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OT kitchen knife OT

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Shotgunbutch, Jan 14, 2008.

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  1. Shotgunbutch

    Shotgunbutch Member

    Joined:
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    What are a GOOD quality kitchen knives? I have a set of Chicago Cutlery but want quality brand. You ideas would be appreciated.

    Arnie
     
  2. cdconley

    cdconley TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    643
    Cutco.
     
  3. pendennis

    pendennis Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Southeast Michigan - O/S Detroit
    Gerber, Russell

    Best,
    Dennis
     
  4. motordoctor

    motordoctor Shoji Tabuchi in Branson

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    ohio
    whistoff or henckel
     
  5. bigbore613

    bigbore613 Active Member

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    4,469
    Henkel, Ciaphalon. Jeff
     
  6. kenf

    kenf Active Member

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    Cutco,

    USA made, super sharp and stay that way. Cna be sent back to factory for service, and they stand behind their warranty. They aren't the cheapest, but you can pick them up on ebay pretty reasonable.
     
  7. oz

    oz Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,817
    go to a KNIFE store. I buy all mine from cove cutlery.com I find the best that I can afford are Kershaw Shun. they are damascus with an incredibly hard/sharp core. oz
     
  8. Finprof

    Finprof TS Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2007
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    167
    My wife is a real "foodie" whose hobby is cooking and going to cooking classes. Vacation last year was a week at the Culinary Institute of America.
    Her main knife is a Shun - the damascus knife mentioned in the post above. They run better than $100 per knife, but hold an edge better than anything I have ever tried - much better than a 1970's Puma or Randall hunting knife.

    The Shun carves the turkey on Thanksgiving after it has been cutting all of the other items for the previous two or three days without a sharpening in between.

    Morimoto has his knives custom made by a custom maker in Japan. I was thinking about finding out the maker and trying to get one for my wife. That would be better than a Shun.
     
  9. benniesdad

    benniesdad TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    161
    Here is another vote for Kershaw Shun knives. Cooking is my other hobby and I have tried plenty of other knives, but these are the best I have ever owned. Their basic knives have a very distinctive “D” shaped grip in either right or left hand models which you will either love or hate. They make a couple of other lines, but that is what I like. I can also strongly recommend Wusthof knives, but make sure you are looking at their forged full bolster knives (Classics or Grand Prix) and not their stamped knives like Emeril line. If Japanese or German knives don’t float your boat, might want to check out LampsonSharp forged knives. They are USA made. Can't go wrong with any of these.
     
  10. Southern Gent

    Southern Gent TS Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    There's nothing really wrong with Chicago Cutlery, although like everyone else they make everything from garbage to really good stuff.

    On the BBQ circuit, Forschner are the overwhelming favorite.
     
  11. bigbore613

    bigbore613 Active Member

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    Hattori, only $1275.00 on sale.
     
  12. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    15,649
    Location:
    Green Bay Wisconsin
    Forschner or Giesser at the meat plant.

    HM
     
  13. FLAKETM

    FLAKETM TS Member

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    458
    The pros always used Dexter but I don't know if they are still in business. I own once that is nearly 60 years old and it's real, real fine.
     
  14. Capt. Morgan

    Capt. Morgan TS Member

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    Look at <I>GLOBAL</I>...but be sure the knife feels comfortable in your hand whatever you buy. Never buy a knife that you haven't actually held in your hand. Be sure it is not difficult to hold when the handle is slippery and that it does not rub your fingers raw when you use it. It should feel secure and balanced as you grip it.

    There is no point in buying an expensive knife if it will stay in rack because it feels awkward to use. A comfortable moderately-priced knife is an infinitely better choice than an awkward high dollar one.

    Morgan
     
  15. Kolar Dan

    Kolar Dan Member

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  16. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    25,251
    Location:
    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    GINSU!
    They cut through nails and still can slice a tomato!<br>
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>Actually, my Gerbers have served me well.
     
  17. magnumshot

    magnumshot Active Member

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    Location:
    Mid-Atlantic
    Cutco again. Find a local salesman and have him give you a demonstration. I just bought a Cutco santuku for $85.00 at a gun show and am very happy with it. I also have short and long paring knives, and a tomato knife with a smaller knife block. Couldn't be happier. They're good looking knives too. Don't use a scrubbie to wash them, or it will scratch the finish. I hand wash mine with a sponge, and soap and hot water. Whole sets run into the hundreds, but you can add to your set one at a time. I've had others, and Cutco are great knives. I'm going to get more, and if you ask what is the best hunting knife, many will say Cutco as well.
     
  18. BigM-Perazzi

    BigM-Perazzi Well-Known Member

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    8,542
    Location:
    HELL, MICHIGAN
    Testing Lab

    A Better Chefs Knife
    from the Episode: Rainy Day BBQ Pork Chops

    In search of an improved mousetrap, we tested seven knives with innovative designs.

    Update: January, 2007

    During the last two years, we have published or updated four reviews of chef's knives. During this time, our
    recommended knife has been and continues to be the Victorinox Fibrox 8-inch chef's knife. Besides this review of
    seven innovative designs, please refer to:

    Inexpensive Chef's Knives: A review of knives below $50.

    The $90 Chef's Knife Meets the $30 Upstart: A comprehensive comparison
    of both expensive and inexpensive knives.

