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OT--iMac vs PC

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by VietVet, Oct 4, 2007.

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  1. VietVet

    VietVet TS Member

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    My old PC running XP Pro is on terminal life support, and I was wondering if any of our esteemed experts could give me an opinion as to the worth of an iMac in place of another Bill Gates supporting PC.

    The iMac is a wonderful elegant piece of engineering, but is it worth the money? We, my wife and I, use a computer for internet access, word processing, simple spread sheets, and graphics.

    Any input would be most appreciated.

    TIA
     
  2. Buddy O

    Buddy O TS Member

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    I've had both, but the Mac wins hands down! Super user friendly, no viruses, great tech service, unbeatable graphics, no tower, etc, etc. It's worth the extra $$s
     
  3. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    I'm a little leary of the brand new iMAC but especially cuz I had one of the old types that was a serious lemon. Now in a G4 MAC and lots cheaper than the new model. I'd look at a used G4 or G5 with OS X and know that I had a really good, reliable tech nearby to speed up your learning curve over your PC experience. I'm MAC oriented and enjoy the lack of any serious outside attacks to the 'puter or system....Bob Dodd
     
  4. crk

    crk Member

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    If you buy an intel based MAC you can run the Apple OSX or Windows. Booting up a mac is MUCH faster - you will be online with a mac before any windows machine is even ready for you to do anything with it. Much less worry (almost nil) about viruses in the OSX world, too.
     
  5. Tailbuster

    Tailbuster TS Member

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    Viet,

    For your purposes either machine will do the job very well. If you were heavy on the graphics end then I might lean toward the Mac. Is it worth the money? That's always been hard for me to justify for Apple products so I stay with PC's. Mac folks are pretty happy with their purchases but I just can't get past the idea that I have to spend a premium and then still upgrade in a few years or so as the processors and components are now too slow or too small. Just my worthless .02.

    edit: One other thing I don't do is buy the absolute fastest pc available at the time. I'm usually a couple or a few steps down from that. Saves a lot of money, runs the programs of the day very well, and still needs to be upgraded about the same time as the fastest one does. Also, buy whats inside not the brand of the pc ( I do shy away from the cheapest ones). Go for larger hard drives, faster processor and more memory. Compaq's and HP's are both made by HP(good quality overall), Dell's prices usually end up similar to what you can find for a similar computer at the stores.

    all the best,
    john
     
  6. Neil Winston

    Neil Winston Well-Known Member

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    I'm a 30-year Apple user, starting with a 2e and now writing on a G5 with an Intel no doubt in my future. I've also needed a PC for some uses and an HP is in a box on my table to replace a dead PC laptop, the second one I've had in the last couple of years. (My four now-distributed Mac Laptops are all running still.)

    The PC's all have had some weird characteristic. The latest one, a Winbook, when it worked, would start making a clicking noise when playing chess online. You want a click when you or your opponent moves, but this one would start adding clicks, then more, then more, until you had to kill the program and try again.

    The Mac is so much better a machine for home use I can't imagine using anything else. I can't recommend it highly enough.

    Neil
     
  7. Baber

    Baber TS Member

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    Been a Mac user since 1984. Won't use anything else. There is an old adage.... why bay a copy when you can buy the original.... WINDOZ is a Mac copy.

    I currently have a MacBook and my bookkeeper uses a G5 IMAC. We generally upgrade systems every 3-4 years. I have a copy of WindoZ XP on my MacBook as there are a couple of programs from some of the companies I sell for that only run under WINDOZ. Its a pain but it works.

    Recently I was arguing this issue with a friend and his first question was "what virus protection do you use" my reply was "I don't". He shut up.

    Suggest that you buy the biggest hard drive you can afford. You can easily add RAM to any of the MACs but adding a internal hard drive is a B....

    Buy a MAC you will be happier

    TB
     
  8. Ahab

    Ahab Well-Known Member

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    Unless you are into real heavy graphics, any of the new dual core processor copmputers will do anything that you need.

    My advice is that since you are now PC based, stay with it and have XP Pro installed. You will be able to use whatever programs that you already own on the new puter. If you switch to a Mac you will have to buy new programs which are way more expensive.
     
  9. Baber

    Baber TS Member

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    Ahab's assersion are BS. All the major programs for Mac and PC cost the same and in many cases you can purchase the upgrade from one platform to another at the same price. Any new Mac comes with some great programs FREE. ILIFE which contains IMovie, IPhoto are great. Also you can buy IWORK for less about $80 that gives you Keynote, Numbers and Pages that in many cases is better than MS Office. Also you can still download Appleworks for free.

    And just remember..... NO VIRUS protections software needed....

    TB
     
  10. Ahab

    Ahab Well-Known Member

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    TB ... spoken like a true machead!

