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OT Electric Driers

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Ljutic111, Dec 17, 2012.

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  1. Ljutic111

    Ljutic111 TS Member

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    I`m in the market to purchase a new electric drier and I saw a few with 110V hookup . Mine is a 220V connection and I was wondering what would be the best to purchase ? What one would be cheaper to operate ?
     
  2. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    220 V will be cheaper (and faster) to operate.

    You're electric service is a 220 feed - two 110 V legs.

    You're bill is based on a reading across the two legs - a large draw on one leg only will artificially read high across the potential energy change the meter reads for both legs.

    220 V driers are the 'norm' so you will most likely find the purchase price to be lower as well.
     
  3. Shooting Jack

    Shooting Jack Active Member

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    Most of the 110V driers I have seen are apartment sized and are not as strong or durable as a 220 drier. Jackie B.
     
  4. likemybrownings

    likemybrownings Active Member

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    The idea of a 220 volt circuit being less cost to operate is a misconception. Power is consumed in watts, that said, whatever wattage is being used is still factored in Kilowatthours on your electric bill. The only difference is a 120 volt circuit will draw 2 times the amperage as the same wattage 240 volt circuit.
    DaveB
     
  5. Catpower

    Catpower Molon Labe TS Supporters

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    What Dave said
     
  6. trim tab

    trim tab Active Member

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    Dave is right or go gas if you have it.
     
  7. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    Actually, there is a difference. I was waiting for someone to jump on my comment.

    Over simplified there is an efficiency loss across the legs - in the generation field they use a ratio of "the square root of 2" as the divider.

    thus you would divide by 1.414 when going from 220 to 110

    Your power company wants you to think it is a straight translation, but it is not. You might have heard of 'load balancing' which is essentially working the wattage draw per leg (110 & 110) to be as close to equal as possible - thus saving you money on your electric bill.

    When you draw 220 V the draw across each leg is exactly equal. With 110 circuits you can draw more across one leg than the other. You pay for the higher leg rate as corrected by the 'root two' differential to the lower leg.
     
  8. Catpower

    Catpower Molon Labe TS Supporters

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    I doubt if the load imbalance will be enough to measure because they will be another appliance generally running that could be on the other leg

    I have never seen a 4500 watt 120 volt element, not to say they don't exist, generally they are about 1375-1500 watts, more than likely 1375 so they can be operated on a 20 amp circuit
     
  9. Ljutic111

    Ljutic111 TS Member

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    So I would be using more electric to dry a standard load of wash with a 110V unit and it would generaly take that much longer for the clothes to dry is what your implying . Right now a regular load takes 80 -90 minutes so therefore it may take 1 1/2 hr for one in a 110V drier . I haven`t looked long enough yet but I`m tending towards another 220V unit .
     
  10. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    Catpower,

    You are right for one item, but I have seen panels where 80% of the load was on one leg, 20% on the other.

    That can really trash an electric bill.
     
  11. likemybrownings

    likemybrownings Active Member

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    HSLDS, I call BULLSHIT!! State liscensed electrician, self employeed, industrial and agricultural control design, build. There is no phase correction OR monitoring in a residential setting. If you are interested in debating, PM me,
    DaveB
     
  12. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    Not even worth the writing.

    See above...

    Or here: http://setiathome.berkeley.edu/forum_thread.php?id=64516

    Or here: http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/archive/index.php/t-27733.html

    8 years in the generation and installation of same field. Had to size the machines to the job at hand. The 'root 2' was the correction we used to size correctly.

    I've seen real fuel economy drop on gen-sets where there was a load in-balance across the 110 V legs, so I presume it's real...
     
  13. Catpower

    Catpower Molon Labe TS Supporters

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    HSLDS, you're probably right, that brings up one question that no one has ever been able ti answer for me, how come it is legal under the NEC to undersize the neutral by one size, suppose everything in the building was running 120, shouldn't the neutral be doubled?
     
  14. Sharp1

    Sharp1 Member

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    Killowatts= Volts X Amps X Power-Factor then devide by 1000.

    There is no conspiracy...WTF "the square root of 2"..BS

    Bottom line the 240V unit will dry your cloths twice as fast. GL
     
  15. Catpower

    Catpower Molon Labe TS Supporters

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    Sharp, only if it has twice as much wattage
     
  16. Sharp1

    Sharp1 Member

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    Cat how about this...

    Watts= Volt X Amp X Power Factor

    Always get suspecious when a "expert" refers to 110V and 220V...

    Plug your volt meter into a wall socket and see what you get.

    GL
     
  17. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    220v is the way to go for an electric dryer. 110v should only be used if you have no other choice. The wattage rating of the drying elements is lower (so it will not overload the 110v wiring), so it's going to have to run longer to dry.

    You need to weigh what it will cost to wire a 220v service if you don't have one, and especially if you are not able to wire it yourself. Electricians are not cheap. And even if you do it yourself, you'll probably have to pull a permit and get an inspection done.

    Frankly, given the cost of an electrician, if I had natural gas service in the house already, it would be cheaper to have a natural gas line extended to the laundry room. That's exactly what I did when I upgraded to a gas water heater, and had a tap added for a future gas dryer. The drier motor and controls run on 110v, but the heating is done by natural gas, which right now is much cheaper than electricity. Gas driers are fast compared to electric. We usually don't even use the normal setting, but the light setting.
     
  18. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Sharp1, voltage varies between 110 and 120v, and 220v and 240v, depending on your local power company. This was especially common decades ago, when some companies provided 220v while other used 240v. I grew up in an area with 110/220 volt service, so I've always said that even though where I live now is supposed to be 120/240.

    Even then my service has varied over the years. While it is never been 110v, it has been 115v to 117v. Lately it's been closer to 120v. This changes depending on how the grid is set up. Voltage will drop when there are a lot of customers on a certain size transformer at the substation. Split the load and put half of them on a new transformer, or install a bigger transformer to handle more load, and the voltage will go back up. Voltage also varies seasonally. We see less voltage in the winter or in August, when demands for heating and cooling are higher.

    As such, I don't fault anyone for saying 110v or 220v, instead of the more technically correct 120v or 240v. It's a struggle as it is to get some people to understand what wattage is, and the relationship between volts and amps for the same load.
     
  19. Catpower

    Catpower Molon Labe TS Supporters

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    I agree Sharp, kind of like one of my spot welders, I was telling a fella one time that it takes 18,666 amps to weld on high

    He wouldn't believe me but it is a 28kw spot welder, but it's only 1.5 V at the electrode

    That's why the tongs are 2 inch solid copper
     
  20. Sharp1

    Sharp1 Member

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    Brain,

    Many states have Code requirements and the elected officials pass the laws that we tend to follow(NESC and NEC to name a few)... Electricty for example in my State requires 120V + or - 5%. So if your provider supplies 114V-126V they are meeting the Code. My point is if your Utility is supplying Voltage at 110V or 220V they are most likely violateing the Code.

    GL
     
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