    Custom-made Chef's Knife: A review of the Kramer knife—what do you
    get for $475?

    Article
    We ask a lot of our chef's knives in the test kitchen. We want one that's versatile enough to handle almost any
    cutting task, whether it's mincing delicate herbs or cutting through meat and bones. We want a sharp blade that
    slices easily, without requiring a lot of force. We want a comfortable handle that doesn't hurt our hands or get
    slippery when wet or greasy.

    We've tested 30 knives in recent years (see links above), and we know what we like. But manufacturers have
    recently begun offering new designs that challenge many of our assumptions about the classic chef's knife. We've
    seen unusual handle angles and blades, ergonomic designs for reducing hand fatigue and improving grip, and a
    variety of other features that promise better handling and easier cutting. Would any of these prove to be a real
    improvement? We pitted seven innovative knives against the winners of our last comprehensive testing, the
    Victorinox Fibrox and the Wüsthof Grand Prix. (The Grand Prix has been replaced by the Grand Prix II; we used the
    new model for this test.)

    Handle with Care
    A good handle should virtually disappear in your grip, making the knife the oft-cited "extension of your hand." The
    knives in our lineup featured handles shaped like metal triangles or wedges, handles tilted upward, handles covered
    with spongy plastic or pebbled polypropylene, and handles with ergonomic bumps and bulges.

    Metal handles on the Chroma Type 301 and Furi FX with Coppertail became slippery when wet or greasy. We
    continued slipping and sliding with the Wüsthof Grand Prix II's pebble-textured polypropylene handle. The slick
    plastic grip was heavy and uncomfortable, making the knife feel "angular and awkward."

    Testers were more impressed by Alton's Angle, a striking knife designed by Food Network star Alton Brown. Instead
    of continuing straight from the blade, its handle rises in a 10-degree angle to keep knuckles clear of the cutting
    board. This provided leverage for hard cuts, but there were some complaints about the exaggerated rocking motion
    during mincing. The rounded, D-shaped grip was comfortable, but the handle's length made it bump above the wrists
    of some testers. Testers also had mixed feelings about the bright green ergonomic handle on the Sanelli Premana.
    Although they liked the "squishy" feel of the handle, chickeny hands had trouble gripping this knife.

    The one innovative handle that really won testers over was on the Ken Onion knife by Kershaw Shun. (Ken Onion is
    a well-regarded knife-maker.) The short wooden handle arcs downward, with a pronounced bump on the belly. The
    metal bolster is cut away to help fingers grip the blade and mercifully extends over the sharp spine to protect the
    fingers. The wood did not become slippery, and testers reported that the knife felt natural and maneuverable as they
    worked. A nice touch: The bottom of the bolster stops 1/2 inch short of the knife's heel, allowing it to pass completely
    through a sharpening device.

    Sticking Point
    To keep food from sticking as you slice, designers cut dimples all over the blade surface on the Glestain Indented-
    Blade Gyutou; used rippled steel on the Ken Onion and Alton's Angle knives; and made the MAC Superior blade
    super-thin and light, with a roughened strip running just above the cutting edge. In contrast to most of the changes
    to traditional handle design, we found all of these blade innovations to be successful. These four knives received top
    scores, winning praise for their agility, ease of use, and precision cutting.

    But what made them work, aside from the no-stick blades? One clue came when we realized they were all made by
    Japanese companies, which are known for their thin-profile knives. We measured the difference in width from spine
    to blade and found that, indeed, the Japanese knives started out thinner at the spine--as much as 40 percent
    thinner--than the losing knives and also narrowed less as they neared the cutting edge, with our top Japanese knife,
    the Glestain, varying by less than 1 millimeter from spine to edge. Why would this matter? As it enters food, your
    knife can either cut or act as a wedge that pushes the food apart. While a wedge-like blade can be useful for jobs
    like splitting open a heavy squash, it can rip food and make slicing slower and less precise.

    Testers praised the Glestain for its "super-smooth" slicing. Mincing was so efficient it made "parsley almost like dust."
    It made quick work of raw chicken, onions, and squash, and it stayed sharp throughout testing. The MAC knife,
    lighter and more utilitarian than the Glestain, was equally sharp and efficient, and testers had high praise for the
    blades on both Kershaw knives.

    So is there a new world order, with Japanese knives taking the lead from traditional Western styles? Not so fast. Our
    previous test kitchen winner, the very affordable Swiss-made Victorinox Fibrox ($22.95), defeated the best of the
    innovative newcomers, though just barely. A closer look revealed that, like the Japanese models, its spine starts out
    thinner and tapers less steeply than other Western knives. This lightweight knife is particularly agile, and the nonslip
    handle is very comfortable. We found plenty to admire among the top-rated Japanese knives in this test, but we are
    hard-pressed to pay a premium—sometimes as much as $175—for their innovations.
     
  19. gbatch

    gbatch TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    259
    Cutco. Have them send you a catalog. Guaranteed for life last time I checked. Just saw a special on Discovery or History channel dealing with how Cutco makes its knives. Quality stuff and still made in the USA.

    Gene Batchelar
    Wheaton, IL
     
  20. Ron Frazier

    Ron Frazier TS Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2006
    Messages:
    360
    Ka-Bar? Also opens cans!
     
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