    :)
     
  11. jimx200

    jimx200 Member

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    I just finished "trying" to buy a new IMac and it did not go as expected. I went to out local Apple Store and told the rep I needed to use my Windows business software (pricing program) and was assured their units would run it (and any) flawlessly. I then told him I would like to install on their demo unit and see how it looks/works...he was very reluctant and assured me after I bought their new computer if I had any problems to just call their tech service line and at worst, a simple return...oh, and don't forget the 15% "restocking" fee. I said no way, prove to me this works with my software. Manager comes over and said "let me prove to you how easy our system can run it"...NOT. Not 30 seconds into the download, error messages pop up, their "tech" is called over...no problem he says. After myself and by now, about 4-5 other potential business customers were watching, it would not load. He said software was corrupt...bs. I then gave him another program to load...SAME THING...won't load. Their claim of Apple computers being able to run any Windows based program is BOGUS. To talk to a Apple service tech via phone, even under warranty, will cost you $50.! So no Apples for me. BTW, I did notice the Made in China sticker on their unit. It's no wonder the business world runs on PC's. I think the last numbers I saw was a 94% market share for PC's.
     
  12. Baber

    Baber TS Member

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    JIMX200>>>

    Sorry that someone did not do a good demo. They should have run it under the Parrells program where you have a window for XP and its like a computer within a computer. I have a similar program for machine sizing that runs great this way. I wonder weather they were trying to run it under XP or Vista? It could be that they tried under Vista and your program won't run under Vista. The reality of the situation is that us Mac people have a hard time dealing with WINDOZ people. You guys are worse than SKEET shooters.

    Your 94% figure is incorrect.... its 91% .... Macintosh gained 3% market share last month.... It appears we have finally started closing the gap mainly because people are getting tired of all the WINDOZ junk.

    TB
     
  13. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    Macs are just "Way-Too-Cute"! An "i" anything will probably be a bit overpriced. They function well and will do everything you need it too. A PC can also do what you need for less cost. If you have money to burn, a Mac is fine.

    Since you are open to trying a new operating system, why not try Linux? You can do eMail, surf the net, play with Video and images, work with "office" documents (Open Office), and much of the software is FREE! You can buy a machine preloaded or install your own. You can also try it with a "live" disk to see if you like it before installing it without changing anything. As for security, Linux is on par or better than others. If you feel the need, there are "Free" antivirus solutions available too. There is a little learning curve, but there are resources to help you along. The best part about Linux is that is usually does not require the latest and greatest hardware to run. It will usually do fine on a system that is a few years old. You can even find a FREE distro that will run on Mac hardware.

    I have worked with all three and prefer the PC platform, but not restricted to Windows. A PC with Linux will do just fine for 98% of what I do. The other 2% would be when fixing other Windows machines, so some of that is occasionally restricted to Windows itself.
     
  14. Buddy O

    Buddy O TS Member

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    TBaber is right. My Mac runs Windows thru Parallels & it works flawlessly.
     
  15. Baber

    Baber TS Member

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    Open Office is also available for Macintosh. The new IBM suite software will also be available for free after the first of the year. Linux is nice but it does not have the installed base and elegance of the Macintosh platform. The real difference in cost is not that much. If you are concerned about cost buy a Mac-Mini and reuse your existing monitor and keyboard. Its a myth that Macs are "way too expensive". Do an honest evaluation and you will see that Macs are very competitive.

    TB
     
  16. pb

    pb TS Member

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    Get the iMac and you will love it!

    Jon
     
  17. esoxhunter

    esoxhunter Well-Known Member

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    I have had 6 PC's. (Dell (2)-HP (2)-Compaq-Gateway) I now own an iMac. There isn't a comparison. It's like comparing a Kreighoff to a Mossberg. I sure wasted a lot of money before wising up and buying a Mac. Ed
     
  18. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    Look people. If you grew up using Basic and CPM and Unix before there was such a thing as DOS or MS-DOS you basically stuck with a PC, because it had more power and did more things. Those of you who think the graphics power of any Mac that ever existed was greater than could be had on an ordinary PC are delusional. Mac hardware and software have always been over priced.

    Now, if you don't have a Windows background, and you want a machine to do Email, surfing, home accounting, maybe some word processing, plus music, video, music and video editing (home tinkering type)and the like, wait for another couple weeks until you can buy an iMac (or other Mac of your choice) with OS-X Leopard on it. That is the very first "real" Apple operating system, in the robust and complete sense. And, the software suite they give you with it is all you'll need for most home users. You'll probably want some Office apps. Yes, you'll get ripped on the price. So what. It will save you a lot of grief.

    Now, if you want graphics horsepower you want a PC, preferably a workstation class machine. Especially if you want to run 4 or 8 monitors. Plus you can buy LCD monitors that absolutely blow any Apple display away for half the price. Cripes, even a $400 entry level Professional graphics card will blow away all the expensive, but obsolescent graphics Apple puts in their Pro machines.

    If you want computational horsepower, you want a PC. Apple assumes that anyone buying their high end machines are technically illiterate. Otherwise they could not get away with crippling them. If you are a little savvy, you'll realize you have to spend another $2,000 just to get a Mac Pro up to operable configuration.

