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OT-Concrete ?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Bvr Tail, May 22, 2007.

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  1. Bvr Tail

    Bvr Tail Well-Known Member

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    Not in my drive! Too thin for much traffic, but performance concrete can do wonders. How many joints installed for cracking?

    Danny
     
  2. Robb

    Robb Member

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    Probably has fiber in the mix. I don't think they use fiber with rebar.
     
  3. JB Logan Co. Ohio

    JB Logan Co. Ohio TS Member

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    OK .......for now. They could have used the concrete that has the "stuff" cut up in it. Personally I'd use wire mesh. Not that I'm an expert or anything, JMHO.

    JB=Jerry Beach 8503917
     
  4. Argentina

    Argentina TS Member

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    Yes....this driveway is O.K........I am sure that the concrete used has Fiberglass mesh mixed in with it. This mesh really strengthens the concrete and really there is no need for the wire mesh and rebar if you use it.

    Just remember, all concrete will crack eventually, I don't care how much rebar and metal wire mesh or fiberglass that you put in it. All you can do with concrete is to control where it cracks. That is why you put expansion joints in it and cut the concrete.

    I am sure that this driveway that was poured yesterday has either expansiion joints in it or it will be cut to control the cracking.
     
  5. blizzard

    blizzard Active Member

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    They will probably come back and cut the grooves once it's cured. It's difficult to cut them before the concrete sets. :)


    Brett D.
     
  6. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    5" is standard for drives. 4" is questionable. If they used fibremesh, your OK if not, it will break up after winter. Expansion cuts should be at square equal spacings . In this case the cuts should be 11' x 10' ( 1 cut down the middle, and 5 equal at 10' across the 22' dimension) Yes, I'm a contractor.
     
  7. kolar12

    kolar12 Member

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    Setterman--when a drive gets older and gets that ugly black growth like stuff on it, how do you remove it? I assume it is organic. I used a pressure washer on it and did not like the results. Gary
     
  8. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Muriatic acid is HCl. It will both kill plants and react with concrete. I do not think I would put it on a concrete drive.

    Pat Ireland
     
  9. teleskier

    teleskier Member

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    HCL will etch the concrete. Use if you want to paint it or seal it somehow.

    Maybe try pressure wash then some type of mold inhibitor that is used in paints or maybe just household bleach.
     
  10. ANTRIM UDF

    ANTRIM UDF TS Member

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    These contractors have Lic plates from North Carolina and have the last name of Sherwood? Or were they of the Hispanic variety?
     
  11. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    Toss some coke or pepsi on your black and cruddy concrete, even moss. Amazing what we drink, eh? If I were motiviated, I'd use the bleach idea Steve suggests....breakemall....Bob Dodd

    PS BTW, the muriatic acid, as Pat says, is a weak Hydrochloric acid but well watered down, it can be used to clean the surface in a hurry. Take care by having one person in rubber boots and gloves doing the brushing and another with a hose rinsing as quickly as necessary to stop the action as desired. Used properly it will remove broomed surfaces on the concrete and leave you with a "sand finish" that is quite attractive, appears aged. You're surely not going to use that process every year though and plants close to the surface will suffer....BD
     
  12. Big Heap

    Big Heap TS Member

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    We only use four inches to control weeds. Suggest you contact the concrete supplier who will give good advice - probably to pour more mud.
     
  13. Jerbear

    Jerbear TS Member

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    This was poured last Friday and cut on Saturday. 6", 6 bag mix and re-barred to the old driveway. By the way the old driveway is also 6" thick and re-barred. It's almost 31 years old. No cracks and no chunks gone.

    After the cuts and caulk. Getting ready to be painted for a basketball half court.

