1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

OT.. MOUNTAIN BIKE

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Pump4Smoke, Aug 12, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Pump4Smoke

    Pump4Smoke Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    31
    Bernie there are some nice bikes out there. They generally run in these groups; XC-cross country-general riding and racing, tend to be lighter bikes with less travel suspension. AM-all mountain (also called free ride)tend to be good all around bikes with longer travel and a little heavier. DH-downhill, lots of travel, heaviest bikes, not good general all-around bikes, they are really for going real fast downhill usually followed by long distances of being off the ground (won't catch me doing this!)

    I have an older DBR that is really light. My son rides a giant (great value) and he just took delivery of a Santa Cruz Nomad frame and rear shock, that he is going to build up. There are a lot of really good bikes out there in the 2k and up range. Look at Santa Cruz (they have a lot of different models and are about the hottest sellers out there right now), Giant, and I really like the Chumba, it is made in SoCal and they are a small operation, but the bikes are top notch. Hydro disks are really nice, Hayes, Avids, they tend to be a little squeaky on the trails due to dust on the rotors but they stop the bike even at high speeds with little effort.

    It doesn't matter what you ride as long as you have a good time doing it. Look at as many bikes as you can. Part of the choice will also depend on the LBS (local bike store) you like the best. A good one will help you get the right size, make sure it fits, and will be there to back up the product for you. Sounds like buying guns doesn't it. I just got back from a ride and stumbled across this. Good luck. George

    mtbr.com is about the best source of info out there with years of testing products, and a very large forum, that covers everything you need to know.
     
  2. krieghoffkrusher

    krieghoffkrusher TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2006
    Messages:
    298
    Bernie,
    The manufacturers you mentioned all make very nice bikes in the price range you are looking in. I used to race road and mountain bikes and also was a marketing manager for a chain of bike shops. In order to comment on the bikes you are looking at we would really need to know what type of riding you plan on doing. If you are going to primarily ride on-road then you can still get a full suspension bike but I would buy one with limited travel in the rear suspension or one that you can completely lock out the suspension on. On bikes with a lot of travel you spend a lot of you energy bouncing the bike along. I have had countless mountain bikes ranging from down hill racers to cross country racers and have ended up with a Cannonade F1000 which is a hard tail with a titanium lefty fork and I love it. The power transfer from the pedals to the rear wheel is great and the lefty fork soaks up anything I can throw at it which can be a lot.

    Even if you are planning on riding a lot of off-road I would stick to a short travel bike with maybe 2.5" of travel in the rear. This will be more than you will need and still give you decent power transfer to the rear wheels.
     
  3. jackmitch

    jackmitch TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    815
    what ever you do don't jump ramps with a mountain bike. i tried ti about 10 years ago. i don't know what went wrong but i ended up in the hospital with a completely seperated shoulder, 4 stitches in my eyebrow, and seven stitches the my left ear try to show my 13 year old sons friends how easy it was.that was 10 years ago and my shoulder still bothers me.
     
  4. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,353
    hmmmmm

    street and light trail riding? sounds more like you need a hybred-- with larger tires but 700C wheels I dont see the need for disc brakes or for a suspension system from what you describe

    and you can compare hybreds from 500 dollars- get a comfortable seat- make sure it fits you and go for it

    maybe get a suspension seat post-- maybe

    regards from Iowa

    Gene
     
  5. Pump4Smoke

    Pump4Smoke Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    31
    Just for fun, that's what it is all about right?
     
  6. Luckyman

    Luckyman Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,035
    Take a look at Kona Bicycles....The Kona has a great Dual supspension 4 bar link that is the best design out there and you can pick one of these bikes up for under a grand! I bought my Kona Kikapu for around $800.00 and love it!
     
  7. ec90t

    ec90t Guest

    The problem that I have/had with rear suspension bicycles is that they absorb too much of the energy from pedeling. I always preferred a front suspended mountain bike with a rigid rear.

    ec90t
     
  8. jimx200

    jimx200 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    623
    Bernie, for light trails you don't need a fs bike...hardtail is the way to go. I've been riding for 40 years (road/mountain) and have a Bianchi Vigorelli (road) and Specialized Stump Jumper (hardtail). I have ridden my hardtail on some serious trails (roots/rocks) here on the Sierra Nevada's and with practice you can take a hardtail pretty much anywhere a fs bike would go. A fs bike is also heavier then a hardtail and you'll really feel it when your legs are burning up a steep trail. The fs ride is plush and soft...not my preference as (like noted in the above post) it feels like too much power is lost when cranking. It's hard to find a made in USA frame...most every component is now made in Taiwan (who make excellent frames) or China. In fact, many models of Cannondale are now made offshore. A few tips on quality components to look for: Avid BB7 disc brakes, Shimano Deore,LX, or XT, and SRAM X7or X9 (USA made) for derailers/shifters. Most everyone makes a good wheelset these days, just make sure they come with a name brand hub (Shimano fan here)and are double wall with spoke eyelets for strength. Fit is the most important part of riding...mountain or road. Find a bike shop that will allow you to ride as many models as possible. From what you posted, a hardtail in the $600-$900. range should serve you well. Each brand has it's own "feel"...find what you like and hit the trails. At my age (56) getting tossed is not fun (did a semi-endo this spring and can still feel it), BUT the health rewards are fantastic (that and gym time). My favorite site for info. is www.bikeforums.net. Now is a good time to buy a discounted 07 bike as the new models are out. Most shops discount the 07's about 20%. Find a shop that will include at least 2 free tuneups and free adjustments for a year. Let us know what you find.
     
  9. Charles L. Schmidt

    Charles L. Schmidt TS Member

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2006
    Messages:
    410
    I've owned USA made Trek, Cannondale, and Gary Fischer bikes. All three are high quality bikes and are worth the money.

    I'm currently riding a Gary Fischer "Comfort Bike", which I believe is another name for a hybrid. It has suspended forks and a suspended seat post. What a pleasure to ride after riding ridged framed mountain bikes. cls
     
  10. krieghoffkrusher

    krieghoffkrusher TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2006
    Messages:
    298
    Bernie,
    Take a look at Cannondale's selection of "All-Mountain" line of bikes - The Prophet and the Rush. They come in different price ranges and you should be able to find one that suites your budget. I used to road race and was not a fan of Cannondales because they had a reputation for an extremely stiff ride. When I switched to mountain biking I road many different and very expensive bikes and have stuck with Cannondale. They are extremely well made, the frame is guaranteed for life and are American made. Many bikes even in the $2,000 price range are coming the mechanical disk brakes rather that hydraulic so be on the look out for that. The mechanical disk brakes have come along way and are very, very good but do not have the modulation control that a hydraulic is going to have. If your just fooling around off road once and awhile you will never no the difference and going with the mechanical brakes may allow you to save some money and step up into a better frame or better components elsewhere on the bike.
    One area you do not want to skimp in is derailleurs. I would stick with SRAM or Shimano XT or higher. The bike I have has all XTR with Hayes hydraulic brakes. Everything works flawlessly. Better dearailleurs directly correspond to your enjoyment of the bike.

    Hope this helps.
     
  11. jimx200

    jimx200 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    623
    Not a fan or hydro brakes...every year I see someone who has crashed and torn their hydraulic hose(s)...when that happens it's SOL. That and a big pain in the butt to ever bleed. Whatever bike you get, just ride it. It's guaranteed to help you stay/get into shape and make you feel like a kid again.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.