging the substrate. Even then, use caution. It is no longer necessary to use oil based primers as they have been surpassed in performance for several years now. All the research and development has been in the waterbased acrylic/polymer coatings for the past twenty years or so. Do not be misled by the ratings of Consumer Reports. They do have their limitations and refuse to give anyone the standards they rate house coatings by. This has resulted in questionable at best evaluations. Duration is the finest coating ever produced for house painting and carries a lifetime guarantee against failure when properly applied. It will fade, but the protection for your house lasts a lifetime.
     
  9. noknock1

    noknock1 Active Member

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    I am one of the mislead ones as I have had better luck with oil based paints for outdoor applications. 7 1/2 or 8? LOL
     
  10. Recoil Sissy

    Recoil Sissy Well-Known Member

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    Gentlemen:

    Thanks for the input and opinions. They are very much appreciated!

    sissy
     
  11. RogerNRA

    RogerNRA TS Member

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    Sissy, one more option. BURN THAT SUCKER TO THE GROUND, build a new one. It will be much eaiser to paint..............Roger
     
  12. FPBristol

    FPBristol TS Member

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    2str8. I have been personally involved in the testing of exterior latex primers. I can assure you that in practically all applications the latex primers will out perform the oil based primers on most common substrates. In particular I worked with an outdoor advertising company that has been doing billboards for decades that continually had to re-do the exterior plywood and trim of their billboards about every 2-3 years. A major expense as you might imagine. Several years ago we made a switch to the then new Sherwin Williams A-100 Latex Primer as a test and the results were amazing even to me. The life of the billboards has been more than doubled and in fact many of them have never had to be reprimed since then. Unfortunately for me sales to that account declined, but for the customer it is a good thing. Some exotic woods do better with oil based primers, but they still don't do really well. Nature of the beast of extremely dense exotic woods. Many cannot be coated with anything except a reduced semi-transparent oil stain. Protection factor is minimal and short lived. Our exterior products are no longer graded by a decade. Our most economical coating has an 18 year warranty and the most sophisticated carries a lifetime warranty. These are warranties that specify latex based primers. Hard for ole-timers like me to accept, but the latex primers do in fact perform very well.
     
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