    <a href="http://photobucket.com" target="_blank">[​IMG]</a>
    <a href="http://photobucket.com" target="_blank">[​IMG]</a>

    <a href="http://photobucket.com" target="_blank">[​IMG]</a>


    The rest of the new cement

    <a href="http://photobucket.com" target="_blank">[​IMG]</a> <a href="http://photobucket.com" target="_blank">[​IMG]</a>

    Had to pressure wash the hydraulic fluid off the driveway from the hopper but after a day of washing all is good.

    Jerbear
     
  14. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    The fiber additive is a major improvement over rebar for any residential application and many commercial applications

    cut joints are better than formed joints

    the additive really does work - not only helps hold the mixture in place but allows for expansion and contraction internally

    regards

    Gene
     
  15. Whiz Bang

    Whiz Bang TS Member

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    Since I dig basements for a couple of high end home builders I see a lot of concrete being poured. The builders I work for all have rod in there concrete wire mesh seems to sink to the bottom and doesnt do that much good. Rebar you can set on stools.

    I notice some of the other builders dont use rebar. They come get the job done as fast as they can and get out. Its a difference between price and quality you get what you pay for. The problem is a lot of these cheap concrete jobs are done on high end homes and the future owners arnt aware of it.
     
  16. cementman

    cementman Member

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    Whoa, where do I begin. Joint spacing is a major concern with a 22" driveway and expansion joint down the middle at 11' and transverse joints cut every 11' is rule of thumb. Joints should be tooled at time of placement or within 24 hours. Concrete mix should be a 6 sack "air entrained" especially in northern freeze thaw climates. Reinforcing mesh is almost useless because it never is positioned in the top 1/3 of slab thickness as it should be. Synthetic fiber reinforcing is the way to go and cost effective, say $7.00/cy on a material cost of $90.00 for concrete. There are also specialized fibers called "structural fibers" at $18.00/cy for increased loads. Normally residentual driveways are place in a 4" thickness and are satisfactory for vehicle traffic. Increasing slab thickness to 5" along with "structural fibers" you can pull semi's on your drive. Regarding joints, sorry to say Jerbear, in one of your pictures there appears to be an expansion joint coming off a fence post then on a 45 degree angle, a crack will most certainly appear at juncture of straight line and angle, no way to prevent. To end, the most critical part of concrete, proper curing. Curing retains the moisture in the concrete to develop strength and durability. Curing can be accomplished by fog spraying the surface and keeping wet for 4 to 7 days or a more simplified method of applying a high solids white piqmented. liquid membrane curing compound. There are also curing compounds that are linseed based materials that provide even more moisture retention and freeze/thaw protection during the first year of exposure.
     
  17. Big Al 29

    Big Al 29 TS Member

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    Cementman: You are the mack-daddy of 'crete!! Last name must end in a vowel.

    How do you break up an Italian wedding?? Yell 'Crete's here!!!
     
  18. 12Gagejon

    12Gagejon Member

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    A big problem too is expansive soil will destroy concrete in a hurry in SoCal we have adobe to do it right you dig a "footprint" 3' bigger than boundries and 2 to 3 foot deep compact it then pour slab wiremesh no help at all 1/2 rebar 12" to 16" crisscross then wet saw expantion joints as per code or pre engineer and prestress cables in slab really adds to price Jon PS on footprint you import good nonexpansive soil 75 buck a hour plus prices of soil and compactor and soil test engineer.This cost is pass on to Owner,if you don't a Lawyer will sue you and the cost will break you.
     
  19. rodbuster

    rodbuster TS Member

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    Fibermesh is no substitute for properly placed WWF (mesh). In industrial applications, when a floor has to be warrenteed for a ten year period you will not see fibermesh used on the job. If you want a quality product, properly placed mesh or rebar is a must.
     
  20. rodbuster

    rodbuster TS Member

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    If you are pouring a structural slab, you will only see rebar or possibly 4 gauge mesh used (sometimes in combination with post-tensioning). The only real value ever seen in the use of fibermesh is to control shrinkage cracking. If you want the real deal you have to use rebar or mesh. Don't "cheap out" your job with inferior substitutes.
     
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