    Do not, I repeat, DO NOT make the mistake of believing you can run any, or even most PC software apps on an Intel based Mac. Wine, and Cross Over and Parallels are not ready for prime time. If you boot into Windows on a Mac, you still have memory issues, and driver issues. Typically, graphics cards, etc. for a Mac are specifically for a Mac, and you'll have problems getting a driver that works for a Windows app. Also, there are some programs you are not going to be able to run on a Mac, no matter what.

    If I were advising a new user, or even the average home computer user on what to buy, it would be a new iMac in November with Leopard preinstalled. Yes, there are historic problems with flat panel iMacs. Yes, they are expensive. Yes, they do not perform as well as their similarly priced Windows counterparts. That's the price you have to pay for a soon to be rock solid, secure, robust OS with easy to use apps. If you've been using every version of Windows since 3.1, you may want to consider a PC with Vista. Macs really do work and operate differently.

    For more sophisticated users, if you can find the apps you want that run under Unix, buy a Mac, then upgrade it to operational level. If you want 100% compatibility with the majority of the business world, buy a PC. If you don't mind tinkering and can live with Open Source apps, buy an inexpensive PC and run one of the good Linus distros on it. You get power, graphics and security, but you have to work at it some.
     
  19. pyrdek

    pyrdek Well-Known Member

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    I have been working, in a technology support role (call it different names but the end result is the same) for my employer for maybe 15 years. I currently directly support about 200 Macs of all persuasions (Power PC Duel Xeon, down to IMac G4 and G4 laptps. I also work with the PCs but nowhere near as many as I have Macs.

    On the home front, the last three kids I sent of to college all took new Macs with them. Two years ago it was an IMac G5 and this year it was two kids, each with a MacBook (laptop).

    I would take a Mac any day over a PC. System setup is much easier, boot up is faster and overall reliability greatly favors the Macs.

    A couple of things to keep in mind however. There are some programs that are only available for the PC. Visio and Publisher are two that come to mind. If you have to run these you will need a piece of software called Parallels. This will allow you to run a virtual PC within (and at the same time as) your Mac. I have installed Parallels on several systems here at work for this reason. If you do install Parallels be aware of a couple of things.

    Another possible concern is the latest release of Microsoft's Office suite, by default, saves its files in a format that is not readable on older versions of Office. That includes the Apple version. Microsoft has already delayed the release of a compatible Apple version. There are Open Source (read that as free) versions of Office Equivalent packages out there for download. My current favorite is Neo-Office for the Mac. It is based on the Open Office package but tailored for the Apple. I am still looking deeper into it before deploying it to the systems I support. My initial testing does show promise but I have not had the time to give it the more detailed test I want to run it through.

    For LEGAL installation of Windows XP or Vista on your Mac you will need a licensed installation disk. This means you have to buy it. If you chose Vista, it is only licensed to be run on a virtual machine (your Mac) if you buy one of the two highest priced versions. =The license agreement you click on "Accept" has that in the fine print that nobody ever reads.

    There is also a new emulation program out just recently released, called VM Fusion ware (or something similar). It is functionally equivalent to Parallels from what I read but I do not have any personal experience with it.

    As for the aging process of the systems, the old G3 Macs that I have been pulling out of service after maybe 8 or 9 years, still functioned with Apples latest operating system. Equal aged PCs would choke (unless they were the VERY top end at the time and they may choke anyway) if you tried to run MS's latest OS on them. The Macs LAST! They are like that pink rabbit. They just keep going and going. I have had a very low failure rate of Mac hardware problems (barring lighting strikes or power line hits and the like).

    There has been a lot written about Vista. That written by Microsoft and their supporters are praising Vista BUT a lot of user comments are far from praise and often head exactly toward damning the new software.

    Remember also, Apple is slated to release it newest Operating System software this month. It is called Leopard or OS 10.5. You may want to hold off buying until 10.5 is released.

    As for the price difference, when we were looking at the G5 Mac two years ago, my daughter was concerned about the price. I ran a comparison for a PC and the G5 equipped comparably with hard drive, RAM etc. as close as possible to match. The Mac did come out higher, but it was by $20.00 higher on a cost of around $1,000. She originally was a PC only person. What brought her over to the Mac was when I brought home a Mac Mini for the weekend. We received it as a trial system at work. I set it up Friday evening (about 5 minutes) and when I asked her on Sunday evening, while packing it up for return, which kind of computer she wanted, she was firmly wanting a Mac. The two young daughters, after using this G5 also became firmly committed to the Mac because of their experiences with their sister's G5.

    The new "Slim-Line" Macs have a little different style keyboard. I don't have a problem with it but there have been a few people who prefer the old "traditional" style. Mac uses a USB keyboard so if you don't care for the new style, you can get an old style for maybe $20.00.
     
  20. VietVet

    VietVet TS Member

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    Thanks for all the good info, guys (& gals if appropriate). I've been a loyal PC user since the first IBM PC in the dark ages, but the virus software, the constant service packs, the never ending upgrades, etc. are getting me down. I want a tool that works, not one that I have to futz with, and from this thread and friends I've spoken to, the Mac may be the answer. I will let ya know in a year or two.

    Thanks again,

    John
     
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