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OT: Opinions of Rem. Model 760 or 7600

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by FIB, Jan 2, 2008.

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  1. FIB

    FIB Member

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    I'm considering buying my RH son (I'm a lefty) a used Rem. Model 760 or 7600 in a deer hunting caliber (.270 or.30-06). I shoot a LH Ruger Model 77 but want to get him something that if he changes his mind about hunting I can use (hope that makes sense). What are the differences btwn the two models and what should I be on the look out for when purchasing a used one? Also any opinions appreciated. Thanks...Randy
     
  2. cole-mitchell

    cole-mitchell TS Member

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    I killed my first deer with an early 70's 760 in .30-06 and if both of you were wanting to shoot it the pump action would be ideal. Yet I wouldn't say my 760 is all that accurate, it puts 5 shot 5 inch groups at 100 yards, then again, it is an old field rifle.
     
  3. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Accuracy with these guns varies widely. Some are tack drivers, many are merely OK.

    A friend had a 30-06 that was a tack driver. It was uncanny.
     
  4. FIB

    FIB Member

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    Thank guys for your imput. Can anyone tell me what the differences are btwn the 760 and the 7600?? Thanks...Randy
     
  5. miketmx

    miketmx Well-Known Member

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    I gave my 760 in 30-06 to my son-in-law and he got a nice elk with it this season in his first big game hunt, boy was he happy. I would like to know if a Remington synthetic stock and forend for a 7600 would fit on a 760 ??
     
  6. Furfaced

    Furfaced TS Member

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    Randy - over the years I have owned a few 760's and found them to be great rifles. Most of mine were either 30-06 or 308's. Each one would hold a great group from benchrest and I consider them to be one of the best and affordable hunting rifles for new and old shooters. They are also great for a quick second shot. One word or caution, if you find one in the carbine version, beware of the recoil and muzzle blast. The carbine version is very handy in the field but a bit of a thumper. The 7600 is the later version of the 760 but I am not sure of what any difference may be. Good luck.

    Roger
     
  7. trapat

    trapat TS Member

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    Randy,

    I have two model 760 rifles that I would consider selling. One older one, probably form the 50s and one I bought new in 1976. Both are 3006 and both are accurate. email me direct if you have an interest. Both are scoped as well.

    Pat Christopher
     
  8. lumper

    lumper TS Member

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    http://www.remington.com/library/history/firearm_models/centerfire/model_760.asp

    http://www.remington.com/library/history/firearm_models/centerfire/model_7600.asp

    The fist above link is some information about the 760 and the second link is information about the 7600. The big difference between the 2 was the 760 was produced between 1952 and 1981 and the 7600 began production in 1981 to present day. They are both slide/pump action rifles and personally I would tend to stay away from them. I have never owned one and have never shot them but I have never really heard anything good about them. It has been mentioned above that some are tack drivers which I have heard but I have heard that even the best of them are about par with a Marlin lever action 30/30 which is no more than a 75yd brush gun. I have also heard of numerous cycling problems due to dirt and grime and that particular model of gun needing a cleaning after each outing to be sure there is no grime in the action that could cause a problem on your next days hunt. Granted you will always hear more good than bad but I have heard far more negative things about not only Remingtons slide/pump action rifles but also about theres and other manufactures of both pump/slide action and semi-auto large caliber rifles.

    Do yourself a favor and get a good basic Remington or any good manufacture bolt action rifle ... your son and you will be much happier for many years to come.
     
  9. Jim101

    Jim101 Active Member

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    The big difference is the bolts. The 7600 has fewer lugs, But they are much larger, Less prone to problems with dirt. I have a 7600 in 270 win and it is almost a tack driver. Groups about 1 1/2 inches at a 100 yds.




    Jim
     
  10. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    BTW, the accurate one I mentioned was a 30-06 with, if I recall right, a 6x scope, and a 10 round after market magazine. It was accurate enough that my friend used it as his "politically correct" patrol rifle in his police cruiser.
     
  11. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    As one who performed Warranty Service and Repair for Remington, I must say that the pump (760, 7600) and especially the auto rifle (740, 742, 7400) are NOT the best guns Remington has ever made. (understatement)

    Without going into details, I will second the fellow that suggested the bolt gun. Why not get another Ruger? A truly classic design, and comes with rings! In my never to be humble opinion, the 1898 type action with claw extractor and fixed ejector is the Acme in turnbolt rifle design. The Ruger's three position safety allows the firearm to be loaded and unloaded while on safe, and also to lock the bolt.

    The 260 or 7/08 Remington rounds are both winners, especially with young and petite shooters. All the grief is on the front end of the gun. These are very easy on the shooter.

    The 260 will be my next caliber when I finally break down and buy a non military caliber. It will be the All Weather Ruger. I have been stuck on the 223, 308 and 30/06 for a long time.
     
  12. rjdden

    rjdden TS Member

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    I have had two 742's in my lifetime and had very good shots with both. One was a Carbine and the other was the Standard with the longer barrel. Both were 30-06's Got a Moose in Canada with the Carbine and several Buck white tails while I owned it. With the Standard got several Bucks and one Elk throught the years here in Az. 7 to be exact, with 3 of them of being Mulies and of course 1 Elk. Both guns grouped pretty much the same within 3 1/2 inches in a 5 shot pattern at 200 yards. Give or take 1/4 inch each way. I had the Carbine for about 5 years and the same for the Standard. The Carbine did have a little more kick than the Standard but the differences were not that much. I also am now looking at the 7600 and the 7400. I have shot both at one time or another. I prefer the Semi Autos because of being left handed.There have been roumers of problems with lefty ejecting semi autos. This is not just Remingtons problem, this is all the makers of semi autos for lefties. Seems as though they don't want to eject out the left side properly for some reason. Rich.(inPeoria,A.Z.)
     
  13. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    If one MUST have an autoloading game rifle, the Browning is hard to beat.
     
  14. IM390

    IM390 Member

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    Had a 7600 for 1 (one) year. Could not ever get it to handle reloads(no matter how they were sized). Factory ammo worked just fine. Chamber didn't want to close completely. Gunsmith said he could fix it for $200 but traded it in for a Remington 700 Classic also in .30-06. I've had the Classic ever since.
     
  15. kallen

    kallen TS Member

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    I have owned and shot a lot of game animals with the 760 rem(30-06) that was bought in 1958. It is an excellent shooting rifle and easy to carry. I only have 2 complaints with them. First mine is tight chambered and drives reloaders crazy getting shells sized correctly, however factory loads work fine. The second complaint is that it is noisy when chambering a load. Because it is a light rifle it has considerable felt recoil with heavy loads.
     
  16. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    Using the Small Base Die generally takes care of this. When the gun is shot much, the chamber will enlarge and generally gain headspace. When reloading, use the FASTEST powder that will give desired ballistics. Using three tablespoons of 4350 or 4831 with heavy bullets will give you problems.

    STAY AWAY FROM "HIGH ENERGY" or "LIGHT MAGNUM" ammo in the 740 and 760 series.
     
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