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OT Leaky Basement

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by blkcloud, May 13, 2010.

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  1. blkcloud

    blkcloud Active Member

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    Have any of you found anything you can paint on concrete blocks from the inside of your basement to keep them from leaking through? We had the outside tarred really good before the fill dirt was put in, also had drain pipes put around the perimiter but we still have seepage.. thanks!
     
  2. Bruce Specht

    Bruce Specht Well-Known Member

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    Waiting for answer also, as I have the same problem
     
  3. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    Probably the number one, biggest thing you can do to prevent water in-leakage, is to make sure the soil around your house slopes AWAY from the house. 4 to 1 or 3 to 1 slope if you can.

    The more slope, the better. This is absolutely essential.

    If there are any low spots near the foundation where water can "pond" try to dig a "path" so that area can drain. Worst case, if there's no convenient way to do make it drain away by cutting a path on the surface, build a french drain.

    About every 4 or 5 years, I get a cubic yard of dirt and fill in around the foundation to make sure it slopes away, because over time, that soil settles, and if it settles too much, the water wants to go back towards the foundation.

    Be careful though, you don't want the soil in contact with your siding, only in contact with the foundation. Critters like termites can get in if you build up the soil too high and have it in contact with the siding.

    And make absolutely sure your downspout splash-blocks are getting the gutter drains AWAY from the foundation, and where they drain to is sloped down and away from the foundation. If your gutters and downspouts leak near the foundation, that water is going to come right in.

    Also, if you have a sump pump, make sure the discharge is, you guessed it, well away from the house and in a location where it drains downward away from the foundation.
     
  4. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    We have alot of that around here. Common practice is drain tile inside the footings and out.

    I had to have the walls jacked on my last house, as the clay in this area has a lot of pressure and block walls can move. I then put in another sump pump on the outside, underground.

    There is a company that will fix the problem by putting in perimeter drains on the surface where the wall and the floor meet.

    I think their name is Sure-Dry or Shur-Dry or similar.

    HM
     
  5. Gross Man

    Gross Man Member

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    There is a mortar type paint you can get at Lowes or Home Depot - I think it is called Dry Lock. Also, if you have specific cracks, there is an injection epoxy system that is really neat. I had some cracks on a concrete foundation that were taking water. The builder had a guy come in that injected epoxy from the inside. Very effective and no digging. Billy
     
  6. skeezix

    skeezix Member

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    look into xypex

    http://www.xypex.com/products/product_types.php?pageID=14

    john
     
  7. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    Few interior applied products work unless there is minmal water pressure. With time the water wins. Epoxy injection is the best solution from the inside, but it is difficult to do correctly on micro-cracks.

    Positive drainage away from house is #1. Basement walls should be tarred and 6 mill visqueen applied over the tar and draped down over the exterior footing to wall connection. The wall should then be backfilled with atleast 1' thick #6 stone aginst the wall. NOT DIRT. This allows the surface water that does get against your wall to run down to your drainage tile. The tile should be beside the footer, not on top of it, but few basement contractors spend the extra labor to do it right.
     
  8. ntgr8

    ntgr8 Member

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    I have used DRYLOK it worked good for me. Easy to apply, stinks like hell.
     
  9. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    Just remember, any interior coating, crack seal, or any of this stuff is treating the symptom, not the disease.

    Like Setterman said, they'll only work if the water pressure is minimal.

    The key is to keep the water away from the foundation in the first place.
     
  10. DoubleAuto

    DoubleAuto Well-Known Member

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    Use poured walls in your basement construction. Built two homes in the last 14 years with poured wall basements. Our current home with a slanting front yard towards the home. Have never had a single leak of any kind.

    DoubleAuto
     
  11. R.Kipling

    R.Kipling Well-Known Member

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    I've had water in my basement twice in 35 years. The first time was while we were building and had no grading or downspouts & drains.

    The second time was about two years ago when I discovered that two of the plastic pipe couplings I had installed on the downspouts had cracked after years underground and a really cold winter. We dug up and replaced the couplings and it's been dry ever since. Nothing lasts forever.

    Proper draining and getting the water away from the foundation is the only way to stay dry.

    IMHO,
    Kip
     
  12. shannon391

    shannon391 Active Member

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    If you could come out with an interior coating that stopped all water problems you could become a multimillionair.

    Most real problems require digging and damproofing, tile and stone work.

    Some companies channel the problem from the inside to a crock -pump. {interior channel}.
     
  13. gdbabin

    gdbabin TS Member

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    Being from southern Louisiana originally where we don't have basements for obvious reasons, I have trouble understanding the logic in digging a huge deep hole under one's abode.


    Most of us are outdoorsy types and would wager that a ton of us have spent time camping out in mother nature. No self-respecting experienced mountain man; Injun, or mangy coyote for that matter would ever set up his sleeping area on top of a hole. While locating your tepee in a valley to shield the cold wind may be prudent; building a berth on top of a sink hole is begging for a wet night. Of course if one had a problem with peein' the bed, this may be a great way to go...


    Unfortunately, my current house too has a great big hole beneath. Ya see my beloved redheaded wife is a Yankee from New England and evidently folks from that part of the country relish living with the prospect of impending disaster.


