1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

OT- Another wood working tool - what is it?

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Porcupine, Jul 17, 2010.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Porcupine

    Porcupine Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,006
    Location:
    South Central Massachusetts
    Here's another wood working tool I inherited, but I don't know what it is. It looks like it's made to scribe parallel lines on wood. I'm sure somebody here can tell me what it is and about how old it is. Many thanks.

    LA in MA
     
  2. Porcupine

    Porcupine Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,006
    Location:
    South Central Massachusetts
    Here's another shot with the scriber extended a bit.
     
  3. Ahab

    Ahab Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,651
    It is adjustable, via the knob in the end to scribe lines or circles.
     
  4. Catpower

    Catpower Molon Labe TS Supporters

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    10,248
    Location:
    In the Cabana
    Ahab has it right it.

    They are called trammel points, at least that's what sheet metal workers call them, but ours are made out of metal, but since he was a woodworker wood makes sense
     
  5. Ljutic111

    Ljutic111 TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2008
    Messages:
    1,730
    I believe they are used to scribe archs of different radius`s .
     
  6. WS-1

    WS-1 Banned User Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2009
    Messages:
    3,885
    LA,

    You have a combination mortise/tenon gauge, but, unfortunately, it is missing its "fence." The tool was used to score "cut lines" on the edges of stiles for mortise cuts and on the ends of rails for tenon cuts. Let's say you are building a 1 3/4" Exterior Door. You would machine the parts to appropriate lengths and widths and you would then work out the joints. Place a side stile in your Emmert pattern maker's vise with the edge up and lay-off the location
    of the mortises. Using the adjustment screw, set the two scoring points 5/8" apart. You want the mortise to be exactly in the center of the edge of the stile, so you will then set your "fence" 9/16" away from the scoring point on the long end of the gauge. When you score the stile, the lines will be 9/16" from both faces of the door stile and thus, directly in the center of its edge.
    Say the width of the lock rail is 8" on face. After scoring the cut lines, use your very sharp 5/8" wood chisel and plow out the first course of your mortise. Make the depth of the cut about 3/16" deep. With your brace and 5/8" bit, bore 3" to 3 1/2" deep holes in the clean cut mortise you started with your chisel. Use your sharp 1" wood chisel to clean the sides of the mortise all the way to the bottom of the bored holes. Make the sides straight and smooth.

    Without changing the settings on the combination mortise/tenon guage, score the end grain of your cross rails. After laying off the shoulder cuts on all of your cross rails, score the top and bottom edges from the shoulder "cut line" to the end where the scoring lines will line up exactly with the scoring lines you have already put on the end grain. Use your sharp cross-cut hand saw and make the shoulder cuts. Next, place the first cross rail in your vise end up and cut outside the score line on both sides of the end grain until you reach the shoulder cut. You have just completed your rough tenon. The tenon is larger than the mortise because we deliberately cut on the outside of the score lines. The tenon needs to be "fitted" to the mortise.

    Drum roll, please! Remember that beautiful Rabbet plane of yours? Use it to smooth each side of the tenon until the tenon just squeaks into the mortise. When final assembly of the door takes place, the mortise and tenon joint you just glued and clamped together will last until your great grandchildren pull that old door down and make a go-cart out of it.

    I probably have a spare "fence" out in the shop somewhere. Drop me a PM with your address and I'll send it to you.

    Take care,

    Kit
     
  7. W.R.Buchanan

    W.R.Buchanan Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2009
    Messages:
    913
    Location:
    Ojai CA
    Now that's what I call a real accurate answer to a question!

    It's good to know there are still people who actually know what they are doing.

    Guys when you get a clear and concise answer like this to a complex question you can rst assured that what you are hearing is probably the ultimate truth.

    It's how I sift thru the BS.

    Randy
     
  8. Catpower

    Catpower Molon Labe TS Supporters

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    10,248
    Location:
    In the Cabana
    I guess they used the same tool for two differant purposes because we used to use the exact same tool to scribe circles and arcs in sheet metal and in the catalog they called them trammel points,and they came in differant lengths I guess they were wrong 40 yrs ago
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.