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OT: Crossbow recommendations

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Tron, Oct 4, 2009.

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  1. Tron

    Tron Supporting Vendor Supporting Vendor

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    6,672
    I'd like to hear some thoughts from people with experience about Crossbows. I would like to use it for hunting. I do not need a DNR/MNR lecture, just good information.
     
  2. cbxchris

    cbxchris Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2006
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    771
    Ten Point .....nothing else is worth considering if you want the best within financial reason. Been there and done that.
     
  3. crusha

    crusha TS Member

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    5,762
    What...afraid your Beretta slugster will blow up?
     
  4. WarEagle2017

    WarEagle2017 Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2006
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    1,449
    Bow tech is the best, 10 Point is also a great one, make sure you get the one with all the bells and whistles............. Be prepared to spend about $1800 or more on a good one Barnett is for beginners and the rest are for novices. Go Bo Tech or 10 Point
     
  5. Rem870TB

    Rem870TB Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    617
    I found Excaliburs to be very accurate and easy to maintain.

    I have attached the website address for their forum, it, in turn, has a link to their website.
     
  6. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    5,481
    Location:
    Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania
    I bought one in 2007 and after doing a lot of research, chose a Parker Terminator 150 for several reasons.

    1)ACCURACY: A crossbow, like any weapon, depends upon its trigger for accuracy potential. That also applies to crossbows and even vertical bows when a string release is employed. Crossbows have 150 or more pounds of pressure on the "hook" holding the string back, so sliding that "hook" off the string takes a lot of effort and that results in a stiff trigger with a lot of travel. Parker employs a linkage that makes their triggers feel like a rifle trigger. From a bench at 30 yards, mine will put three bolts with 100-grain Rage three-blade mechanical broadheads into just over an inch.

    2)WEIGHT: I've forgotten the actual numbers but every owner of a Ten-Point and most other popular brand of crossbow who has picked my Parker up has commented about how light it is.

    3)VELOCITY: For some reason, 150-pound draw weight Parkers generate about the same velocity as other 175-pound draw weight crossbows. The higher the draw weight, the higher the rate of wear on strings, limbs and the rest of the crossbow. My 150 does 312fps over my chronograph; most 175s are rated at 323fps.

    4)MAINTENANCE: Aside from checking screws for tightness periodically, there is none on a Parker. Owners of other brands tell me that the rails upon which the string slides require periodic lubrication and other maintenance steps performed.

    5)PRICE: Parkers aren't the cheapest crossbows but they sure aren't the most expensive, either. I bought mine well into the 2007 deer season when they were on sale, which was also right after Parker introduced their 175-pound Terminator, which might have resulted in a price reduction on the 150s. With a three-dot non-magnifying scope, a quiver and four bolts, I paid $486 plus tax for mine. It's hard to pay more than $800 for a Parker at most places that sell them around here.

    6)SERVICE: Parkers are made by a bunch of archery hunters from Virginia who will always speak with you over the phone to answer any questions you might have. I'm a sucker for that stuff and after calling the home office of every brand of crossbow I was considering, I was really hoping a Parker would be the bow I decided upon after that initial call.

    I did have one gripe with mine. The buttpad was curved outward at the toe, causing it to hang up on my clothing and dig into my chest. I could have had it replaced with a flat pad but just ground the curve out of it.

    I would advise against a thumbhole stock unless it is truly ambidextrious. I have two rifles with thumbhole stocks and found that while it can be done, shooting them left-handed is tough. I heard a noise from behind the right side of the tree my ladder stand is in during muzzleloader season two years ago and when I switched my T/C Omega around in my hands just in case, I discovered that I really had to girate around to shoot it left-handed.

    Finally, one of the rope-type cocking devices is all you need. Most of the crank-type devices I've seen are slower and noisier and they all add weight to the bow. It is important to use some kind of cocking device as even if you are physically able to cock it by hand, it is hard to keep the string centered as you draw it. If the string isn't drawn evenly, the bolt flight will be affected.

    Sorry for the long post but I thought you might benefit from the months I spent exploring the many crossbow options out there.

    Ed
     
  7. KodiakBear

    KodiakBear TS Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2006
    Messages:
    11
    Thats a second for Parkers. Had nothing but success with their crossbows as well as compounds.
     
  8. rooferbob

    rooferbob Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    1,474
    Location:
    Hamilton Ohio
    I'm surprized that no one mentioned the "Horton Legend 175". I've had one for three years, still like new and very accurate.175 lb pull.
    These things work great and don't cost 1800 only about $529.00 at Bass Pro.
    Rooferbob
     
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