    Amazingly enough not only is there the aforementioned great abyss under the crib, there's a five-foot wide uncovered trench with steps that descends from ground level to the subterranean basement floor thereof. The genius that designed this hydraulic wonder incorporated a drain at said trench landing just outside the basement door that feeds another smaller, yet deeper hole within that in turn houses an automatic electric pump contraption.


    Theoretically the de-watering contraption then sucks out the smaller, yet deeper hole and sends the insidious liquid up, eight feet or so back onto the very same yard from wince the H2O originated. Now I ain't no brain sawbones, and got kicked out of the third grade fer shavin', but that my friend is just plain dumb.


    Dumber yet my fellow shooters is my occasional lapse in checking to make sure the damned drain isn't plugged-up. Yep, the great flood and resultant mess.


    I told the red-headed Yankeefied mother of my beloved heathen offspring that the next time that hole leaks the first drop of agua, I'm gonna fill the entire damned thing up with concrete and put my house on a slab like it belongs!


    blkcloud,


    I feel yer pain my brother; however, your handle may be self-fulfilling. Perhaps ye should consider changing it to "happyf'ingsmiley", or "dryholecloud", or just go straight to the point with "Imscrewed".



    Guy Babin
     
  14. Savage99Stan

    Savage99Stan Active Member

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    We built with poured walls, double footing tiles sloped away to grade 150 feet away into a dry well, key locked the walls to the footings, tarred the outside and it stayed dry til Christmas three years ago....water was so deep around the basement it came in through the window well/egress window. We had a sump pump, put another in the window well and both ran constanly.

    Had to break out the perimeter inside, put in drain tile and connect to inside sump. Still lots of pumping.

    When the weather broke, I started digging up the drain line at the outlet. Thirty feet in, (closer to the house) I found a root ball where the pipes had seperated during the 30 years it had been in. Pulled the ball, a solid four inch stream of water ran for 45 minutes. All has been dry ever since.

    What Timb99 said, and I add....keep the drains open and sloped away from the house.

    We were so distraught we even put in a generator to power the sump pumps if power went out. It has never had to run and the window well pump has been silent for the last three years.

    Good luck. One guy told me that when you dig a hole in the ground and line it with concrete a better name than basement, sooner or later, is swimming pool.
     
  15. TC

    TC TS Member

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    You will be glad you have that hole under the house when a tornado comes knocking on your door. Also agree you have to keep surface water away, use the longest downspouts you can find and keep your gutters clean.
     
  16. gdbabin

    gdbabin TS Member

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    Joe,


    Thank you my friend for the vote of confidence. The only problem with your suggestion therewith is my dire lack of knowing my ass from a hole in the ground. How apropos...


    My mamma told me a long time ago though, similar to Forest's mamma, but not quite as sweetly: "Not only do ye do stupid stuff son, you may be just as stupid as you act.:



    TC,


    Your point is well taken, and seems wise on the surfce. However, anyone choosing to live in tornado alley may be cause for concern. Now if I remember correctly, Dorothy and her stupid dog Toto lived in Kansas. A state probably second only to Oklahoma for the propensity fer twisters. Why didn’t she get in the tater cellar?


    It seems that even with the abyss under the abode, one has to be smart enough to get your buttocks in there when trouble ensues. I guess we have to give Dorothy a break—after all she believed in witches, straw men and such….


    I have a dear friend from Kansas. He’s known for his propensity for molesting pheasants. Perhaps you’ve heard of him here. I know for a fact he’s much smarter than Dorothy ever was, although not as good lookin’. He’s survived many a twister in his beloved Kansas, and I’ll wager a flood er three in the abyss too!


    Guy B
     
  17. blkcloud

    blkcloud Active Member

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    gdbabin..whats the gd stand for? as far as my basement..have you ever heard of a tornado? can you imagine trying to round up 4 girls in the middle of the night to head outside to a storm shelter? I guess I may take it to the extreme but I have seen what they can do and when I can do something a little extra to protect my faimly I'll do it.. if it were not for them I would not have one..
     
  18. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    You need a basement so you have a place to put the furnace.

    Duh.

    HM
     
  19. Bisi

    Bisi TS Member

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    One of the best things in the world is a dry basement, and the one of the worst is a wet one. I've got a block basement and it never had a drop of water in it until a couple of years ago. What a mess, even an inch is horrible! I fixed the problem by installing new gutters. Over a 30 years and a couple of ice storms the gutters pulled away and got bent to where they weren't draining correctly. Just a 1/4 inch space between the roof and gutter will allow tons of water in run down the wall of the basement. I also had an old rose bush right next to the house, the roots went straigth down and the water went right down the hole.

    Also one of the underground pipes from the downspout got plugged. Now I just have pipes on top of ground running 8 feet away from the house. Kinda bitch to mow around, but no roots are going block these.

    Like others have mentioned above, get the water away from the house!!! Gutters that are clean and have the proper pitch to flow water to downspouts and pipes/downspouts that will take the water away from the house. That is the answer, all else is bs until you fix that problem. Been there, done that, back to having a dry basement.

    PS - living in tornado alley, I'm sure glad I got that hole in the ground.
     
  20. TNCoach

    TNCoach Member

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    Nashville just broke the monthly record with 15.44" of rain in a month and it has to go somewhere...the newscaster says that 4" more are just off to the west and headed for Music City.

    I think everyone in Middle Tennessee is going to have water in their basements even if they don't have a basement.

    God Bless,
    TNCoach
     
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